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122 – May 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Simple in style – Solemn in manner

 


James Barnett Taylor was ordained for the gospel ministry on May 2, 1826, at Sandy Creek Church in Virginia.  He had been born in the village of Barton-upon-Humber, England on March 19, 1804.  His father brought his family to America the next year, and they settled in the city of New York.  At the age of 13, young Taylor was baptized and united with the First Baptist Church of New York City. That same year the Family moved to Virginia.   At the age of 16, he began to preach.   In 1826 he became pastor of the Second Baptist Church of Richmond, Virginia, where he served for sixteen years.  During that time he organized Sunday schools and Bible societies and promoted the cause of education.   Six hundred and sixty members were added to the church, three new churches were organized, and upwards of a dozen of the men in his church entered the ministry.  In 1839 he was elected chaplain of the University of Virginia. In 1840 he became pastor of the Third Baptist Church (later known as Grace Baptist Church) in Richmond.  In 1844 he traveled south to encourage the churches to increase their support of missions.  He collected large sums of money for the American Baptist Missionary Societies.  He was also greatly interested in the welfare of the Negroes and was appointed to work with the secretary of the Freedmen’s Bureau.  His last sermons were preached in Alexandria to Negro congregations.  This servant ministered faithfully in a very difficult time and died on December 22, 1871.  Taylor was a preacher, simple in style and solemn in manner.
Dr. Dale R. Hart adapted from: “This Day in Baptist History III” David L. Cummins. pp. 254 – 255

 

 

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344 – Dec. 10 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


They filled the jails, but their churches just kept growing.
 December 10, 1769 – Dutton Lane founded the Nottoway Baptist Church in Virginia. This church ultimately founded many others. Lane was born Nov. 7 near Baltimore, MD, the same year that George Washington was born – 1732. It is not known when Dutton’s father moved the family to Virginia near the N.C. line. Soon after Shubal Stearns and Daniel Marshall established the Sandy Creek church in N.C. they entered Virginia where they preached the gospel and baptized believers among whom was Dutton Lane. A revival followed, and elder Marshall baptized forty-two persons at one time. It was nothing until Lane was preaching, and Samuel Harriss, a man of distinction in that area, was converted. People far and wide began requesting someone to come preach to them, even as far as Culpeper and Spotsylvania Counties. In August of 1760 the first Separate Baptist church in Virginia was organized at Dan River. Lane became its pastor, and by 1772 he had established five different preaching stations with five assistants. The success of the Baptists brought the wrath of Satan down upon them. The hand of the Lord was revealed as James Roberts was going for a warrant in 1769 against Richard Elkins (one of Lanes Assistants). They said that a bright light shone about them so much that their horses squatted on the ground succeeded by such thick darkness that they could not see. Roberts concluded that it was a warning to him to stop being “an opposer.” Dutton’s own father threatened to murder him until his wife persuaded him to listen to him preach which he did, got saved, and his own son baptized his father that was going to kill him. Nothing would nor could stop these preaching men in Virginia. They filled the jails, but their churches just kept growing.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 515-17.

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326 – Nov. 22 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


The growth in Virginia was almost breathtaking

November 22, 1755 – Sandy Creek Baptist Church, of Sandy Creek, North Carolina was constituted by Shubal Stearns and a total of eight families adding up to 16 members. The little flock built a meeting house and they rapidly grew to over six hundred under the leadership of Stearns and his brother-in-law Daniel Marshall and Joseph Breed who assisted him. The historian, George Washington Paschal has stated in his book, The History of the North Carolina Baptists that, “I make bold to say that these Separate Baptists have proved to be the most remarkable body of Christians America has known.” David L. Cummins continues, “I further agree with Paschal that had the Baptist cause in America continued under the domination of a strong Calvinism, such as the Particular Baptists advocated, Baptists would not have grown into such a force for God in our land.” It was a memorable day when the little group of Separate Baptists traveled to Sandy Creek, Guilford, County, N.C. Marshall was tireless in his efforts and was soon preaching in Virginia with tremendous results. In an early visit he baptized Dutton Lane, and he soon began to exhort. As a result, revival fell. Marshall at one time baptized 42. Samuel Harriss, who later became the leader of the Separate Baptists in Virginia, was also baptized by Marshall. The growth in Virginia was almost breathtaking, but so was the persecution by the Anglican state church that followed that swept many of the preachers into prison. In 17 years the Sandy Creek church was responsible for 42 churches and 125 Baptist ministers. Her branches reached out from the Chesapeake Bay eastward to the great river westward; and then to the Potomac northward, and to Georgia to the south. Stearns died at 71.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins /Thompson/, pp. 486-88.

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