Tag Archives: Spirit

Genuine Gladness  


Psalm 4

Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: thou hast enlarged me when I was in distress,” Psalm 4:1.

Some of David’s actions were of the flesh and not at all godly. However, God’s Spirit witnessed to his spirit that he was a child of God and heir to special privileges. When David was convicted of his sin he poured out his heart to his Creator, “For I acknowledge my transgressions: . . . Against thee, thee only, have I sinned, and done this evil in thy sight” (Psalm 51:3, 4).

One of my favorite teachers, Brother Ray Brooks, often quoted an old chimney corner proverb. “It’s not how a man falls that qualifies him as a man. It is how he gets up that defines his character.” David was constantly at war with Israel’s enemies, and he consulted with God so much that his warriors considered David’s prayer and clout with God as part of the army’s battle strategy.

David did not measure God’s love for him by answered prayers or by God’s giving an abundance of good things. “Thou hast put gladness in my heart, more than in the time that their corn and their wine increased. I will both lay me down in peace, and sleep: for thou, Lord, only makest me dwell in safety” (Psalm 4:7, 8).

Leave it in God’s hands; sleep in peace and wake up thanking Him for another day to live for Him, not knowing what is in store, whether good or bad. David would be the first to admit that living by faith is hard on the flesh. But, it is the only life that brings gladness to the soul. In God’s eyes everything is right on track. Hold on tight!



God is on His throne and all is right with the world.

Robert Brock

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124– May 03 – This Day in Baptist History Past

A timely snowstorm, a changed life
On the first Sunday in 1850 at the age of fifteen Charles Spurgeon converted to Christ. On January 6, 1850 a snow storm made him seek shelter in a Primitive Methodist chapel in Colchester. The scheduled speaker could not keep his appointment, and one of the men attempted to preach. His text was Isaiah 45:22, “Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth: for I am God, and there is none else.” After exhausting his thoughts on the passage, he looked straight at the young Spurgeon and said: “Young man, you look very miserable! You always will be miserable-miserable in life and miserable in death, if you don’t obey my text: but if you obey now, this moment you will be saved. Young man, look to Jesus! Look! Look! Look! You have nothing to do but to look and live”
Young Spurgeon heard, not the voice of the inept preacher, but the voice of the Spirit of God and was gloriously saved. Realizing his need to be baptized “He walked from Hew Market to Isleham, seven miles, on May 3rd, 1850, where Rev. Mr. Cantlow buried him with Christ in Baptism.”
Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 180-181
The post 124– May 03 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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114 — April 24 – This Day in Baptist History Past

Adoniram Judson
Comfort in affliction
1827 – Little Maria Judson, the infant daughter of Adoniram and Ann Judson, missionaries to Burma, died on this date, just a few months following the tragic death of her dear mother.  In a letter to Ann’s mother Rebecca Hasseltine, dated April 26, 1827, Adoniram tried to comfort her, the best he knew how with the following words:  “My sweet little Maria lies by the side of her fond mother…an affection of the bowels,) proved incurable.  She had the best medical advice; and the kind care of Mrs. Wade could not have been, in any respect, exceeded by that of her own mother.  But all our efforts, and prayers, and tears, could not propitiate the cruel disease.  The work of death went forward; and after the usual process, excruciating to a parent’s feelings, she ceased to breathe… at three o’clock P.M. aged two years and three months.
We then closed her faded eyes, and bound up her discolored lips, where the dark touch of death first appeared, and folded her little hands-the exact pattern of her mothers on her cold breast.  The next morning, we made her last bed, In the small closure which surrounds her mother’s grave.  Together they rest in hope, under the hope tree, (Hopia) which stands at the head of the graves; and together, I trust, their spirits are rejoicing, after a short separation of precisely six months.  Thus I am left alone in this wide world.  My father’s family and all my relatives, have been, for many years, separated from me, by seas that I shall never pass.  They are the same to me as if buried.  My own dear family I have actually buried: one in Rangoon, and two in Amherst.”…What remains is for me to follow where my Savior reigns.”
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, p. 166.
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Watch and Pray


Ephesians 6:18


Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints,” Ephesians 6:18.


One of the most important jobs in aviation happens in the control tower. Although all parties, from the ground crew to the pilot work together to have a successful flight, no one is more important than the person watching out for the aircraft.


Have we ever considered Christian warriors as similar to aircraft controllers? We have to be on guard twenty-four hours a day against Satan and his advocates. We must be hypersensitive to the activities of Satan and his sly wolves in sheep clothing tactics. In fact, we must always seek God’s guidance by the Holy Spirit through prayer. Certainly, we can never pray too much or too often for His guidance.


Likewise, everything we attempt to do should be saturated in prayer before hand, whether it pertains to personal, family, church, school or governmental matters. And shamefully, we often neglect this great and easily accessed benefit of being God’s children.


Additionally, we must pray for others in an effort to intercede in prayer on their behalf—praying for healing, spiritual strength and God’s guidance in their lives. It is our duty and our pleasure to pray for others.


We must always watch and pray!





Restraining prayer, we cease to fight. Prayer makes the Christian armor bright. And Satan trembles when he sees, the meanest saint upon his knees—Author unknown.


Beverly Barnett




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Assurance of Resurrection


2 Corinthians 5:1-8


Now he that hath wrought us for the selfsame thing is God, who also hath given unto us the earnest of the Spirit,” 2 Corinthians 5:5.



When a person wants to purchase a home, many times the owner will require earnest money from the potential buyer. Earnest money is a nonrefundable deposit that reserves the home for the potential buyer, preventing anyone else from purchasing the home until the buyer is ready. Should the buyer change his mind, the home owner keeps the earnest money because the home was off the market and could have been sold to another buyer.


The Bible teaches that the Holy Spirit works in a similar way to guarantee that we are, and will forever be, God’s. At the moment of faith in Jesus Christ, God makes our dead souls come alive by sealing us with His indwelling Holy Spirit. Not only does the Holy Spirit empower us to live for God, but He is also the guarantee that God has every intention of ultimately redeeming, not just our souls, but our bodies as well. God will not change His mind about the purchase of us by the blood of His Son. As an earnest payment, He has sealed us with His Spirit which assures us that, though our flesh may weaken and die, He will fulfill His promise of raising us all from the dead, giving us glorified bodies that have no flaws or defects. So, we can be of good courage (verse 6), knowing that our salvation is sure.






Will you live courageously by the power of the Spirit today?


 Mark Clements



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Soul and Spirit

Bob Hess has done some in depth research on Man’s Soul and Spirit. With consideration of the girl on life support because of a common operation, maybe this will give some people a little insight into a dilemma.



I had an individual who wanted me to do a lesson on “The Difference Between The Soul And The Spirit”.  I taught a Sunday School lesson on this over the weekend and will pass it on to you.  I hope this will answer questions that MANY Christians have had down through the years.


The secret to understanding this topic is the Biblical Terms that were used in talking about the Soul and Spirit.  I attempted to show this in my class.  My Sunday School class seemed to understand it, so I’ll give you a try.  Here it is.



1.  The Greek word Psuche is translated into the word SOUL and LIFE.



    a.  In the New Testament this term is used to speak of the immaterial part of man.  It is invisible and is contained inside of the flesh covering.


    b.  Man’s soul speaks of the INTERNAL LIFE ELEMENT of the man.


    c.  I know that this may set many back on their heals, but animals have a soul.  In Revelation 8:9 we read “And the third part of the creatures which were in the sea, and had life, died and the third part of the ships were destroyed”.  The word “life” is the Greek word Psuche or in the English, soul.


    d.  The difference between the animal and man is that the man was created with a soul that was made up with three elements.  Man’s soul consists of two additional elements that animals do not.  Man has a SPIRIT and a MIND that are part of the makeup of the human SOUL or PSUCHE.  Animal souls do NOT contain these two elements.  We will get into these two elements later.


    e.  In 1 Thessalonians 5:23 Paul speaks of this.  He says that when the Lord comes back, we will go to be with him as a whole person, body, spirit and soul.


    f.  In Genesis 2:7 we are told that God breathed into man’s nostrils the breath of life.  the word soul in this verse the Hebrew word, nephesh.  This word means breaths.  Here it states that man became a living soul or a living, physical, breathing being.  The term corresponds with the Greek word Psuche which is translated as “life” in Revelation 8:9 and soul in other references that are too numerous to mention.  See also 1 Corinthians 15:45 where the term is translated as soul and in Acts 20:10 where it is translated as life.



2.  The word Greek word Pneuma is translated as SPIRIT.



    a.  As was stated in our look at Psuche, the human has an element within the soul that is called the spirit.  That is one element that is NOT found in animals or other created beings.


    b.  It is very important to realize that this is NOT the word that is used for a GHOST.  The KJV translates Pneuma as Ghost in speaking of the Holy Spirit.  “Ghost” is a completely different term in the Greek, which we will see later.  The third person of the Godhead is the HOLY SPIRIT and NOT the HOLY GHOST.


    c.  The SPIRIT of man is not a material element, but is, as the soul, immaterial.


    d.  This part of man makes the man aware of his body and his natural, physical environment.


    e.  It is the part of man that makes him like God in the respect that it (the spirit) is eternal (will NEVER go out of existence) and it can share that characteristic of God.


    f.  It is the part of man that can be given a new birth from God (John 3:3-7).  NOTE:  It is the SPIRIT (Pneuma) that is born again (from above by the Spirit of God) and not the soul (Psuche).  This new birth is made possible through placing one’s trust in Jesus as his


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Humility—The Way to Greatness


Luke 14:10, 11


For whosoever exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted,” Luke 14:11.




To humble oneself to be exalted is an oxymoron. James and Peter also gave the same admonition. God resists the proud but gives grace to the humble. Since the grace of greatness is only afforded by God to those who are humble, it would benefit us to find out what it means to humble oneself. Jesus publicly accused the Pharisees of false piety for publicly advertising their fasts and disfiguring themselves to appear humble and submissive.


Humility that God recognizes is supernatural, a gift of the Holy Spirit, like the fruit of the Spirit (Gal. 5:22, 23). Humility appears not to be the result of praying for it, but rather surrendering oneself to God’s control. “Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall lift you up” (James 4:10). Here, we see James, Jesus’ blood brother, advising us to humble ourselves to be lifted up by God. One basically has to lift an empty cup for God to fill. “Blessed are the poor in spirit [spiritually bankrupt] for their’s is the kingdom of heaven” (Matt. 5:3).


Greatness in the eyes of God may be opposite man’s idea of greatness. Jesus told twelve jealous apostles that the greatest people in the kingdom are those with a servant’s heart, willing to serve others rather than be served. Jesus Himself came not to be ministered unto, but to minister.




Just Saying


Here’s my cup, Lord. Fill it up and run it over into others’ lives.



Robert Brock



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Greater Is He


Ye are of God, little children, and have overcome them: because greater is he that is in you, than he that is in the world,” 1 John 4:4.


This marvelous sentence hangs on one word because.


Because Christ has sealed Himself to the believer’s spirit, the believer lives in a state of supernatural power. He has access to the throne of God and to the compassionate Mediator who knows exactly what His child is going through.  He has been there, “I feel your pain, little one.”


The title little children shows a relationship. Little shows dependence on God the Father who willingly offers all the grace and strength necessary to overcome Satan and his forces. This same promise of powerful supernatural resources is made to every little child of God.


Little children who know their position compared to God, their Creator, have a great deal of confidence. “I saw also the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple. Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone” (Isa. 6:1, 5). He then said, “Here am I; send me” (verse 8).


I have a grandson who was frightened out of his wits when his mother left him in someone else’s care. However, he began to realize that she would always come back and learned to relax and enjoy the innocent life of a helpless child. His mama and daddy had his back.  Jesus taught us to pray for God to deliver us from evil. This word evil in the Greek language is an adjective used as a noun and could be translated, deliver us from the evil one. When we stand toe to toe with the devil, we need to know that the Creator of the universe has our backs. We need to put on the rest of the armor to fight with all His might the good fight of faith. Do not give Satan an inch or he will take a mile (Eph. 6:10-18).





Everyone can have victory and be an overcomer.


Robert A. Brock



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261 – Sept. 18 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Nearly every house a house of prayer


1842 – Elder Jabez Smith Swan preached the last Sunday of a five week evangelistic effort that began on August 14 in Mystic, Conn. Those present said that he was truly ‘in the Spirit on the Lord’s day’, as he preached with great power. After the first baptism, there were daily baptisms in Mystic for twenty-six successive days, and sometimes twice daily. More than four hundred persons were baptized during that period. Almost every house was turned into a house of prayer. Swan was born in Stonington, Conn. on Feb. 23, 1800 and at fourteen had “given a good account of himself” as a powder boy in the defense of his town in the War of 1812. He moved to Lyme with his parents, Joshua and Esther and had a deep conversion experience when he was twenty-one years old and was baptized by Rev. William Palmer. He was called to preach, studied at the Hamilton Literary and Theological Institute, and was ordained to the gospel ministry on June 20, 1827. He pastored several churches but always returned to evangelism. He died in 1884 after seeing more than 10,000 conversions, most of them baptized. [F. Dennison, The Evangelist, or Life and Labors of Rev. Jabez S. Swan (Waterford, Conn.,: Wm. L. Peckham, 1873), pp. 193-95, 203-4. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 511-13]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon


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The conversion that “shook the world.”
December 15, 1850 – Charles H. Spurgeon was converted to Christ, and it was the conversion that “shook the world.”  According to the following account given by Baptist Historian William Cathcart,” Spurgeon happened to go into a Primitive Methodist Chapel in Colchester, and heard a sermon on the text, ‘Look unto Me and be ye saved.’ From that hour he rejoiced in salvation.” However, in a sermon that Spurgeon himself delivered in the New Park Street Chapel on Sunday, January 6, 1856, he gave the date of his conversion as Jan. 6, 1850. Nevertheless the conversion of the 15 year old boy can never be called into question, for his life was changed radically as he placed his trust in the finished work of Christ for his redemption. It was a cold, snowy day, and the storm was so fierce that the scheduled preacher did not arrive to preach his message. Fifteen people or fewer made up the congregation. A local layman finally agreed to preach, and he chose for his text Isaiah 45:22, “Look unto Me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth.” In a brief few minutes the speaker had exhausted the text…and seeing the guilt-ridden face of the lad under the balcony, he fixed his eyes upon Charles, and pointing with his finger he shouted, “Young man, you’re in trouble! Look to Jesus Christ! Look! Look! Look! “ And Spurgeon did look in faith, believing, and God brought peace and purpose to his heart and life. Little could that layman have known that the storm in his heart was more severe than the storm outside the building! In his Autobiography, he gives an entire chapter to the subject of his conviction. He said, “Let none despise the strivings of the Spirit in the hearts of the young; let not boyish anxieties and juvenile repentance be lightly regarded.” Jesus said, “Forbid them not.”
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 523-24.

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