Tag Archives: God

Extremism: A Hallmark of Christianity


A tremendous article by  Randall A. Terry

Extremist!”

This label is nearly as bad as the Scarlet Letter in many American Christian minds. Hostile unbelievers cast this insult like the first “without sin” stone on anyone who dares to take an uncompromising stand on issues. The fear of being condemned as an “extremist” has been so effective that many tepid Christian leaders in pastorates, seminaries and ministry leadership positions have joined Christianity’s enemies and launched their own quiet, thoughtful, reasoned attack on “extremism.”

 

The practical result of this is that battalions of young “Davids” sit fidgeting on the sidelines, while the King Sauls of the Church explain to the Davids why it is not God’s will to slay the Goliaths.

However, the charge of extremism – rather than an accusation to be ashamed of – is actually an accolade to relish and revel in; because without doubt Christianity is the ultimate extremist religion. No other religion, no other faith, no other deity even comes close. I submit that the war on extremism from inside or outside Christianity is ultimately a war on Christianity itself.

 

Consider the extremes of Christ’s attributes and offices.

 

He is the Lamb of God; he is the lion of the tribe of Judah.

He is the Prince of Peace;

He is the Man of War. A bruised reed He will not break;

He shatters the nations with a rod of iron.

Jesus weeps; He has eyes of fire.

He does not lift up His voice; out of His mouth goes a two edged sword.

Christ is the Savior; Christ is the Judge.

He made Himself a servant; He is the Master and Lord of all.

His kingdom is not of this world; He is King of Kings and all kings will bow at His feet.

He wore a crown of thorns; He offers a crown of life.

He is fully God; and He is fully man.

 

Those extremes nearly tore the “Christian” religion apart.

 

Reflect on God the Father.

God is love; God is a consuming fire.

God is light; God dwells in the thick darkness.

Jacob He loves; Esau He hates.

 

The extreme the mandates and the fruit of Christianity in our lives:

The Bible demands that we love our enemies; the Psalmist boasts of his perfect hatred for God’s enemies.

Christ promised to leave his peace with us; yet he declared he did not come to bring peace, but a sword.

Christ brings unity to Gentile and Jew; he divides a mother-in-law from her daughter-in-law.

He commands us to rejoice evermore; he adjures us to let our joy be turned to sorrow and our laughter to weeping.

 

God’s dealings with men and nations are equally extreme.

He will save the city for the sake of 10 righteous men; he destroys tens of thousands for the sin of one man.

One errant son loses Paradise by one act; one obedient son redeems the world by one act.

God forgives the woman taken in adultery; he kills the man for steadying the Arc of the Covenant with his hand.

He sends blistering drought in Elijah’s day; he drowns the world in Noah’s.

He brought the first son of David and Bathsheba to the grave; he brought their next son to the throne.

The Lord and the angels rejoice when sinners are converted; converted sinners will judge the angels.

 

Biblical heroes are a study in extremes.

David is the sweet Psalmist of Israel wedding poetry; David is the fierce

warrior who presents Goliath’s head to the king.

Elijah stands and conquers 400 prophets of Baal; he flees in terror at the word of one woman.

Abraham begs God for a son; then willingly offers him as a sacrifice until God intervenes.

Peter declares he will die for Jesus; within hours he denies he even knows him. Timid Gideon begs God for a sign; brave Gideon slays two kings on a stone. Saul of Tarsus kills Christians; he is finally killed for being one.

 

The extremes of Christianity may startle us; they may make some comfortable; but they are not contradictions.

The tightrope walker that balances his acts with a long pole holds but one pole. It is the extremes of that pole that keep them in balance. Should he favor one side of the pole and lop off the other, he could not maintain his balance–he would fall.

 

This is the plight of modern theologians and preachers. Having accepted the false notion of Christianity’s enemies that certain aspects of our God and faith are extreme (and therefore extremely embarrassing), they have lopped off the extremities that preserve them on precarious heights–and they have fallen; fallen into the safety net of fallen man’s opinions. But this safety net is actually a snare.

Having turned from the Harsh Master who reaps what he did not sow, they have enslaved themselves to harsher masters who sow the wind and reap the whirlwind. Our modern, sophisticated, would-be “heroes of the faith” slay no tyrants, conquer no kingdoms, risk no martyrdom. Instead, they get photos with tyrants, protect the status quo of the kingdom, and frequently martyr the reputations of their extremist brethren.

 

By trying to blend the heat of God’s mercy and the coldness of his judgment, the “balanced” have exchanged their glory for the similitude of a lukewarm, politically correct ox, fit only to be spewed out of Christianity’s mouth.

By the forced blending of God’s unapproachable light and the thick darkness in which he dwells, the moderates of Christianity have created the drab-grey-God who neither inspires wonder nor dread.

They have balance; the balance of a fixed, lifeless statue.

 

One achieves healthy balance by remembering both the goodness and severity of God; not by blending them into divine indifference. One maintains balance by accepting the extremes of black-and-white; not by creating a bland, grey divinity.

 

What Christianity’s detractors both inside and outside the church must accept is that Christianity is extreme – extreme to the wildest degree. Perhaps nothing reveals this extremism more than the final state of man. The righteous live in night-less light, the wicked are cast into outer darkness. The redeemed dwell in perpetual joy; the rebels weep and gnash their teeth forever. Those who die in friendship with Christ have eternal life; those who die rejecting His grace have eternal damnation. It does not get any more extreme than this.

 

Those who reject extremes must inevitably reject Christ and Christianity.

By rejecting the extremes of male and female, our seminaries have created religious eunuchs and barren heralds; neuters that cannot reproduce their kind. By castigating Christianity’s extremities, have castrated its vitality.

 

Please show to us the “balanced” moderate who has done anything great

in history. They have won no great battles, they have no tragic defeats. They

have no boast, they have no denials. They offer no heads of giants; their songs

are trite and predictable.

 

When moderates in the Church call for balance, they really want to lop off the embarrassing extremes of Christ, His Church, and His history. But by doing so, they make Christianity an embarrassment. It is no longer, “These men who have turned the world upside down have come here also…” but rather, “These men who want a place at the table have come to discuss compromises.”

 

Past enemies of the Gospel feared extremist Christians: “Now when they saw the boldness of Peter and John, and perceived that they were unlearned and ignorant men, they marveled; and they took knowledge of them, that they had been with Jesus.” Our modern leaders are learned, but not bold. Now our enemies marvel that Christian leaders won’t fight for Christianity; they take note that they have been with Balaam.

These new champions – pitiful eunuchs – inspire neither dread nor ecstasy, neither joy nor weeping. They inspire nothing, because only extremes inspire people. Mediocrity, gray, blandness… inspires no one. They cannot advance and conquer for Christianity, for they cannot even defend her. They are safe, and they are irrelevant or worse yet; they are relevant only as religious hostages to be paraded before enemies like trophies from a conquered kingdom. By the waters of Babylon they have sung skillfully. Unlike the three Hebrew children, they bow deeply.

Conquered brothers, captured sisters, be loosed of the chains of your safe, grey, lukewarm, mediocrity. Cease giving succor to the enemy. Your war on extremism is a war on Christianity itself, and you cannot win. Come, battle demons with us. Relish the exhilaration of triumphs; curse the hapless defeats.

 

You can only achieve great victories by risking great disasters.

Stop trying to give God a facelift; he doesn’t need your plastic surgery.

Stop trying to amputate the extremes of Christianity you find so embarrassing.

To the unbelieving rebels; behold the goodness and severity of God. If you repent and believe the gospel, you will receive forgiveness and mercy from the God who made you, and sent His Son to die for you. But if you continue to rebel, and die outside of God’s friendship, you will be judged. If you spurn His mercy, you will drink the terrifying cup of His wrath forever. And your accusations of Christianity’s extremes will taunt you for all eternity.

 

Finally, to young and old believers alike – who yearn for militancy in the

Church Militant – take this advice: flee the guidance of these barren doctors of divinity. Do not follow their lead into the ghetto of mediocrity. They will deliver you from extremes, but they will rob you of your strengths to deliver. They will inoculate you from the pain and anguish of childbirth, because they will sterilize you. Better to be in anguished labor for Christ than to be a quiet gelding for Jesus.

Rejoice in the boundaries of extremism. Rejoice in the God of extremes.

Find your balance in the extremes of Christianity.

 

Boldly declare:

 

 “I am an extremist!” and then live out that extremism to the extreme.

 

 

By Randall A. Terry

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HEBREW HONEYCOMB


 HEBREW HONEYCOMB

William Andrew Dillard
LIVING IN THE PRESENCE OF THE ALMIGHTY
The world has seen more than its share of philosophers, particularly of a religious nature. The stoics strive for indifference in pain or joy. The Gnostics know it all and cannot be taught. The Agnostics cannot know anything for sure and discount anyone who thinks he does. Pantheists see every form of life highest to lowest as being God manifest in those forms. Hindus and others believe in reincarnation: that living well advances the form of one’s next appearance, and living poorly the opposite. The Epicurean believes the pleasure of food and drink is God, and that one should gorge those things often. If the various strains of these and others similar to them appear to be endless, it is perhaps because they are.
The ancient Greeks saw God in the form of idols of stone and wood. Paul hit their philosophy head on in his great sermon on Mars Hill recorded in Acts 17. His presentation is God-given, and brilliant. It should be given meditation time by every modern Christian. Think about it!
As Paul made his profound presentation of the one, true, living God to the philosophers on Mars Hill, he capitalized on their acknowledgment that there was an “unknown God.” He further argued in the words of their own poets that we are the offspring of God, therefore, God could not be likened to gold, silver, stone graven by art and man’s device.
Perhaps the most astounding thing those philosophers heard, and a considerable number of folks today, too, is that He is not far from everyone of us. People put much stock in privacy. They just want to be secluded from everyone and everything at times. The idea is so pervasive that some actually feel they are truly alone in ultimate privacy. They would do well to review the 138th Psalm. The Psalmist’s basic question, verse 7, is “ Whither shall I go from thy spirit? or whither shall I flee from thy presence?” The ultimate answer is there is no such place in the universe. The eyes of the Lord run to and fro in the universe of men. There is no refuge from His presence. He is only a prayer away from cries of our heart, and His arms are outstretched to receive all who cry out to Him in repentance and faith. Paul nailed it. God is not remote, rather He is not far from everyone of us! How comforting always, and especially in this wonderful Christmas season.

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MY LORD – NAMES


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WRITE HIS NAME: SPELL IT CORRECTLY


WRITE HIS NAME: SPELL IT CORRECTLY

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person
More frequently recently I see in the writings of others a purposeful refusal to spell out correctly the name of God. This originates in Jewish quarters, but is often employed by Protestant writers and others who may simply think it pious to so reference the Almighty. Perhaps that needs to be rethought. So, think with me for a minute!
When Moses met God at the burning bush in the Sinai desert, he asked Him His name so he could reply to his brethren in Egypt. God told him, “ ‘eheyeh mah ‘eheyeh” (I shall become Whom I shall become). “Tell the children of Israel that ‘eheyeh (the becoming one) sent me to you.” Exo. 3:14. Then in Exodus 6:3, God told Moses that His name was “Yehovah” (Jehovah) a slight variation of the same term used in Exodus 3, and has the same meaning. Now here is the point in all of this.
Men far afield of a right relationship with God think themselves to be showing due reverence to deity by not calling or writing His name. Both Jew and some gentiles will write “G – d” instead of “God.” In dealing with the name “Jehovah,” they will refer to the tetragrammaton (four letters) of yodh, he, waw, he, (the Hebrew letters of the name) instead of writing it out or saying it, to show their piety (supposedly) toward God, when they are far removed from His teachings.
The names of living entities are important. Moses and the people of his day recognized this. He asked God for His name because he knew his brethren would ask that up front. So, names should be employed as nearly correct as possible. Although I respond to names I may not care for, and are not commonly used to address me, I still prefer to have my name written or spoken correctly. Most everyone does. How much better then is it that the name of God should be written or spoken as correctly as possible. He did not reveal Himself in the Old Testament by about sixteen names by which He met the needs of His people simply to have them all ignored. misspelled, or misused. In the New Testament, His name is Jesus. That name came from heaven’s messenger because He would save His people from their sins, Matthew 1:21. So when referencing the Creator/Redeemer, call Him by His Holy Name and get it right. It is God, Jehovah, Jesus. To try to show piety by the misuse of His name is to underscore hypocrisy while adding insult to the Deity being referenced.

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PEOPLE’S POLITICAL PLATITUDES


PEOPLE’S POLITICAL PLATITUDES 

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person

Every four years, the country suffers the deluge of political platitudes in sufficient quantity to ensure voter weariness. But, it is expected, and among those who actually think, most of the grand promises are taken with a grain of salt. However, in this context, it is troubling to note an apparent lack of understanding about the history of the nation and its relationship to God. It is oft heard that “America needs to return to God!” or some similar statement of the same import, except in recent political rallies where He has been booed. Really?
Looking back, in the early days of this country, Baptists were imprisoned for nothing more than preaching Bible truth. They were taxed against their will to build church houses of Protestant denominations. To be sure, the Lord’s churches have enjoyed a tremendous degree of freedom here, and flourished therein, but most of those freedoms came about because God blessed the consistent, pressing efforts of His people. Moreover, this also was not without undesirable repercussions.
So, in the general context of religious life, America is noted as a “Christian” nation. However, the persistent rejection of foundational ethics of Judeo-Christian origin, moral, ethical, and religious standards have been in more of a nose dive than on a slippery slope.
The bottom line is that as a nation, America has never been in step with God. The platitude of “America needs to return to God” would better be stated, “America needs to turn to God.”
It is still true that Satan is the god of this world. His power is such that he offered the kingdoms of this world to Jesus if only He would worship him. Was the offer legit? Surely it was, and had to be in order for it to be a temptation.
But it is demonstrably true that God had and has much to do with this country, much more than the country has to do with Him! It is lamentable, but Bible students have read the last chapter of the Holy Book. The sinking of nations into the cesspools of sin is a precursor to the return of Jesus. Meanwhile, how nice it would be if leaders would learn that “righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people!” Prov. 14:34 Still, it is not recommended that anyone hold his breath until this happens. When the voting is done reality continues until the next four year period. Truly, those who know God should pray for our country.

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LABOR AND LIGHT


LABOR AND LIGHT

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person
It is the Labor Day weekend. A foreigner might get the wrong impression from the way our phrases and titles are framed. It is not a special day to labor, but a day to rest from labor and reflect on the blessings of labor, and the God-given ability to do it. There are similarities between labor and light that come to mind. Think about it!
God’s people are to labor, in fact with much difficulty, to have and to walk in light, letting the light of their spiritual life shine in a darkened world. But we do not have a specific day set aside to just reflect on our Christian labor. Perhaps there is a reason for that. Perhaps it is because like resting from labor on Labor Day, we tend to cease from our Christian labor every day. Presently, the hourglass of time is fast running out of sand, and it is so important that spiritual labor be renewed. And just what might that be? Simply put, it is receiving light and walking in light. After all, “There’s a call comes ringing over the restless wave: send the light, send the light!” Jesus is light, and He is life. The repetitive biblical admonition to all who call on the name of the Lord Jesus Christ is to walk in light. It is there that we have fellowship with Him. It is there that our life reproves the darkness of sin and rebellion toward God. Moreover, we are not left to guess how such a walk is to be accomplished. David of old said, “Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path.” Psalm 119:105. John put it this way in I John 1:6-7: “If we say we have fellowship with him, and walk in darkness, we lie, and do not the truth: But if we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin.”
To walk (manner of lifestyle lived) necessitates action. Too many church members have made a profession of faith, but are doing little to nothing as a labor to advance in the light Jesus brought to men, and in which He continues to walk. How appropriate then it would be to not only be thankful for the ability to labor on this holiday, but to be thankful for the opportunity to labor spiritually; to walk in the light of truth as a workman who needs not to be ashamed, but who is able to rightly divide the word of truth.

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Parson to Person


REST FOR THE SOUL

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person
God provides marvelous, incomprehensible rest for the human soul for those who access it the one and only way; His way! Hebrews Chapters Three and Four speak of it in at least four angles of thought: 1) it was rejected; 2) it is presently experienced; 3) there is more of it to come; and 4) some presently come short of it.
The Hebrews, brought out of Egypt, rejected God’s rest through unbelief. This is not to say they were lost people, but they did not exercise ongoing faith in God and His way for them. Thus did they give up grace for law, and as a people never knew the great rest for the soul offered through the medium of faith in God’s Word and ways.
That rest is a current reality for those of God’s people who are submissive to Him in discipleship; who learn the blessed joys of the Word, and commit themselves to that knowledge. This is spoken of as one ceasing from his own labor, spiritually, and depending entirely on the labor of God Who has also ceased from His, because the works were finished from the foundation of the world (casting down of the cosmos). Understanding the symmetry, harmony and unity of the eternal Word is their priceless possession and ultimate possibility of rest for the soul.
Additionally, there is more of it to come as verse nine forthrightly states. When faith becomes sight and hope becomes reality, there will be total, undisturbed rest in all of the ongoing activities. Doubtless this is a reference to the coming millennial reign of Christ Jesus and the ensuing heaven age.
But the sad reality is that there are those who have believed in Jesus, but have stopped short of being a committed, learning disciple. This causes them to be uncertain in spiritual matters, and fodder for the glib, but erroneous preachments of an endless line of charlatans. Such a state of life as this is the devil’s playground, leading one from one heresy to another while all the time living in uncertainty about who they really are, and how God views them as being saved or lost.
The biblically taught reaction to this scenario is stated in 4:1. “Let us fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it.” To fear is not to be always in that state, but it is motivational to receive and to share the great truths of the Word, and the hope that lies in in the heart of God’s covenant people.

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A GREAT MAN ONCE SAID


A Great Man Once Said:

It is for us to dig the well, it is for God to send the rain and the water.

It is for us to plant the seed, it is for God to make it sprout and grow.

It is for us to cultivate the field, it is for God to give the harvest.

It is for me to witness, it is for God to give the increase, so save the soul.

When I have done the best I can, then God must do the rest, and He will.

Selected

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David’s Charge to His Son, Solomon


David’s Charge to His Son, Solomon

I Kings 2:1-12

Key Verse: “Be thou strong therefore, and shew thyself a man; and keep the charge of the LORD Thy God,” I Kings 2:2, 3.

David was a man after God’s own heart. Very simply that did not mean that David was without sin. It meant that when he did sin, he turned to God for forgiveness. He knew that forgiveness began with God. David was a sinner and committed some heinous sins. He confessed those sins to God and received forgiveness.

Now comes the time that all men experience. Death. He wants to leave some advice to Solomon who will follow David as King of Israel. “Be thou strong.” A simple piece of advice. Strength is what is needed to live life to its fullest before a righteous God. There are many trials and tribulations in this life. Strong living does not mean that we will not mourn events, be broken hearted, or suffer grief and indecision in this life. It means we will lay all our cares upon the LORD and depend upon Him to restore us to the Joy of serving God and living a life of honor.

Notice the part of the passage that says, “and shew thy-self a man:”. David knows that the man was given responsibility to guide the household in a Godly manner. He wanted Solomon to take his place before God and fulfill his duties to his family and nation in an appropriate manner. That means to lead the nation in a Godly manner and to take the lead in the family in worship in the house of God and in family devotion. I am always happy to the man take the lead in service and worship in the church. He then is shewing himself a man.

Keep the charge of the LORD thy God.” The LORD has given us many instructions for life, living, and serving Him. To the lost, its repent and believe on my Son for everlasting life. For those that are save and heaven bound it is live a life that is an imitation of Jesus Christ while he walked this earth. We have some excellent pointers from the sermon on the Mount in Matthew chapter 5, 6, 7. Matthew 5:1-12 gives us how our relationship with God and our relationship with man should be. The rest is directions for our life and how we should live. This was given to the church. A charge to be faithful and tell others about a Saviour is a charge that each of us should keep.

Thought – “A wise man will hear and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain unto wise counsels” (Proverbs 1:5).

James Candler

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Daniel Webster born JANUARY 18, 1782


The Moral Liberal

Defending the Judeo-Christian Heritage, limited government, and the American Constitution

Daniel Webster born JANUARY 18, 1782

Daniel Webster 2American Minute with Bill Federer

One of the five greatest Senators in U.S. history, the State of New Hampshire placed his statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

His career spanned almost four decades, serving as Secretary of State for Presidents William Harrison, John Tyler and Millard Fillmore.

His name was Daniel Webster, born JANUARY 18, 1782.

From a New Hampshire farm, he attended Dartmouth College and became the highest paid attorney of his day.

He fought the slave trade and negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which set the nation’s Northeast boundary.

When South Carolina threatened nullification, Daniel Webster stated:

“Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!”

When asked what the most profound thought was that ever passed through his mind, Daniel Webster responded:

“My accountability to God.”

At the age of 20, Daniel Webster served as the headmaster of Fryeburg Academy in Fryeburg, Maine, where he delivered a Fourth of July Oration in 1802:

“If an angel should be winged from Heaven, on an errand of mercy to our country, the first accents that would glow on his lips would be,

‘Beware! Be cautious! You have everything to lose; nothing to gain…’”

Daniel Webster continued:

“We live under the only government that ever existed which was framed by the unrestrained and deliberate consultations of the people.

Miracles do not cluster. That which has happened but once in six thousand years cannot be expected to happen often.

Such a government, once gone, might leave a void, to be filled, for ages, with revolution and tumult, riot and despotism.”

At the age of 70, just eight months before his death, Daniel Webster addressed the New York Historical Society, February 23, 1852:

“If we, and our posterity, shall be true to the Christian religion, if we and they shall live always in the fear of God, and shall respect his commandments, if we, and they, shall maintain just, moral sentiments, and such conscientious convictions of duty as shall control the heart and life, we may have the highest hopes of the future fortunes of our country…

It will have no Decline and Fall. It will go on prospering and to prosper.

But, if we and our posterity reject religious instruction and authority, violate the rules of eternal justice, trifle with the injunctions of morality, and recklessly destroy the political constitution, which holds us together, no man can tell, how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us, that shall bury all our glory in profound obscurity.

Should that catastrophe happen, let it have no history! Let the horrible narrative never be written!…”

Daniel Webster continued:

“We may trust, that Heaven will not forsake us, nor permit us to forsake ourselves.

We must strengthen ourselves, and gird up our loins with new resolution; we must counsel each other; and, determined to sustain each other in the support of the Constitution, prepare to meet manfully… whatever of difficulty, or of danger…or of sacrifice, the Providence of God may call upon us to meet.

Are we of this generation so derelict, have we so little of the blood of our revolutionary fathers coursing through our veins, that we cannot preserve, what they achieved?

The world will cry out ‘shame’ upon us, if we show ourselves unworthy, to be the descendants of those great and illustrious men, who fought for their liberty, and secured it to their posterity, by the Constitution of the United States…

We have a great and wise Constitution. We have grown, flourished, and prospered under it, with a degree of rapidity, unequaled in the history of the world.

Founded on the basis of equal civil rights, its provisions secure perfect equality and freedom; those who live under it are equal, and enjoy the same privileges…”

Daniel Webster added:

“The Constitution has enemies, secret and professed… They have hot heads and cold hearts. They are rash, reckless, and fierce for change, and with no affection for the existing institutions of their country…

Other enemies there are, more cool, and with more calculation. These have a deeper and more fixed and dangerous purpose…

There are those in the country, who profess, in their own words, even to hate the Constitution…

Friends of the Constitution must rally and unite…act, with immovable firmness, like a band of brothers, with moderation and conciliation… looking only to the great object set before them, the preservation of the Constitution, bequeathed to them by their ancestors.

They must gird up their loins for the work. It is a duty which they owe to these ancestors, and to the generations which are to succeed them…”

Daniel Webster concluded:

“Gentlemen, I give my confidence, my countenance, my heart and hand, my entire co-operation to all good men…who are willing to stand by the Constitution…

I hardly know…the manner of our political death… We shall die no lingering death…

An earthquake would shake the foundations of the globe, pull down the pillars of heaven, and bury us at once in endless darkness.

Such may be the fate of this country and its institutions. May I never live, to see that day!

May I not survive to hear any apocalyptic angel, crying through the heavens, with such a voice as announced the fall of Babylon,

‘Ἔπεσεν, ἔπεσεν, Αμερικη ἡ μεγάλη, καὶ ἐγένετο κατοικητήριον δαιμονίων, καὶ φυλακὴ παντὸς πνεύματος ἀκαθάρτου.’ (Greek: ‘Is fallen, is fallen, America the Great has become a habitation of demons and a hold for every unclean spirit.’)


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal Contributing Editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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