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23 – Jan. 23 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


His last words were, “SWEET HOME,”
 Charles Dutton Mallary was born in West Paultney, Rutland County, Vermont, on Jan. 23, 1801.  He had deeply pious parents, especially his mother.   He experienced the saving grace of Christ when he was sixteen during a revival.  He was immersed into the fellowship of the Baptist church in West Paultney, Clark Kendrick pastor, in June of 1822.  He graduated from Middlebury College in August 1817 and taught school for a year.  He became burdened to preach the gospel and relocated in Charleston, S.C. where he began preaching and became licensed by the local church, and in 1824 received a call to pastor the First Baptist Church of Columbia, S.C., where he was ordained.  On July 11, 1825 he married Miss Susan Mary Evans, the maternal granddaughter of the eminent preacher, Edmund Botsford.  Susan died in 1834.  He married again in 1840 to Mrs. Mary E. Welch.  After two years he moved 20 miles southeast to pastor Beulah and Congaree Baptist Churches.  In 1830 he accepted a call to the First Baptist Church in Augusta, GA.  In 1834 he went to a church in Milledgevillle, GA, but because of poor health, only stayed for two years.  At that point he began working with Mercer University where he served as agent from 1837-1839.  With a passion to preach he accepted the position as Missionary for the Central Association.  This was the most effective time of his ministry when he preached great revivals in the central area of Georgia.  From 1840 – 1864 he lived in Twiggs and Sumter Counties and resided in Jeffersonville for many years ministering in a number of churches until 1848 when he was called to the LaGrange church, until 1852.  He moved to Albany and because of poor health was unable to pastor but preached until the end in 1864 at the age of sixty-four. His last words were,  “SWEET HOME,” (clapping his hands).
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 47-48.

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