Tag Archives: funeral sermon

233 – Aug 21 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

God’s True Trailblazers

 

1832 – Spencer Clack, his wife and six children were appointed to serve as home missionaries with the American Baptist Home Missionary Society for Missouri.  His annual salary was fixed at $400.  Less than eight months later Clack died in Palmyra, MO, of cholera.  On June 4, the day of his death, he wrote his last report to the society.  A portion follows, “Dear Bro. Going, I am dying.  Since my last communication to you, I have had much affliction in my family.  I want you to pay up my full salary for the year out—else my family must suffer.  My trust is in the Lord.  He is able to strengthen me and uphold me in my dying hour.  Don’t give up the ship.  You are engaged in a good cause, you will meet with opposition—fear not.  I have faithfully, honestly and conscientiously defended the cause—not with the object of making money, for I have sustained pecuniary losses; but for the glory of God and of His cause.  Say to all the Missionaries  to be faithful, and bear hardships as good soldiers of Jesus Christ…the mission is the cause of God.  My affectionate regard to the churches…tell Bro. Vandeman I want him to preach my funeral sermon in Palmyra…I am dying, into the hands of God I resign my spirit.”  The letter was signed by the man of God.  A few minutes later he breathed his last breath and two days later his wife died, leaving six small children destitute.  Such was the life of the home missionaries that blazed the trail and planted churches in the West in the early years of our Republic. [This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 457-458.] Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

 

 

 

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160 — June 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Imprisoned three times

 

The story of John Corbley is one of sacrifice and heroism. Born in Ireland in 1738, he came to America at the age of fourteen, settling first in eastern Pennsylvania, but later moving to Virginia, where he was soundly converted under the preaching of James Ireland. Shortly thereafter he became a Baptist preacher, and preached with such power that the Episcopal Establishment in Virginia considered him worthy of imprisonment, rewarding him shortly thereafter with a cell in the Culpeper jail. On the very site of that old jail there stands a thriving Baptist church today. When brought into court, John Corbley conducted his own defense, and was acquitted of all charges in 1768, although he suffered much abuse and physical violence later.

 

John Corbley was known as the ablest preacher of his day. For thirty years he directed the planting of Baptist churches in western Pennsylvania. Imprisoned three times and married three times, having buried two wives, these experiences of sunshine and shadow served only to deepen his spiritual life and magnify his usefulness. Active to the very end, he entered into rest June 9, 1803, his funeral sermon being preached by Elder David Phillips, pastor of the Peter’s Creek Baptist church. His mortal remains lie buried in the cemetery within the shadow of the old Goshen church, Whitley, Pennsylvania.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I. (Thompson/Cummins) pp. 237–238.

 

 

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