Tag Archives: Lord

Great Is His Mercy


Psalms 103:8-14
“The Lord is merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and plenteous in mercy,” Psalm 103:8.

Looking outside my window, a little, brown sparrow scratches the ground until she finds a tasty bug, then with the dinner in her beak off she flies, no doubt, to feed hungry baby birds waiting in the nest. God loves that bird and her little family and provides for them, but He loves us more.
God loves us with a love that cannot be measured with human instruments and from that love His mercy flows—rich, full to overflowing. King David benefited from His mercy, and God allowed him to write about that bountiful mercy—for our sake—to remind us that we, too, are the benefactors of His great mercy.
God shows us mercy every day. When we deserve punishment, He gives us training (Psalm 103:2-5). He gives us His Word to light our path (Psalm 119:105). He is our hiding place and our shield (Psalm 119:114). His mercy is everlasting (Psalm 103:17).
My friend, never allow Satan to convince you that God does not love you! He loves you more than any of His creation, and He shows it by the great mercy He bestows on you each day.

REFLECTION
For thou, Lord, art good, and ready to forgive; and plenteous in mercy unto all them that call upon thee (Psalm 86:5).

Beverly Barnett

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In Every Thing


“Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God,” Philippians 4:6.

One important lesson a mature Christian learns is that no problem or situation is too small to take to the Lord in prayer. Albert Barnes states, “There is nothing which pertains to body, mind, estate, friends, conflicts, losses, trials, hopes and fears, in reference to which we may not go and spread it all out before the Lord.”  We take time to pray for great needs or answers to serious situations but suppose we start our day with prayer that does not end until we conclude it with amen before we close our eyes at night. Throughout the day we keep the prayer line open to Heaven which includes an attitude and words of thankfulness toward God for His graciousness.
We, however, often let other things steal our time and attention toward God. Praying to God makes us keenly aware of His hand on every aspect of our lives. What if, before we take a step toward the door, we take the time to whisper a prayer of thankfulness for safety, for guidance over our thoughts and intentions and for others. “Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplication for all saints” (Eph. 6:18).

REFLECTION
Prayer is a free benefit of a gracious God; do not waste another day without using it.
Beverly Barnett

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HELP, SIDEBOARDS NEEDED


Author – William Andrew Dillard

Parson to Person
What am I ever going to do with all the blessings being heaped upon me? I live in a sinful body, under a sinful system. But the grace of the altogether lovely Lord and Savior, Christ Jesus by which I am eternally saved has also led me down the narrow road which His Word affirms to be correct. From other pathways, the moans and groans of sinners in the pain and agony of a life gone awry play loud and clear from community to global scenes. How I wish they knew Whom I know; what I know, and had the blessings I experience every day.
When one walks in the narrow path of the Lord, the blessing attendant to that life abound on every side. They become numerous, even mountainous in abundance. the Psalmist said, “Blessed be the Lord, who daily loadeth us with benefits, even the God of our salvation, Selah” Psalm 69:18 In the maze of normal life events, he cautioned himself and us to not get lost in temporal things saying, “Bless the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits.” Psalm 103:2.
Most everyone has a story to tell about someone they know who has fallen in the quagmire of sin, so why would I not be next? I think of His benefits toward me. I was given godly parents; exposed to the Word early and consistently. I have a loving Savior Who died for me. I have a faithful wife and dear children and grandchildren who love me and look up to me. I have a ministry that God called me to perform faithfully. I have a loving church to preach to and who hears my weekly messages. I live in a country where I am still free to worship God as the Bible teaches me I should. I have the blessed privilege of investing time, money, and life into His service, and He tells me that investment will net one hundredfold. The reality of my life is: Help! I need sideboards to contain the abundance of blessings that just keep on coming.
It is little wonder then that Jesus said, “ Give, and it shall be given unto you; good measure, pressed down, and shaken together, and running over, shall men give into your bosom. For with the same measure that ye mete withal it shall be measured to you again.” Luke 6:38. How true it is! I am a very blessed man!
My prayer for you is that you will be blessed more than I am. If you think you are not so blessed, please stop now and meditate on Psalm One. It will put you on the pathway of life that requires sideboards. Even then, your containment capacity will not be sufficient.

Sideboards for Seniors

Sideboards for Seniors

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David’s Prayer and Praise


2 Samuel 7:18-29
“Then went king David in, and sat before the Lord, and he said, Who am I, O Lord God? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?” 2 Samuel 7:18.

When God established His covenant with David, He reminded him that, when God chose David, he was simply a humble shepherd keeping sheep. It was God’s idea to elevate him from a keeper of sheep to the king of Israel. David realized that he had done nothing to promote himself to his position of prominence and did not deserve this kind of recognition. He rightly asked, “Who am I, O Lord God? and what is my house, that thou hast brought me hitherto?” (2 Sam. 7:18).
In today’s culture, it is easy to cultivate an attitude of entitlement. Success and fame are almost expected by everyone and certainly are pursued by the majority of people. This attitude goes against the grain of Christianity because, in Christ, we begin with an understanding that we are not entitled.
Jesus came to this earth precisely because we are unable to help ourselves and none of us deserves Heaven. We only enter into a relationship with God through Jesus Christ after we have realized our desperate circumstance. David realized his humility, and we need to take note. The next time you are tempted to boost your own pride or take credit for anything good that has happened to you, take a cue from David and, instead, lift up God in praise. None of us deserves to be called the children of God, and, yet, He still reaches out to us and lifts us up from the pit.

JUST A THOUGHT
Will you deflect praise to God today?
Mark Clements

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The Kind of Christian I Am! – USTA WASERS ABOUND


BY: William Andrew Dillard
USTA WASERS ABOUND

A sobering insight is given to those with hearing ears in 2 Peter 2:20-21, “ For if after they have escaped the pollutions of the world through the knowledge of the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, they are again entangled therein, and overcome, the latter end is worse with them than the beginning. For it had been better for them not to have known the way of righteousness, than, after they have known it, to turn from the holy commandment delivered unto them.” Anyway one may stack it up, it is a most serious thing to turn away from the truth presented in the Holy Word after having received and understood it.
Still, the world of ustawasers sees no decline in population. It is appalling to note that most cults report the major number of proselytes they make come from a Baptist background. Once I had some legal work completed by a rotund, jolly fellow who upon learning of my religious standing roared, “I usta to be a Baptist!” Curiously, I asked what he was now. He replied, “Now, I am a ———. I “usta” to worry about living correctly, but now I don’t have to do that anymore. I let my priest take care of that.” Believe it or not, he was serious!
Having conducted more revival meetings than most ministers in a time when such was popular, I have personally witnessed to numerous wayward, backslidden and truth rejecting people who gave an intelligent testimony of their personal salvation, but whose common chorus was “I usta.” Sadly, they “usta” to be a Baptist, or they “usta” be a faithful church member; they “usta” read the Bible, engage in private prayer, etc. What a choir they would make, all singing “I usta!”
What happens to folks who become ustawasers? Perhaps they never did achieve a good comprehension of the faith once delivered to the saints. Regardless, once exposed to the ultimate truth of the Bible, they succumb to the temptation to follow the ways of men out of desire, or out of escape mode from ridicule. The amazing thing about most of them is that they tout their former state with seeming pride. “O, yes, I usta be…..” They have forgotten, perhaps wilfully, that we must ALL stand before the Creator God of the universe and give account of ALL the deeds done in the body whether they be good or bad. To me that is most sober! There will be no acceptable explanation for having turned from the Holy Commandment delivered from God Himself to us for our belief, understanding, and code of conduct. The only ustawaser I want to be noted for is that I “usta” be a subject for a devil’s hell, but Jesus saved me by grace through faith, and praise His name, I am not that anymore! This is the kind of Christian I am, and I hope it is true for you as well!

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Dedication of David’s House


 

Psalm 30:1-12

 

Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon me: Lord, be thou my helper,” Psalm 30:10.

 

I will never forget the overwhelming feeling of helplessness as I held our firstborn son in my arms for the first time. At first, I was not thinking about how awesome fatherhood is or how blessed I was to have a son. No, my very first thought was, I do not know what I am doing, and I have no idea how to be a dad! Since then, God has blessed us with three more children, and each day we are reminded that we are walking in uncharted territory, desperately dependent upon God to be patient with us, to protect us from ourselves and to intervene when we make mistakes.

 

As David sang this song at the dedication of his home, the verse that rings out the loudest is verse 10, in which David cried out, “Have mercy on me.” History tells us that David did not always make the best decisions, and his erroneous choices caused much hurt to himself and others. David was familiar with pain and understood the importance of God’s mercy.

 

Today, as we seek to build our homes and dedicate them to God’s honor and glory, may we never forget to daily cry out for God’s mercy. As long as we are in the flesh, we will make mistakes that cause hurt and pain to us and to others. We need a God who is patient with us and who will intervene on our behalf because of His steadfast love.

 

 

JUST A THOUGHT

 

Will you cry out for God’s mercy today?

 

Mark Clements

 

 

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HEBREW – Blessed


 

ešer

 

The very first word we read in the book of Psalms is blessed. The Hebrew here is ’ešer (H835), a masculine noun meaning a person’s state of bliss. It’s never used of God, rather always of people, and is exclamatory in emphasis, as in “O the bliss of . . .” Most of its forty-four appearances are appropriately in the poetry of Psalms and Proverbs.

 

It is extremely significant that the Septuagint translates ’ešer using the Greek makarios, which our Lord used nine times in the Beatitudes (Mat_5:3-11). Many Bible teachers say this word just means “happy,” which is always circumstantial. It actually speaks of the far deeper idea of an inward contentedness not affected by circumstances (Php_4:11-13).

 

Of the many occurrences of ’ešer, one that immediately strikes us is Psa_1:1 : “Blessed is the man,” where the unknown psalmist distinguishes two lifestyles (February 23), one that is blessed and one that is not. We find in Psa_1:1-3 three realities that produce genuine bliss and contentment:

 

First, a path that is holy. In three distinct statements, the psalmist outlines holiness. The holy person first does not stroll with the “ungodly” (rāšā‘, H7563) people. He doesn’t associate with, listen to, or join those who are guilty before God and transgressors of His Law. Second, the holy person does not stand with sinners. Way is derek (February 23), a marked-out pattern of life, and “standeth” is ‘āmaḏ (H5975), which figuratively indicates living somewhere, standing, remaining there (e.g., Exo_8:22, dwell). The holy life, then, is one that does not remain in sin (1Jn_3:9, where “commit” is present tense, to “continually habitually commit sin”). Third, the holy person does not sit with the “scornful” (liys, H3887) person, that is, one who boasts, scoffs, mocks, and derides, as in showing or expressing utter contempt, in this case for the things of God.

 

Second, blessedness comes from a passion for Scripture. The blissful and contented person is one who takes delight (February 29) in God’s Word and his meditation (January 6) on it is the rule of life and his daily priority.

 

Third, blessedness comes from a prosperity dependent upon God. The image of sitting by a river is a graphic one, picturing nourishment, growth, fruitfulness, and much more. While “prosperity teachers” promise monetary riches, true prosperity is found in the spiritual riches we have in Christ (Eph_1:3-23).

 

Scriptures for Study: Read the following verses, noting what else brings bliss and true contentedness: Psa_2:12; Psa_32:1-2; Psa_112:1; Psa_119:1-2; Psa_127:4-5; Pro_3:13 (“happy”); Pro_8:32.

 

 

 

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God’s Choice of King


 

1 Samuel 16:3-13

 

But the Lord said unto Samuel, Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart,” 1 Samuel 16:7.

 

 

When it was God’s timing for Israel to have a godly king, He sent Samuel to a man named Jesse to find and anoint the man God wanted to govern His people. To begin the search for the next king, Samuel started with Jesse’s son, Eliab, and Samuel thought, Surely he is the Lord’s anointed. According to Samuel’s own standards of kingship, Eliab must have fit the description. Immediately, however, God made it clear that Eliab had been rejected by Him. Jesse began bringing out his other sons, one after another, but each son was denied kingship by God. Finally, Samuel asked Jesse if all his sons were present, to which Jesse responded that his youngest son—David—was out keeping the sheep. When Jesse had David brought in to stand before Samuel, it became obvious that God had chosen him to be king.

 

What had they missed? Why were they off target so many times before David? It was not only because they were searching for a king that met their own human standards, but it was also because they had an inability to peer into the hearts of Jesse’s sons. The kind of people God uses to accomplish His will are people whose hearts are committed to His will. These may not be the best or the brightest according to worldly standards, but they are people who are chasing after God’s heart, like David
(1 Sam. 13:14).

 

JUST A THOUGHT

 

Will you chase after God’s heart today?

 

Mark Clements

 

 

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47 – February 16 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Baptism_

The importance of baptism

AN ANGLICAN BECOMES A BAPTIST AND WALKS 120 MILES IN WINTER TO BE BAPTIZED – Dan Taylor, was baptized on February 16, 1763 having walked 120 miles in winter to do so. Several Baptist ministers had refused to baptize him because of his belief in the unlimited atonement of our Lord, but he continued to search until he heard of a society of General Baptists in Lincolnshire. Taylor had begun working in the coal mines of England with his dad when he was just five.  He learned to read at an early age and often took a book with him into the heart of the earth.  He grew into a sturdy man but undersized which he blamed on not getting enough sunshine during his growing years. His family was not very religious, though members of the Church of England, but had Dan confirmed when he was 16. In a few years he became a lay Methodist preacher and delivered his first sermon in 1761 but his study of the bible led him to desire believer’s baptism. By the next autumn after his baptism he had become a General Baptist pastor in Wadsworth but he found that those churches were generally cold, and with his passion for souls he felt out of place. Withdrawing from the Association, Taylor with nine other ministers founded the Assembly of Free Grace General Baptists, which were nicknamed the “New Connection.” The group affirmed their faith in the natural depravity of man, the obligation of the moral law, the deity of Christ, the universal design of the atonement, the promise of salvation for all who believe, the necessity of regeneration by the Holy Spirit, and the obligation upon repentance of immersion. Taylor traveled 25,000 miles, mostly by foot, on preaching tours. He would average on those trips, 9 sermons per week. He believed that any day he did not preach was a failure. Fearing his sight was failing, he memorized a great portion of the N.T. He established an academy, which later became a college to train men for the ministry. He authored 45 publications, some sizeable volumes. He established the General Baptist Magazine in 1798 and served as its 1st editor. He died on Nov. 26, 1816 at 78. In 1791 the “New Connection” merged with the Baptist Union in England.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 64.

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The Gaze of Jesus


 

Luke 22:55-62

 

And the Lord turned, and looked upon Peter. And Peter remembered the word of the Lord, how he had said unto him, Before the cock crow, thou shalt deny me thrice,” Luke 22:61.

 

 

Just a few hours before the Gethsemane prayer meeting, Jesus admonished Peter to pray for spiritual strength, to be on guard because Satan wanted to use him. Peter, like many, depended on his physical strength rather than his spiritual strength. It is better if we depend on God; for when we are weak He is strong, and He will help us when we depend on Him (2 Cor. 12:9). Peter had not yet learned this truth. Admitting our weaknesses is the first step in becoming a stronger Christian.

 

Most Christians fit into one of two categories: the tested and the testers. The tested Christians have been flat on their backs, either literally or metaphorically, and have learned to reach up and out to God and that He will help them. God is willing and honored when they ask Him to lend them His strength. The testers think that they are stronger than the temptations and trials they face or will face. This false thinking leads down a broken hearted path. Peter seemed to fit into the second category. He learned the hard way that failure has a great cost.

 

The rooster crowed—Jesus looked straight into the heart of Peter—shame filled his heart and tears filled his eyes.

 

 

REFLECTION

 

After a good cry, confession and repentance, Peter became one of the most spiritually strong disciples of Jesus. The change began with the heart piercing, loving eyes of Jesus.

 

Beverly Barnett

 

 

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