Tag Archives: prayer

In Every Thing


“Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God,” Philippians 4:6.

One important lesson a mature Christian learns is that no problem or situation is too small to take to the Lord in prayer. Albert Barnes states, “There is nothing which pertains to body, mind, estate, friends, conflicts, losses, trials, hopes and fears, in reference to which we may not go and spread it all out before the Lord.”  We take time to pray for great needs or answers to serious situations but suppose we start our day with prayer that does not end until we conclude it with amen before we close our eyes at night. Throughout the day we keep the prayer line open to Heaven which includes an attitude and words of thankfulness toward God for His graciousness.
We, however, often let other things steal our time and attention toward God. Praying to God makes us keenly aware of His hand on every aspect of our lives. What if, before we take a step toward the door, we take the time to whisper a prayer of thankfulness for safety, for guidance over our thoughts and intentions and for others. “Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints” (Eph. 6:18).

REFLECTION
Prayer is a free benefit of a gracious God; do not waste another day without using it.
Beverly Barnett

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The “Haystack Prayer Meeting”


1783 – Luther Rice was born into a pedobaptist (Congregational) home on this memorable day.  He along with Adoniram and Ann Judson became Baptists when they were baptized in India, after studying the subject of baptism on the voyage, although on different ships.  Because of this they were compelled to sever relationship with their denomination which left them penniless and identify with the Baptists in America.  In our opinion, this was the beginning of the fulfillment of the prophecy found at Mat 24:14 – And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.   Prior to this there had been only scant missionary activity among the churches of North America and that was to the Indians and the settlers who had migrated westward.  But from this effort of Rice and the Judson’s a great flood of missionaries began to go forth to many parts of the world.  It all started with a group called the “Brethren” who had formed a missionary fellowship interested in world evangelism at Williams College (Congregational) in Massachusetts.  One day during a rain storm some of the “Brethren” took refuge under a haystack, and while there prayed for those in the world who lived in spiritual darkness.  It would forever be called the “Haystack Prayer Meeting.”  Even though Rice wasn’t at the haystack, he was a part of the “Brethren” and was the first with the Judsons to go forth.  Rice eventually returned to America to stir up the Baptists for world evangelism.  He became the rope holder while Judson was tied to the rope.  World missions needed them both.  In the North there were mission societies, in the South the Baptist method was conventions.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson /, pp. 121..

The post 84 – March – 25 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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HEBREW – Call [and] Prayer (3)


qārā’

Besides the some one dozen words rendered prayer in the OT, another that clearly pictures prayer in a few instances is the verb qārā’ (H7121), the root of which (qr’) is found in “Old Aramaic, Canaanite, and Ugaritic, and other Semitic languages (except Ethiopic).”

Appearing more than 730 times, qārā’ has a wide range of meanings, depending upon the context and grammar, including: “to call, declare, summon, invite, read, be called, be invoked, be named.” It is used, for example, of summoning someone, as when God “called unto Adam” (Gen_3:9), when God “called unto [Moses] out of the midst of the bush” (Exo_3:4), and for Adam naming the animals (Gen_2:20) and Eve (Gen_3:20). It is also used of reading aloud from a book or scroll (Exo_24:7; Neh_13:1; Jer_36:6; Jer_36:8). It is even used for the act of preaching (Neh_6:7; Jon_3:2, March 16).

Another significant use of qārā’ is in men calling upon God, a use we see often and that graphically illustrates prayer. After the fall, some men realized the all-encompassing consequences of sin and began to call on God’s name (Gen_4:26; Gen_12:8; Gen_13:4). We are especially struck by verses such as Psa_3:4 : “I cried unto the LORD with my voice, and he heard me out of his holy hill.” Also, Psa_18:6 : “In my distress I called [qārā’] upon the LORD, and cried [qārā’] unto my God.” Such statements, in fact, are a recurring theme in the Psalms (Psa_18:6; Psa_30:8; Psa_34:6; Psa_120:1; Psa_130:1; Psa_138:3).

Psa_119:145 is particularly striking: “I cried with my whole heart; hear me, O LORD: I will keep thy statutes.” Think of it! The psalmist’s entire being was engaged in prayer. He had written in Psa_119:10, “With my whole heart have I sought thee.” We then read in Psa_119:146 : “I cried unto thee; save me, and I shall keep thy testimonies.” Here is true, earnest prayer. And what is the goal of such earnestness? In modern teaching, the goal is ourselves, getting what we want. The psalmist’s goal was a little different, to say the least. His aim was to “keep [God’s statutes [February 19] and] testimonies [February 17].” Let us pray earnestly to that end.

Scriptures for Study: What is the admonition of Psa_116:2? What then is the promise of Psa_145:18?

 

 

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HEBREW – Prayer


pālal [and] śiyach [and] šā’al
Prayer is, of course, a recurring theme in the Psalms. While the verb pālal (H6419) appears only four times (Psa_5:2; Psa_32:6; Psa_72:15; Psa_106:30, “to judge”), we find the noun tepillāh (H8605) some thirty-two times. In its first occurrence, for example, David prays, “Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: thou hast enlarged me when I was in distress; have mercy upon me, and hear my prayer” (Psa_4:1). There is a man who is dependent upon God.
Another Hebrew word translated prayer, however, is śiyach (H7879), which appears fourteen times in the OT, five of which are in the Psalms, and speaks of contemplation and meditation. Its primary meaning, however, is actually “complaint,” which might seem odd at first. The idea, however, is not complaining in the sense of blaming God, rather deep meditation brought on by distress and urgent need. Job, for example, used this very word in the midst of his suffering (Job_7:13; Job_9:27; Job_10:1; Job_21:4; Job_23:2), as did David in his distress when he hid in a cave from Saul (Psa_142:2; cf. Psa_64:1; Psa_102:1). Prayer is David’s “battleaxe and weapon of war,” writes Charles Spurgeon; “he uses it under every pressure, whether of inward sin or outward wrath, foreign invasion or domestic rebellion. We shall act wisely if we make prayer to God our first and best trusted resource in every hour of need.”
Still another word for prayer in the OT is šā’al (H7592), which appears about 170 times and is also found in Akkadian, Ugaritic, and even “in the Aramaic of Daniel and Ezra (Dan_2:10-11; Dan_2:27; Ezr_5:9-10; Ezr_7:21).” It simply means “to ask something of someone,” whether one is just asking a question (Gen_32:17), making a simple request (Jdg_5:25), or even begging (Pro_20:4).
An integral part of prayer, then, is inquiring of and asking God, not just for things, but for guidance, strength, and all else. While we no longer ask the Urim and Thummim (Exo_28:30) for guidance, let us be like David who often “enquired of the LORD” (1Sa_23:2; 1Sa_30:8; 2Sa_2:1; 2Sa_5:19; 2Sa_5:23; 1Ch_14:10; 1Ch_14:14). We never demand anything in prayer; rather we “ought to say, If the Lord will, we shall live, and do this, or that” (Jas_4:15).
Scriptures for Study: What wonderful thing does the psalmist ask for in Psa_27:4-9 (“desired” in Psa_27:4 is šā’al)? Note how Mat_6:31-33 is illustrated in Psa_105:40 (“asked” is šā’al).

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David’s Prayer and Praise


2 Samuel 7:18-29
“Then went king David in, and sat before the Lord, and he said, Who am I, O Lord God? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?” 2 Samuel 7:18.

When God established His covenant with David, He reminded him that, when God chose David, he was simply a humble shepherd keeping sheep. It was God’s idea to elevate him from a keeper of sheep to the king of Israel. David realized that he had done nothing to promote himself to his position of prominence and did not deserve this kind of recognition. He rightly asked, “Who am I, O Lord God? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?” (2 Sam. 7:18).
In today’s culture, it is easy to cultivate an attitude of entitlement. Success and fame are almost expected by everyone and certainly are pursued by the majority of people. This attitude goes against the grain of Christianity because, in Christ, we begin with an understanding that we are not entitled.
Jesus came to this earth precisely because we are unable to help ourselves and none of us deserves Heaven. We only enter into a relationship with God through Jesus Christ after we have realized our desperate circumstance. David realized his humility, and we need to take note. The next time you are tempted to boost your own pride or take credit for anything good that has happened to you, take a cue from David and, instead, lift up God in praise. None of us deserves to be called the children of God, and, yet, He still reaches out to us and lifts us up from the pit.

JUST A THOUGHT
Will you deflect praise to God today?
Mark Clements

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Prayer That Perfects


 

Hebrews 5:7-10

 

Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared,” Hebrews 5:7.

 

Prayer That Perfects

 

Intense, sweaty, stomach churning, heart breaking, face to the ground praying occurred in the garden that cool evening by the Son of Man. Luke describes the prayer of Jesus as agony. “And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground” (Luke 22:44). Jesus, God the Son, was not afraid of dying, nor was He afraid of the suffering He would soon face, and, yet, in His human flesh He felt the overwhelming sense of the burden of sin He must bear for all. His heart ached knowing that the Father must turn His face away while He bore the sins of humanity.

 

While Jesus poured His heart out to God the Father, His disciples slept. But the loving Father touched by the prayer of His Son sent an angel to minister to Him. Even though, Jesus felt every ounce of sin placed on Him because He was sinless. He still loves us so much that He was willing to bear sin for us. His heart was broken for us. “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him” (2 Cor. 5:21).

 

 

Reflection

 

The sufferings of Jesus were necessary. Through them He related to the suffering of mankind to the fullest human extent.

 

Beverly Barnett

 

 

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Importance of Prayer


 

And it came to pass in those days, that he went out into a mountain to pray, and continued all night in prayer to God,” Luke 6:12.

 

What if your boss gave you an assignment and told you the project was so important that if you failed, the entire company would go under? Talk about pressure! If it were me, I would probably spend a great deal of time with my boss, trying to understand his vision for the project, asking wisdom and advice from him about how to be successful and asking his opinion about which employees I should work with to guarantee the success of the venture.

 

The assignment Jesus received from the Father was critical to the success of God’s redemptive plan for the world. Not only was Jesus required to follow God’s plan that led Him to suffer the agony of Calvary, but also He was given the task of leaving His church in capable hands. What did Jesus do?  He prayed. The Son of God spent hours and hours in prayer with God the Father. Jesus needed quality time with His Father to align His purpose with God’s purpose and to be filled with power and conviction to follow through. That is what prayer is. It is a time to communicate with the Father and find vigor and passion to fulfill the plans He has for us, partnering with Him and laying our own plans aside.

 

JUST A THOUGHT - Will you partner with God in prayer today?

 

Mark Clements

 

 

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112– April 22 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Prayer and a Biblical Educator

 

 

James Petigru Boyce was a fine scholar and very popular in his ways. He received his college education when it was not unusual for students and faculty to meet for prayer every evening. The spiritual welfare of Boyce became of great concern to some of his fellow students, and he became the object of special prayer that his gifts and graces might all be consecrated to Christ.

 

Shortly after one of these times of special prayer and fasting, Boyce took a ship from New York to Charleston, South Carolina. During this long journey, it was observed that he spent a great deal of time in his stateroom. A friend discovered that he was reading his Bible, and after much discourse together, Boyce came under deep conviction. Upon reaching the city, he found that his sister was also concerned with her spiritual welfare and that a close friend had just made his profession of faith.                                    Dr. Richard Fuller was preaching in the city with great effect, and a spiritual awakening was under way. Boyce’s conviction of sin increased, and he felt himself a ruined sinner and looked to the merits of Jesus Christ alone for his salvation. On April 22, 1846, he was baptized on that profession of faith. Boyce graduated from Brown University in 1847 and studied theology at Princeton from 1848 to 1851.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart from:  This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, p. 1623

 

 

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LINKED WITH HIM


When I feel still and very empty,
I try to turn my thoughts to prayer,
A little light turns on inside
And suddenly my God is there.

My doubts come from their stony places, He turns each one into a flower,
My heart gets into heaven’s gate,
I’m linked again with Him in prayer.

Marion Schoeberlein

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Clever Woman Tells the Funniest Prayer About Getting Old


Clever Woman Tells the Funniest Prayer About Getting Old.

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