Tag Archives: State-Church authorities

25 – Jan. 25 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


She was found guilty and sentenced to death by drowning. 
The unnamed daughter of Hans Hut, the outstanding Anabaptist leader in Germany died the martyrs death for her faith, by drowning, on Jan. 25, 1527 in the city of Bamburg.  Hut was a convert of Hans Denck, and on May 26, 1526, followed His Lord in believers baptism.  His daughter was one of his first converts who followed him in his new found faith.  Women among the Anabaptists held a superior position above other groups.  They referred to them as “sisters” and the ladies had a ministry of personal witnessing.   Their enemies accused them of practicing “free-love.”  There was no basis to the lie.  In fact, the high basis of morality of the Anabaptists was often mentioned by sincere historians of that era.  Hans daughter lived but a few months following her conversion to Christ.  Hans was accompanied by his family when he went to Bamberg in evangelistic work where he met with considerable success and then left them there when he departed for Augsburg.  While he was gone, his daughter was arrested.  She had participated in many Anabaptist meetings and had a firm grasp on the New Testament.  When arrested by State Church authorities (Lutheran) she gave clear answers as to her faith in Christ and refused to disavow her Lord.  She was found guilty and sentenced to death by drowning.  On this date, she was led to the river where she was placed in a bag with heavy weights and thrown to her death by drowning.  How blessed it must have been, as Stephen of old to have been greeted by our Lord Himself, who no doubt stepped off his throne to greet such a precious prize jewel, and no doubt gave her a name that her Lord has reserved just for her.  Revelation 2:17 “To him that overcometh will I give…a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.”
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 51-52.

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09 – Jan. 09 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


http://the-trumpet-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Michael-sattler-.jpg.

The Picture below is of Michael Sattler preaching in the woods.

The leader of the group was Hans Schmidt
 On Jan. 09, 1558, State-Church authorities broke into a small congregation of twelve in Aachen on the Rhine and seized all, even an infant in its cradle.  Some members were tortured on the rack, and others were suspended from the ground by their arms with heavy iron weights attached to their feet.  Of the group, one man recanted, but five remained steadfast.  Six women were flogged and exiled and five men were strangled and burned in Oct. of 1558.  The leader of the group was Hans Schmidt.  As they were detained in separate cells their days were filled with torture as their captors tried to get information about other Anabaptist assemblies.  To encourage one another, the prisoners would sing hymns as loudly as possibly.  Prior to his execution, Schmidt composed hymns and was able also to smuggle several dozen letters out of the prison.  These provided many details concerning torture, interrogation, and life as it was experienced while incarcerated.  People of every walk of life gave their life rather than to recant.  Men would prepare the message that they were determined to give at their execution.  It was for this reason that Michael Sattler’s tongue was cut out so that he couldn’t speak.  As Hans Shmidt went to his death, his voice rang out with joy: “In you, O Father, Is my joy, Though I must suffer here! Let me by scorned, By everyone, If your grace still is here!
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins /, pp. 18-20.

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