Tag Archives: pastor

ELECTRONIC WORSHIP


IPAD
PASTOR: “Praise the Lord!”

CONGREGATION: “Hallelujah!”

PASTOR: “Will everyone please turn on their tablet, PC, iPad, smart phone, and Kindle Bibles to 1 Cor 13:13.

And please switch on your Bluetooth to download the sermon.”

P-a-u-s-e……

“Now, Let us pray committing this week into God’s hands.

Open your Apps, BBM, Twitter and Facebook, and chat with God”

S-i-l-e-n-c-e
“As we take our Sunday tithes and offerings, please have your credit and debit cards ready.”
“You can log on to the church wi-fi using the password ‘Lord909887. ‘ “
The ushers will circulate mobile card swipe machines among the worshipers:
Those who prefer to make electronic fund transfers are directed to computers and laptops at the rear of the church.
Those who prefer to use iPads can open them.
Those who prefer telephone banking, take out your cellphones to transfer your contributions to the church account.
The holy atmosphere of the Church becomes truly electrified as ALL the smart phones, iPads, PCs and laptops beep and flicker!

Final Blessing and Closing Announcements…
This week’s ministry cell meetings will be held on the various Facebook group pages where the usual group chatting takes place. Please log in and don’t miss out.
Thursday’s Bible study will be held live on Skype at 1900hrs GMT. Please don’t miss out.
You can follow your Pastor on Twitter this weekend for counseling and prayers.
God bless you and have nice day!

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71 – March – 12 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

He preached politics from the pulpit

1807 – Samuel Stillman, Pastor of the First Baptist Church of Boston during the Revolutionary War died on this day at seventy years of age.  He was converted to Christ and baptized under the ministry of Oliver Hart when his parents moved to S.C.  He later founded a Baptist Education Society in Charleston.  Always weak in health he moved back to N.J. to improve his physical condition.  He was called as the assistant pastor of the Second Baptist Church of Boston.  After one year, he became the pastor of the historic First Baptist Church of that city on Jan. 9, 1765 where he stayed until his death.  The Baptists, with only two or three exceptions stood solidly behind the Revolution.  Stillman was one of the strongest proponents.  His heart blazed for liberty.  He despised the Stamp Act and preached against it from his pulpit.  He was outraged over the inflicted Baptists of Ashfield, Mass., and authored a petition to the general court against it.  The issue had to do with a general assessment for the support of the state church (Congregational).  He was a powerful preacher who drew crowds from great distances including dignitaries such as, Washington, Adams, John Hancock, and Gen. Knox.  He lifted high the cross, preached sin black, and hell hot and saw great revivals.  His flock was scattered during the war but he returned, gathered them together again, and First Baptist was the only church in Boston that stayed open for the duration.  The forty-two years he spent in Boston covered the great debates of the Revolution, the war itself, the birth of the nation, the Federal Constitution, and the presidencies of Washington, Adams, and Jefferson.  Samuel Stillman was a remarkable man for remarkable times.  But history shows that God always has His man for the times.

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51 – February – 20 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Andrew Gifford

 

He endured to the end

 

1737 – BAPTIST PASTOR TESTIFIES OF THE PEACE OF CHRIST AT THE TIME OF DEATH IN LATE 18TH CENTURY ENGLAND – Pastor Andrew Gifford and his congregation dedicated a new facility in Eagle Street, Red Lion Square London on February 20, 1737.  He had served as an assistant pastor in both Nottingham and Bristol before becoming pastor of the Little Wild Street Church in London on Feb. 5, 1729.  Because of difficulty a majority of the members left in 1736 which led to the new church edifice mentioned above.  Andrew was born into a godly home in Bristol, England, August 17, 1700.  His father, Emmanuel Gifford, had suffered much difficulty because of his dissenting principles, and his grandfather had been imprisoned four times because of his biblical faith.  Andrew received Christ and was immersed at 15.  Pastor Gifford served the flock on Red Lion Square for nearly 50 years and the building had to be enlarged twice to accommodate the crowds.  Gifford was recognized for his knowledge of ancient manuscripts and coins.  His own collection of rare coins was the most valuable in Great Britain and King George II purchased it for his own.  In 1754 he received the Doctor of Divinity Degree from Marischal College, Aberdeen, and in 1757 he was appointed assistant librarian of the British Museum.  He was a warm friend of George Whitefield and preached for him many times.  Three days before he died, he said, “I am in great pain, but, bless God, this is not hell! O, blessed be God for Jesus Christ!”  When the end was near, he whispered, “O, what should I do now, if it were not for Jesus Christ!” What should I do now, if it were not for an interest in Jesus?” He died on a Saturday morning, June 19, 1784, and was buried in Bunhill, July 2, at 6 am. John Ryland brought the message.  There were 200 ministers and a vast crowd present.  He bequeathed his library and manuscripts to the Bristol Baptist College.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 70.

 

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44 – February 13 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

John_Leadley_DaggJohn L. Dagg

He was an overcomer

1794 – A BAPTIST OVERCOMES SIGHT AND VOICE IMPAIRMENT TO BECOME A GREAT PASTOR AND PRESIDENT OF MERCER U IN THE 19TH CENTURY – John Dagg was born in Virginia on February 13, 1794. As a young lad he pursued his studies and mastered Latin, Greek and Hebrew by candlelight permanently impairing his vision. In later years he had to be assisted in both reading and writing. He personally testified to obtaining a “joyful” sense of acceptance with God on his 15th birthday and was baptized in 1813 at 19 years and began to preach three years later at 22 and was ordained a year later. For several years he pastored small Baptist churches in his home state and compensated his income by teaching school. In 1825 he accepted the call to the prestigious Sansom Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia where he succeeded the beloved Dr. William Staughton. Dagg not only had problems with his eyes but was further handicapped by a terrible fall, in his twenties. At times he was housebound and could hardly minister to his people, but with a strong spirit he continued on to serve God. His trials continued however when he developed throat problems and could not speak above a whisper which forced his retirement from the church after nine years. With an invincible will he moved to Tuscaloosa, AL, and took charge of the Alabama Female Atheneum, and although he had never received a formal education, in 1844 he was appointed President of Mercer University in Macon, GA. The 12 years while he was President brought great advancement to the theological department, where he also taught. However, with advancing age, he resigned in 1856. But his work was not done. Retiring to Alabama, Dr. Dagg in 1857 published his Manual of Theology. This volume became most influential in directing the theology of the Southern Baptists. Dagg wrote, “We yield everything which is not required by the Word of God; but in what this word requires, we have no compromise to make.” He was called home on June 11, 1884 at 90 years of age.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 60.

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115 – April 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


An Exciting Missionary Adventure

The die was cast on April 25, 1844, when Richard Fuller, prominent pastor from Charleston, South Carolina, presented a resolution at the Triennial Convention to restrict its action to missions and not to become involved in the problem of slavery.  From 1814 until 1845, missionary efforts had been primarily made through the Triennial Convention, but in 1845 the split between North and South occurred.  However, Baptist associations in various states had formed small, independent mission agencies as well.  Richard Henry Stone, born in Culpeper county, Virginia on July 17, 1837, he was sent as a missionary by a Georgia association to serve the Lord in Africa.  He united with the Salem Baptist church in Culpeper County and answered the call of the Baptists in Georgia for a missionary to Africa, he and his wife Susan sailed out of Baltimore on November 4.  They were three months on the journey, and landed at Lagos.  They disciplined themselves to learn the Ijayte language, but with failing health, the couple was forced to return to the States.  Mr. Stone then joined the confederate army, and served as a chaplain with the 49th Georgia, Benning’s Brigade.  In 1867, with the completion of the war, Mr. Stone returned to Africa and Lagos for two years.  The last twenty years of Mr. Stone’s life were spent in Virginia and Kentucky where he supported his family by teaching.  Mr. stone died on October 7, 1894, and he was buried in the Fairview Cemetery in Culpeper.

Dr. Dale R. Hart adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins) p.p.  239   –   241

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15 – January 15 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

Who is the real slave?

 

1838 – The British Baptist Union wrote to the ministers of the Baptist churches in the U.S. urging them to use their influence to bring about full emancipation. The practice of slavery had been introduced into Virginia in 1619 and was, at first, resisted by the southern colonies. However in time, the tragedy of slavery became the most divisive issue ever to face our nation. Baptist leaders divided severely on the matter. J.H. Hinton, chairman, wrote: “We have not been ignorant that slavery existed in the States, entailed, we are humbled and ashamed to acknowledge, by British influence, authority and example. But we had, until of late, no conception of the extent to which multitudes of professing Christians in your land, by indifference, by connivance, by apology, or by actual participation are implicated in it.” Isaac Backus, who became famous as a Baptist pastor and historian, was raised in the Standing Order of New England (state church). Yet the family owned a slave and an Indian girl apprenticed as a servant. The famed diary of Backus reported the death of a slave of one of the members of the church in Middleborough, Massachusetts in the mid-eighteenth century. Two things were involved in shifting the slave population to the South. The cold winters made slavery unprofitable and the invention of the cotton gin in 1793 made the institution of slavery to be profitably utilized. But we must ever remember that Jesus told us who the real slave is: He said “Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin. He also said, “If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.”
Dr. Greg J. Dixon; adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 20-21.

 

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06 – January 06 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Blest be the tie that binds…”

 

1740 – John Fawcett was born, who later became the pastor of the Baptist Church at Wainsgate, England. He had been converted under the preaching of George Whitefield. At age 19 he had been baptized into the fellowship of the Baptist Church at Bradford. His ordination took place in 1765, when he became the pastor at Wainesgate. Six years later Dr. John Gill died, leaving the famed Baptist church at Southwark, London, without a pastor. Fawcett was offered the position, but upon news of their leaving Wainesgate, the congregation was filled with grief. In those days it was rare for a pastor to move, and he would live and die among the people that he served in the gospel. When the fateful day came, a van was sent from London to remove their belongings. Tearful men and women stood around and watched them carry the pastor’s things to the van. Mrs. Fawcett went back into the home weeping, and said to her husband, “I know not how to go.” He replied, “Neither do I.” At that they ordered the things to be taken off the van and placed back in the house. After the moving men and the good people had left them alone, John Fawcett sat down and wrote the beloved hymn: “Blest be the tie that binds, Our hearts in Christian love; The fellowship of kindred minds; Is like to that above.” In later years he became a Dr. of Divinity and was invited to be the Principal of Bristol College, but he died as he had lived, among his own people. King George III having read some of his writings contacted to ask him if he could do anything for him, which he declined. Later his influence with the King was used to save a man from being executed, and several others from heavy legal penalties.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon; adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 08-09.

 

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03 – January 03 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Journeycake, Charles

 

He was a Pastor and Diplomat

 

1894 – Rev. Charles Journeycake died having been born Dec. 16, 1817. The following words  are inscribed on the white marble monument in the old cemetery at Lightning Creek that marks his burial spot: “A kind and loving father and a friend to the needy; he died as he lived, a pure and upright man, after many years’ faithful in the ministry and as chief advisor for his people, the Delawares.” He was the son of a full blooded Delaware Indian father and a Caucasian mother named Sally who spoke English and several Indian dialects. She was an expert interpreter and when a Methodist mission was started among the Wyandottes Sally interpreted. Sally was gloriously saved through the influence of this ministry and Charles was then saved in 1833 and became the first Delaware to be baptized. Soon both of his parents were baptized and they became the nucleus of a Baptist church among the Delawares. In a few years Journeycake began preaching to his own people and to the Wyandotte, Seneca and Ottawa tribes. He was ultimately elected as the principal chief of his tribe and became an influential negotiator with the U.S. Gov. In all he made twenty-four trips to Washington, D.C. He was not ordained until he was 55, but only then at the insistence of his people. The church he pastored among the Delawares had more than 100 members. They dedicated a new building on Sep. 22, 1872. Journeycake continued to preach revivals and from 1871 through 1880 he baptized 266.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 04-05.

 

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01 – January 01 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Posted: 31 Dec 2013 05:50 PM PST

 

Kiokee BaptistKiokee Baptist Church

 

 

The Southern Baptist Convention begins

 

1771 – Daniel Marshall moved to Georgia, and by the spring of 1772, he had led a small congregation in the formation of the First Baptist Church of Kiokee and served as pastor until his death in 1784. A Georgia law of 1757 prohibited any worship not “according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church of England,” but Marshall led a “brush arbor” service. As he bowed in prayer, he was interrupted by a heavy hand on his shoulder and the declaration, “You are my prisoner!” The 65 year old preacher stood to his feet only to hear the young constable inform him that he had, “preached in the parish of St. Paul.” Mrs. Marshall quoted scripture which the Lord used to bring about the official’s conviction and conversion. The Court ordered Marshall to leave the Province of Georgia. His son remembered that he quoted scripture, “Whether it be right to obey God or man, judge ye,” and he went on his way preaching with great power. This boldness bore fruit, for the 21 year old constable, Samuel Cartledge was gloriously saved and in 1777 was baptized. After serving as a deacon in 1789, Cartledge was ordained to preach and ministered in Georgia and S.C. until his death at 93. One of his preacher descendants has referred to him as, the “Colonial Saul of Tarsus.” The Separate Baptists were led  primarily by three men; Shubal Stearns, in North Carolina, Daniel Marshall, in Georgia, and Samuel Harriss, in Virginia. It was because of their labors that caused the proliferation of the Baptists in the south and the growth of the Southern Baptist Convention.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon,  adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 01-02.

 

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361 – Dec. 27 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Results of Baptist missions in Italy

 

 

1832 – Dr. George Boardman Taylor was born, and when the call came for service in Italy he was already forty-one years of age. By then he had been educated at the University of Virginia and had served as pastor of churches in Baltimore, MD, and Staunton, VA. He was a chaplain during the Civil war having served in the Twenty-fifth Virginia Regiment under General Stonewall Jackson and had been wounded in battle. In 1880 Rev. and Mrs. J.H. Eager joined them in the ministry. However the mission suffered a setback in March of 1884 because of the death of Mrs. Taylor, which was deeply felt by all. By 1899 some fourteen churches had been founded on the Island of Sardinia and the cities of Rome, Milan, Venice, Bologna, and Naples. Also the missionaries reported that new stations were constantly being opened, and baptisms were more frequent than ever before, and the people were more eager to listen to the Word. Dr. Taylor’s labors continued thirty-four years until he was called home on Sept. 28, 1907, and then his son-in-law, Dexter G. Whittinghill, who had arrived in 1901 to assist him, was able to continue on with the mission. In 1923 the work had prospered to the point that there were fifty-seven churches with just over 2,300 total members. In 1863, James Wall and Edward Clark, two Baptists from England went to Italy. In 1845 Dr. William N. Cote was the first to go from America. Dr. Cote, with the help of an Italian convert, started the first Baptist church with eighteen members on Jan. 28, 1871. Problems then arose that caused Dr. Cote to resign, and Dr. Taylor was asked to take his place, and stabilize the work. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: 2000 A.D. pp. 709-10. George Braxton Taylor, Southern Baptists in Sunny Italy (New York: Walter Neal, Publisher, 1929), p. 30.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

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