Tag Archives: Sunday schools

122 – May 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Simple in style – Solemn in manner

 


James Barnett Taylor was ordained for the gospel ministry on May 2, 1826, at Sandy Creek Church in Virginia.  He had been born in the village of Barton-upon-Humber, England on March 19, 1804.  His father brought his family to America the next year, and they settled in the city of New York.  At the age of 13, young Taylor was baptized and united with the First Baptist Church of New York City. That same year the Family moved to Virginia.   At the age of 16, he began to preach.   In 1826 he became pastor of the Second Baptist Church of Richmond, Virginia, where he served for sixteen years.  During that time he organized Sunday schools and Bible societies and promoted the cause of education.   Six hundred and sixty members were added to the church, three new churches were organized, and upwards of a dozen of the men in his church entered the ministry.  In 1839 he was elected chaplain of the University of Virginia. In 1840 he became pastor of the Third Baptist Church (later known as Grace Baptist Church) in Richmond.  In 1844 he traveled south to encourage the churches to increase their support of missions.  He collected large sums of money for the American Baptist Missionary Societies.  He was also greatly interested in the welfare of the Negroes and was appointed to work with the secretary of the Freedmen’s Bureau.  His last sermons were preached in Alexandria to Negro congregations.  This servant ministered faithfully in a very difficult time and died on December 22, 1871.  Taylor was a preacher, simple in style and solemn in manner.
Dr. Dale R. Hart adapted from: “This Day in Baptist History III” David L. Cummins. pp. 254 – 255

 

 

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29 – Jan. 29 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Evangelism was foremost on her mind.
 
Jan. 29, 1896 – A newly erected building was dedicated in Sendai, Japan through the efforts of a lady missionary by the name of Lavina Mead of New Lisbon, Wisconsin. Lavina had originally gone to Ingole, India but found the field to severe. At the outset, the school housed fifteen girls, a Bible woman, and two helpers. As time went on, the enrollment increased, and the impact of the gospel was felt throughout the area until four hundred children were enrolled in seven Sunday schools. These schools were conducted by personnel trained by Miss Mead at the school. Education was only a means to the end for Miss Mead, for evangelism was foremost on her mind. “Winning” of souls to her Lord Jesus Christ was ever her first aim in life,” as was reported in the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Women’s Missionary Society of 1902. For eleven years she directed the work in Sendai, and then before her furlough, she was assigned to Chofu-Shimonoseki, where her ministry resulted in house meetings, community Bible classes, women’s and children’s meetings, and the establishment of Sunday schools. A well deserved furlough ended that phase of her life. In 1908 she returned to Japan’s second largest city, Osaka, and founded the Women’s Bible Training School, where she served.  for the remaining eighteen years of her overseas ministry. With, unending energy she labored, and within five years, fourteen young women had graduated from the training school she had established, as teachers in women’s evangelism or as pastors’ wives. Other buildings were built and dedicated, and not wanting to be a burden she resigned.
[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press. pp. 55-56. Tai Shigaki, American Baptist Quarterly (BarreVt.: Northlight Studio Pres, Inc., 1993), 12:261.] Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

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364 – Dec. 30 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


He had no fear of excoriating politicians or religious leaders
December 30, 1835 – Zacharius N. Morrell (Z.N.) with a clear voice and a stronger body than he had known for years,  preached his first sermon on Texas soil. He had just arrived with his physician and several other friends from Tennessee on a survey trip to see if his family could be safely taken to that Roman Catholic enclave. He determined that night, that he would bring his wife and four children to Texas and cast his lot with that turbulent empire. According to B.F. Riley, Morrell had the distinction of being the most, “daring, uncompromising and aggressive of the pioneer Baptist preachers of Texas.” J.M. Carroll said that he was responsible for, “having laid the right foundations of organized Baptist work in Texas.” Born in S.C. on Jan. 17, 1803, he received little formal education but was known for his courage and fiery temperament. He began preaching before he was 20 and served for 14 years in Tennessee. For a period of 9 years he averaged preaching a sermon per day even though he was hemorrhaging from his lung. The anti-missionary forces had made inroads into Texas but Morrell formed the first “missionary” Baptist church in the state at Washington on the Brazos with 8 members in 1837. As a champion of missions, temperance, Sunday schools, and education, he stamped his impression upon the early labors in his adopted state. He organized churches and associations. He had no fear of excoriating politicians or religious leaders when he felt that they were to be censured. He felt that the Bible was to be wielded as a sharp two-edged sword. He also countered the “Hard-Shells” and the “Campbellites” when they penetrated the state along with fighting the Indians.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 547-49.

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