Tag Archives: priest

YE ARE COME TO WHAT?


YE ARE COME TO WHAT?

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person

But ye are come unto mount Sion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, And to Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling, that speaketh better things than that of Abel.” Heb 12:22-24.
There is much to glean from these verses of scripture. They center on the contrast between the law, and the church as expressed by “church of the firstborn.” Here, the Old Testament world of shadows and symbols, and the New Testament world of realities come together in a most thrilling way.
It begins in the Hebrews’ exodus from Egypt. God purchased to Himself the firstborn by the blood of the Passover Lamb. He emphatically proclaimed to the Hebrews that the firstfruits of man, beast, the field, etc. belonged to Him, and such must be yielded to Him or redeemed with fair price. Soon a census was taken and the tribe of Levi almost matched in number the total of firstborn saved from death by the blood. Whereupon, God traded the firstborn back to the Hebrews for the entire tribe of Levi who would produce the priests and minister about holy things. It is important to connect the dots here. The Old Testament priests then became representative of the firstborn ones from Egypt.
The Levitical priesthood was destined to cease, giving way to another priesthood, and another high priest after the order of Melchizedec Who would serve the covenant people of God without end. He, of course, is Jesus. Who is THE FIRST BORN from the dead among many brethren.
When the New High Priest fulfilled every jot and title of the Mosaic Law, He redeemed His people of covenant out from under the Old and into the New. The expression of the New Covenant among men is the New Testament Church (purchased with holy blood) and the pillar and ground of the truth. Soon after the empowerment of the church by the Holy Spirit on Pentecost, gentiles were added as it grew by leaps and bounds under the missionary efforts of the Apostle Paul and others. The people of this New Covenant are called the “Israel of God,” Gal. 6:16. Moreover, Peter calls them “a royal priesthood.” I Peter 2:9. Consequently, the writer of Hebrews emphasizes that we are no longer under the law. We have not come to Mt. Sinai, but to Mt. Zion, to the heavenly Jerusalem . . . To the church of the firstborn…. But while we have this blessed status and enjoy the understanding and spiritual maturity it affords us, there is much greater personal responsibility regarding personal submission to the instructions of Christ Jesus, our eternal high priest. We must not turn away from Him Who has spoken to us. We must learn to worship and serve God acceptably. While it is sweet to enjoy our relationship with Him as our Loving Heavenly Father, we must hear the following verses as well, and know that our God is indeed a consuming fire.
The church of the firstborn! What a lofty position to which we have been elevated in Christ Jesus!

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HEBREW HONEYCOMB


 

William Andrew Dillard‘s status.

 

 

PRIESTS, PRIEST, AND A TORN VEIL
In the organization of religious practice in the Old Testament there existed a moveable tabernacle, and later temple built on the same order. The two-room structure hosted an initial room known as the Holy Place. There was also a second room heavily veiled from the first. It was known as the Holy of Holies or The Most Holy Place. It was in this second room that the Ark of the Covenant was located. It was here that the high priest offered the blood of sacrificial animals for the sins of the people on Yom Kippur (day of atonement). It was here that a manifestation of Almighty God appeared from time to time. Busy priests ministered about the sacrifices of the people outside these structures and were admitted into the first room for specific purposes that had to do with the table of showbread, the altar of incense, and the candlestick. However, no one entered the Holy of Holies except the High Priest and that after specific preparation and for definite purpose at the appointed time.
Now these things are written for our admonition upon whom the ends of the world are come, I Cor. 10:11. The Tabernacle and the Temple are no more, but they and their service are types and symbols of present realities that must not be overlooked or forgotten. The Old Testament priests are a type of New Testament priests which are bona fide, active church members, I Peter 2:5,9. The high priest of Israel is a type of our high priest, Who entered into the Holy of Holies in heaven with His own blood as a once-for-all offering for the sins of all who trust in Him, whereby He is able to save them the uttermost who come unto God by Him! Hebrews 7:25. But, as an high priest after the order of Melchisedek, rather than that of Aaron, He continues endlessly, the service of high priest in that He is at the right hand of God, making intercession for us, Romans 8:25, Heb. 7:25. Moreover, we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with our infirmities, Hebrews 4:15, but was tempted on all points as we are, yet without sin.
Upon the resurrection of our high priest from the tomb, the veil of the temple that separated the Holy Place from the Most Holy Place was torn into two pieces, Matt. 27:51. The veil is no longer there to restrict New Testament priests from coming boldly before the throne of Grace with petitions for self and for others, and to find help in time of need. What a “hallelujah-type” privilege! The profound wonder of the age is that it is so little used. May God help us all to not be lazy, uncompassionate priests, but priests that are busier than the Old Testament priests ever were, serving, praying, teaching, ever learning, worshipping in spirit and in truth.

 

 

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316 – Nov. 12 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Simons was an Anabaptist

 

Menno Simons was not the founder of the Mennonite church but rather Conrad Grebel and his brethren, who founded a church in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1525. At this time Simons was struggling as a Catholic priest with infant baptism and trans- substantiation as well as attacking the Cult of Munster. The Munsterites were propagating insurrection, polygamy, fornication, and other heretical doctrines. Because this cult was falsely identified with the Anabaptists, the enemies of the Baptists used the Munsters to stereotype them many years into the future, even a century later in England. Simons wrote volumes attacking infant baptism and propagating believer’s baptism only. He used Rom. 6:3-4 to say, “Here the baptism of believers is again powerfully confirmed, and infant baptism denied as emphatically.” He went on to say that, “…spiritual death and resurrection are represented in holy baptism.”  Thomas Armitage quotes several writers as saying concerning Simons, “He was dipped himself, and he baptized others by dipping.”  In all of his writings he repudiated infant baptism and brought the wrath of the state church down upon himself and identified him as an Anabaptist. Concerning the Lord’s Supper, he made it clear that it was a memorial of the Lord’s death. Simons was a fugitive from the state and suffered greatly at the hands of the magistrates. He was pursued from place to place and saw his brethren who harbored him or were baptized by him tortured or put to death. He believed the church was the representative agent of Christ on earth, and that the Bible was the Word of God. Simons was an Anabaptist. [John Christian Wenger, ed., The Complete Works of Menno Simons, c. 1496-1561 (Scottsdale, Pa.: Hearld Press, 1956) pp. 157-58. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 618-20.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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