Tag Archives: theological training

37 – Feb. 06 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Bucknell University
 We must always remember that God rewards faithfulness, not fame.  We certainly rejoice over those who have made a great impact on their world, but must not forget those who have labored in obscurity.  Daniel Erastus Burt is an example of one of those unsung heroes of the faith.
Daniel E. Burt was born in Cambridge Springs, PA, on Nov. 4, 1835, in his father’s Tannery plant.  He received his theological training in Lewisburg, PA., at what is now Bucknell University.  For 35 years, he was the pastor of small rural churches in western N.Y., and northwestern, PA.  Because the churches were unable to support his family, he often doubled as the local school master.
After his retirement, a newspaper asked him to write a series of articles summarizing his years in the ministry.  The yellowed clippings of these stories are still a blessing to his descendants.  In one he tells of two sisters, professed infidels that passed by the church one Monday evening during the services and decided to go in and make fools of themselves.
They went forward at the invitation each night feigning their need of spiritual help.  One night after the service with only the Pastor, the evangelist, her sister and one other person present, as the little maid that the Lord Jesus raised from the dead, the older sister confessed that she had such a burden of sin and guilt that she couldn’t take it any longer and fell on her face before the Lord and heard Him say, “Thy sins be forgiven thee.”   She was later sent to Yokohama, Japan as a missionary.  Pastor Burt died on July 29, 1908, and his faithful wife, Orpha, followed him into that eternal land of joy on Feb. 6, 1922.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp. 75-77.

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359 – Dec. 25 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


December 25, 1821 – William Ashmore was born in Putnam, Ohio. He graduated from Granville College and took his theological training in the Covington Theological Institution in Kentucky. In 1848 he was ordained by the Baptist church in Hamilton, Ohio, and became pastor of that church. After applying for missionary service in China, Ashmore was appointed the following year and sailed on August 17, 1850, for the field. He arrived at Hong Kong on Jan. 4, 1851, and at Bangkok on April 14. Applying himself to the language, he was soon able to work among the people and continued his labors there until 1858, when he transferred to Hong Kong. His wife’s health failed at that time and she sailed for America in May of that year, but died at sea off of the Cape of Good Hope, and was buried at sea. Two years later Ashmores ill health compelled him to return to the States. Upon recovering, he returned in 1864 to China with his second wife. They went to Kak-Chie and were successful in 1870 in teaching the indigenous policy that he had developed. He held that the primary need was not for “mission stations” and  “professional missionaries,” such as professors and writers, but for evangelists and church planters. Two national missionaries were sent out to be supported by the funds raised in the church that Dr. Ashmore led. That church with 142 members, paid almost all the expenses of their own two countrymen. The poor heath of Mrs. Ashmore caused them to return to America in 1875, but they went back in 1877. They were delighted to find the church in good condition with growing influence. Dr. Ashmore had translated four portions of the N.T. into the language of the common people. His son, William Ashmore, Jr. continued his ministry after his death.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 539-40.

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