Tag Archives: souls

116 — April 26 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Broadmead Baptist
Still exists today.
Upstairs above building
Baptists under fire
1670 – This was the day that Thomas Ewins, pastor of the Broadmead Church, the “Baptized Congregation”,  according to Edward Terrill, clerk of the church, “having layen a greate while weake, Departed this life…”  Terrill went on to say that he preached clearly “of Free grace by Faith in Christ Jesus. “  He was full of good works, showing patience and meekness toward all men, carefully searching into the state of their souls.  He was buried in James’s Yard accompanied by many hundreds to his grave.  Even his chief persecutor, Sr. Jo Knight, said, “he did believe he was gone to heaven.”  The Broadmead church was founded in Bristol, England in 1640, and Thomas Ewins, formerly an Episcopalian became pastor in 1651.  In 1661 the pastor was seized on July 27, while he was preaching and jailed for refusing a license by the Anglican State authorities.  After two months in prison he was released only to be arrested again on Oct. 4, 1663 with several others, and this time languished in prison for a year.  While there he would preach to the people from an open window from his fourth-floor cell. The church continued to be faithful and met some times out doors, and from house to house, or wherever they could escape their tormentors.  The ladies would sit on the stairs at one meeting place and sing when the authorities came to warn the men to stop preaching.  Sometimes they would hide in a cellar.  Their firmness was shown by a resolution that those who absented themselves because of fear should be dealt with as disorderly members.  We should be proud of our Baptist forbears who were so strong.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, p. 169.
The post 116 — April 26 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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257 – Sept. 14 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

This Day in Baptist History Past

 

He Baptized Over 1500 Souls

 

1840 – Rev. Robert T. Daniel went to be with the Lord just months after his wife, Penelope Cain Flowers had finished her earthly sojourn. His last words were, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” He was born on June 10, 1773, in Middlesex County, Virginia, the fifth son of Samuel and Eliza Daniel, the same year of the Boston Tea Party. After the Revolutionary War the family migrated to N.C. and it was there that Daniel met his wife, was saved, baptized, and called to preach. This was through the influence of the Separate Baptist, Elder Isaac Hicks, at Holly Springs, N.C. Though uneducated, Daniel held successful pastorates, in N.C., S.C., and VA, before moving his family to Tennessee, where he preached until he finally settled in Salem, Miss. which he called home until the Lord called him home. On horseback and by foot, he traveled about sixty thousand miles, preached nearly five thousand sermons, and baptized more than fifteen hundred. His biographer wrote, “It has been the lot of but few men to serve his generation more acceptably, or usefully, than Elder R.T. Daniel.” [Geo. W. Purefoy, A History of the Sandy Creek Ass.(N.Y:Sheldon & Co., 1859), pp. 301-2. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 503-04.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

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29 – Jan. 29 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


Evangelism was foremost on her mind.
 
Jan. 29, 1896 – A newly erected building was dedicated in Sendai, Japan through the efforts of a lady missionary by the name of Lavina Mead of New Lisbon, Wisconsin. Lavina had originally gone to Ingole, India but found the field to severe. At the outset, the school housed fifteen girls, a Bible woman, and two helpers. As time went on, the enrollment increased, and the impact of the gospel was felt throughout the area until four hundred children were enrolled in seven Sunday schools. These schools were conducted by personnel trained by Miss Mead at the school. Education was only a means to the end for Miss Mead, for evangelism was foremost on her mind. “Winning” of souls to her Lord Jesus Christ was ever her first aim in life,” as was reported in the Thirty-first Annual Report of the Women’s Missionary Society of 1902. For eleven years she directed the work in Sendai, and then before her furlough, she was assigned to Chofu-Shimonoseki, where her ministry resulted in house meetings, community Bible classes, women’s and children’s meetings, and the establishment of Sunday schools. A well deserved furlough ended that phase of her life. In 1908 she returned to Japan’s second largest city, Osaka, and founded the Women’s Bible Training School, where she served.  for the remaining eighteen years of her overseas ministry. With, unending energy she labored, and within five years, fourteen young women had graduated from the training school she had established, as teachers in women’s evangelism or as pastors’ wives. Other buildings were built and dedicated, and not wanting to be a burden she resigned.
[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press. pp. 55-56. Tai Shigaki, American Baptist Quarterly (BarreVt.: Northlight Studio Pres, Inc., 1993), 12:261.] Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

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