Tag Archives: Napoleon

Napoleon, born August 15, 1769


Napoleon_in_His_StudyAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

After the French Revolution, a slave revolt resulted in France’s loss of Haiti (Saint-Domingue), one of the world’s main producers of sugar.

Desiring to replace it with another tropical colony in order to compete with Britain’s India, the French General Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798.

Napoleon defeated the Egyptian Mamluk slave cavalry in just a few weeks.

Napoleon then attempted to introduce democracy, equality and liberty but found there were no words in the Arabic language to convey such concepts, as they had been ruled for centuries by the sword.

Napoleon uncovered the Pyramid treasures, the Rosetta Stone and conquered into Palestine.

After losing the Battle of the Nile to Britain, he eventually had to return to France.

Napoleon, born AUGUST 15, 1769, then conquered across Europe – from Italy, Austria, Poland, and German States, to Holland, Denmark and Norway.

His military ‘envelopment’ tactic and use of mobile artillery resulted in him being considered one of the greatest military commanders of all time.

He spread the metric system and a civil-legal system – the Napoleonic Code – which emancipated Catholics in Protestant countries and Protestants in Catholic countries, as well as Jews across Europe.

Fearing Haiti’s slave rebellion would spread to the French Louisiana Territory, and badly needing money for his Army, Napoleon sold a million square miles of land to the United States in 1803 – the “Louisiana Purchase.”

Napoleon’s draining war in Spain inadvertently resulted in the Mexican War of Independence.

The loss of French troops retreating from Russia and his defeat at Leipzig led to Napoleon’s abdication and exile on the Island of Elba in 1813.

After a year, he escaped and again took control of France for 100 dates, but lost the Battle of Waterloo to Britain, June 18, 1815.

During the 17 years of Napoleonic Wars, an estimated 6 million Europeans died.

In October 1815, Napoleon was banished to the South Atlantic Island of Saint Helena, where he died in 1821 at the age of 52.

Reflecting on his life, Napoleon dictated his “Mémoires” to General de Montholon, Baron Gourgaud and General Bertrand.

His conversations were recorded by Emmanuel de Las Cases in Memorial de Sainte Hélène (published 1823).

Napoleon had complained to Montholon of not having a chaplain, resulting in Pope Pius VII petitioning England to allow Abbé Vignali to be sent.

Napoleon read out loud the Old Testament, the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.

Affirming his belief in God, Napoleon told Montholon:

“I know men; and I tell you that Jesus Christ is not a man.

Superficial minds see a resemblance between Christ and the founders of empires, and the gods of other religions. That resemblance does not exist.

There is between Christianity and whatever other religions the distance of infinity…

His religion is a revelation from an intelligence which certainly is not that of man.

The religion of Christ is a mystery which subsists by its own force, and proceeds from a mind which is not a human mind.

We find in it a marked individuality, which originated a train of words and actions unknown before…”

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Napoleon continued:

“Jesus is not a philosopher, for His proofs are miracles, and from the first His disciples adored Him.

Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon what foundation did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force!

But Jesus Christ founded His upon love; and at this hour millions of men would die for Him.”

Napoleon had stated:

“The Bible is no mere book, but a Living Creature, with a power that conquers all that oppose it.”

Napoleon once told a Milan parish priest in 1797:

“Society without religion is like a ship without a compass.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Hebrew – Marriage (1)


 

bā‘al, lāqach, yāḇam, ‘’iššāh

 

Several Hebrew words are translated “married,” “marry,” or “marriage,” each of which provides insight into what this relationship should be biblically. One is bā‘al (H1166), which means “to marry, have dominion, or to rule over.” It is used, for example, to demonstrate political dominion (1Ch_4:22) as well as God’s dominion over His people (Isa_26:13), which in turn is pictured as a marriage (Jer_3:14). This does not mean a husband rules like a little Napoleon over his wife, rather that he leads in a godly way and cherishes her as his own body (Eph_5:25-29). It is used also in the contexts of both virginity (Isa_62:5) and adultery (Deu_22:22), the latter of which was punishable by death. These demonstrate that purity should be part of both the foundation and continuing structure of marriage.

 

Another word is lāqach (H3947), which is used more than one thousand times in a variety of ways. With the basic meaning “to take, to grasp, to take hold of,” it is used for Noah taking hold of the dove to bring it back into the ark (Gen_8:9), taking vengeance (Isa_47:3), or even figuratively for “taking on” commands, a metaphor for obedience (Pro_10:8). It is, therefore, easy to see the significance of taking a wife (Gen_25:1), as this word also includes the idea of keeping what one takes (Gen_14:21).

 

Another word is yāḇam (H2992), which specifically addresses the custom in the Mosaic Law called “levirate marriage” (Latin levir, “brother-in-law”), which required that upon his brother’s death, if there was not already a male heir, a man was to marry his brother’s wife so the family name could be passed on (Deu_25:5-10). Obviously, we have no such custom today, but it does at least illustrate the importance of having children.

 

One other word is ’iššāh (woman or “wife,” H802, February 5). It underscores that the woman is part of the man. God has instituted marriage to make two people into one person (Gen_2:24; Mar_10:6-8; Eph_5:31; 1Co_6:16) so they can function to the fullest. While God leads and empowers some Christians never to marry so they can more fully devote themselves to the Lord’s work (Mat_19:11-12; 1Co_7:7-9), the general rule is marriage. Let us each cherish the one-person relationship God has given us.

 

Scriptures for Study: There was much Scripture mentioned in today’s study. Read those verses that particularly interest you, and consider the critical importance of marriage.

 

 

 

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