Tag Archives: theological institution

188 – July 06 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Johann G. Oncken

Se-Baptism does not satisfy German believers

On April 22, 1834, at Altona, across from Hamburg, Germany, Dr. Barnas Sears baptized, in the Elbe, Johann Gerhard Oncken and six others. Oncken, through the influence of Calvin Tibbs, a sea captain, had been led to adopt Baptist principles. Dr. Sears was destined to become distinguished among Baptists in America as an educator and author, but he is best known for this single event that took place thousands of miles away. Sears was born in Sandisfield, Massachusetts on Nov. 19, 1802, and as a youth was trained in the best schools and entered Brown University where he graduated with the highest honors of his class in 1825. He finished his theological training at Newton Theological Institution and was called to pastor the First Baptist Church of Hartford, Connecticut. After two years he became a professor at Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution until 1833 when he resigned so he could travel to Germany to further his training. Providentially God had been moving on the heart of J.G. Oncken concerning the necessity of believer’s immersion but there was no one to perform the ordinance. He had written to Baptists in England and one had suggested “Se-Baptism” (i.e. self-baptism), but Oncken could not accept this as being the will of God. How wonderful that God sent Dr. Sears at this time to meet the need. Upon his return Dr. Sears became President of Newton Theological Seminary. In 1848 he was elected secretary and executive agent of the Massachusetts Board of Education. He later was chosen as the Trustee of the Peabody Trust for the cause of the education in the South after the Civil War. He later moved to Staunton, Virginia and served the Baptist people there until his death on July 6, 1880.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: adapted From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 276-77.

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239 – Aug. 27 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A Citadel of Christianity

 

1807 – Elder Ashbel Hosmer led the Baptists around the Hamilton, N.Y area to form the Hamilton Missionary Society. This was prior to the Congregationalists sending the Judson’s and Luther Rice to Burma. Elder Hosmer was pastor of the Baptist church in Hamilton and was succeeded by Rev. Daniel Hascall who, as a ministry of the church, founded the Hamilton Literary and Theological Institution. From this effort 1200 ministers of the Gospel went out across America and in heathen lands. It became known as the “West Point” of Christian service. 19 years after its founding, a few non-ministerial students were allowed entrance and the Institution began to change and in 1846 its name changed and was charted as Hamilton University. However, to shield the Theological Department from the state, they kept it as a separate corporation. Finally the 2nd law of thermodynamics took over and secularization in the end carried the day and what began as a great Citadel of the Christian faith is now simply Colgate University, a monument to infidelity.  [J.N.M. The Missionary Jubilee (New York: Sheldon and Company, 1871), p. 338. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 468-470.]                   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

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26 – Jan. 26 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Newton experienced numerous seasons of revival
 Hanna Parker Grafton was married to Joseph Grafton on Jan. 26, 1835 as his third wife when he was 78 years old, just a year before his death on Dec. 16, 1836.  Joseph was born on June 9, 1757, in Newport, R.I.  His father was a mariner, his mother was a serious lady, intent on catechizing her children, but Joseph came into contact with his father’s naval friends, and soon picked up their vices.  When he reached his 18th birthday, an extensive revival prevailed in Providence.  The Lord was moving in both the Congregational and Baptist churches.  Joseph came under conviction and in time joined the Congregational church and was immersed because he was convinced that the scriptures taught this mode of baptism.  On Dec. 12, 1779 he was wed.  The deacons were convinced that he should preach but he was reluctant.  A set of trials caused him to reconsider.  In May of 1783 his oldest child died.  A few weeks later, his second child died also.  Soon his wife followed them to the grave yard.  He was still unconvinced.  In July of 1784 he was seized with a severe attack of bleeding from the lungs and their seemed little hope of recovery, but he gradually improved, and yielded to the Lord.  The Congregational church granted him a license to preach at Plainfield, CT., to a congregation of Separatists.  During that time his studies led him to become a Baptist and he was called to the First Baptist Church of Providence, R.I.  He later took a Baptist church in Newton, MA where he remained for fifty years.  He also founded the Newton Theological Institution.  Soon after going there, he married Mrs. Sally Robinson, a widow with seven children. The Baptist church in Newton experienced numerous seasons of revival during the ministry of Joseph Grafton.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 53-54.

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04 – Jan. 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


His brilliance was revealed early
 William Staughton was born in Coventry, England, on Jan. 4, 1770.  His brilliance was revealed early when at the age of twelve he published poems in Goldsmith’s Animated Nature. He was saved early in life, and baptized by Rev. Samuel Pearce of Birmingham. In 1792 he graduated from Bristol Baptist College, and while a student attended the organizational meeting of the first modern-day missionary agency in the world.  Though still a youth, he sat in the company of men like William Carey and Andrew fuller.  He pastored briefly in Northampton, and then sailed to America in 1793.  Richard Furman requested that he serve as pastor of the Baptist church in Georgetown, S.C., where he remained briefly.  Ordained on June 17, 1797, he served two churches in New Jersey.  He assisted in founding a seminary and continued his studies.  From 1805 to 1823, he served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia and later the Sanson St. Baptist Church of that city.  During that period he also served as the principle of a Baptist Theological institution.  He also served as corresponding secretary of the American Baptist Board of foreign Missions.  In 1823 he was appointed the first President as first president of Columbian College in Washington in Washington, D.C.  He sent his library ahead in anticipation of the move but he never made it.  He became ill and passed into the presence of the Lord on Dec. 12, 1829.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins /, pp. 7-8.

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359 – Dec. 25 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


December 25, 1821 – William Ashmore was born in Putnam, Ohio. He graduated from Granville College and took his theological training in the Covington Theological Institution in Kentucky. In 1848 he was ordained by the Baptist church in Hamilton, Ohio, and became pastor of that church. After applying for missionary service in China, Ashmore was appointed the following year and sailed on August 17, 1850, for the field. He arrived at Hong Kong on Jan. 4, 1851, and at Bangkok on April 14. Applying himself to the language, he was soon able to work among the people and continued his labors there until 1858, when he transferred to Hong Kong. His wife’s health failed at that time and she sailed for America in May of that year, but died at sea off of the Cape of Good Hope, and was buried at sea. Two years later Ashmores ill health compelled him to return to the States. Upon recovering, he returned in 1864 to China with his second wife. They went to Kak-Chie and were successful in 1870 in teaching the indigenous policy that he had developed. He held that the primary need was not for “mission stations” and  “professional missionaries,” such as professors and writers, but for evangelists and church planters. Two national missionaries were sent out to be supported by the funds raised in the church that Dr. Ashmore led. That church with 142 members, paid almost all the expenses of their own two countrymen. The poor heath of Mrs. Ashmore caused them to return to America in 1875, but they went back in 1877. They were delighted to find the church in good condition with growing influence. Dr. Ashmore had translated four portions of the N.T. into the language of the common people. His son, William Ashmore, Jr. continued his ministry after his death.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 539-40.

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