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47 – February 16 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


 

 

Baptism_

The importance of baptism

AN ANGLICAN BECOMES A BAPTIST AND WALKS 120 MILES IN WINTER TO BE BAPTIZED – Dan Taylor, was baptized on February 16, 1763 having walked 120 miles in winter to do so. Several Baptist ministers had refused to baptize him because of his belief in the unlimited atonement of our Lord, but he continued to search until he heard of a society of General Baptists in Lincolnshire. Taylor had begun working in the coal mines of England with his dad when he was just five.  He learned to read at an early age and often took a book with him into the heart of the earth.  He grew into a sturdy man but undersized which he blamed on not getting enough sunshine during his growing years. His family was not very religious, though members of the Church of England, but had Dan confirmed when he was 16. In a few years he became a lay Methodist preacher and delivered his first sermon in 1761 but his study of the bible led him to desire believer’s baptism. By the next autumn after his baptism he had become a General Baptist pastor in Wadsworth but he found that those churches were generally cold, and with his passion for souls he felt out of place. Withdrawing from the Association, Taylor with nine other ministers founded the Assembly of Free Grace General Baptists, which were nicknamed the “New Connection.” The group affirmed their faith in the natural depravity of man, the obligation of the moral law, the deity of Christ, the universal design of the atonement, the promise of salvation for all who believe, the necessity of regeneration by the Holy Spirit, and the obligation upon repentance of immersion. Taylor traveled 25,000 miles, mostly by foot, on preaching tours. He would average on those trips, 9 sermons per week. He believed that any day he did not preach was a failure. Fearing his sight was failing, he memorized a great portion of the N.T. He established an academy, which later became a college to train men for the ministry. He authored 45 publications, some sizeable volumes. He established the General Baptist Magazine in 1798 and served as its 1st editor. He died on Nov. 26, 1816 at 78. In 1791 the “New Connection” merged with the Baptist Union in England.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon, from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 64.

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47 – Feb. 16 – This Day in Baptist History Past


[he] walked 120 miles that he might obey the Lord’s command.

February 16, 1763 – Dan Taylor was baptized. He set out on foot in the winter and walked 120 miles that he might obey the Lord’s command. By the next autumn he had become a General Baptist pastor in Wadsworth. He was refused believer’s immersion by several because of his belief in the unlimited atonement of our Lord, but he continued his search and ultimately heard of a society of General Baptists in Lincolnshire. When only five Dan learned to read. He grew into a sturdy young man but blamed his shortness on not getting enough sunshine during his growing years. His family was not religious but claimed to be of the Church of England and Dan was confirmed when sixteen. However, a few years later he became a Methodist and was made a lay preacher. He delivered his first sermon in 1761, but his study in the Bible led him to request baptism of a Baptist minister. Soon Taylor found that the General Baptist Churches were cold,  and with his passion for souls, Taylor along with nine other ministers formed the Assembly of Free Grace General  Baptists, and they were generally called the “New Connection”. They affirmed their belief in the natural depravity of man, the obligation of the moral law, the deity of Christ, the universal design of the atonement, the promise of salvation for all who believe, the necessity of regeneration by the Holy Spirit, and the obligation upon repentance of immersion. Taylor traveled 25,000 miles, mostly by foot, on preaching tours. He would average nine sermons a week. Fearing that he was losing his eye sight, he memorized a great portion of the New Testament. He died on Nov. 26, 1816 at the age of seventy-eight, and without his leadership,  the “New Connection” movement merged with the Baptist Union in England.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 64-65.

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327 – Nov. 23 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


He became a great scholar

November 23, 1697 – Dr. John Gill was born, who was to become an influential leader among the Particular Baptists of England during the 18th Century. He became a great scholar in Latin, Greek, logic, Rabbinical Hebrew, and the book of Zohar, with their ancient commentaries. He produced many works, including a commentary on the whole Bible. He still is acknowledged among Baptists as one of the most profound scholars. Armitage says of him, “And yet, with all his ability, he was so high a supralapsarian, that it is hard to distinguish him from an antinomian. For example, he could not invite sinners to the Savior, while he declared their guilt and condemnation, their need of the new birth; and held that God would convert such as He had elected to be saved, and so man must not interfere with His purposes by inviting men to Christ. Under this teaching His church steadily declined, and after half a century’s work he left but a mere handful.” During the same period of time, many General Baptists embraced the extreme liberalism of Arian and Socinian views fostered by the apostasy of the state churches. Between 1715 and 1750 their churches fell from 146 to 65. But the exaggerated emphasis on election and predestination dried up the springs of evangelism in the Particular Baptists and their churches were reduced from 220 to 146. This decline changed in 1750 when the spiritual awakening began to sweep England and America and men like Andrew Fuller began to emphasize the “Gospel Worthy of All Acceptation.” It was Fuller who held the ropes in England, while Carey descended into the pit in India. May we learn that any truth taken to an extreme by rationalistic processes will become heresy that can lead to apostasy, and that always leads to the death of evangelism.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins /Thompson /, pp. 488-89.

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