Tag Archives: faith

HEBREW HONEYCOMB


HEBREW HONEYCOMB

William Andrew Dillard
THE ESSENCE OF FAITH

Embraced by millions over the vicissitudes of time, but understood by none, the life-altering, heaven connection “faith,” abounds greater than the sum of all the ugliness, hideousness, and condemning factors of sin in a largely God-rejecting world. Just think about it!
Consider that Hebrews 11:1 calls the spiritual avenue “. . . the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” The blessedness, power, and essence of faith follows throughout that tremendous chapter underscoring the responsible agent of triumph over the overwhelming agents of sin and death. It is arguably the greatest chapter of Christian sustainment in the Bible.
Faith, hope, love are a triad of very real intangibles which defy the test tubes and microscopes of science, as well as the understanding of those who are the recipients of them. They are the provisions of grace: the Creator to the created that rectifies, even excels the Edenic cosmos that our federal parents cast down in that place so long ago.
It all has to do with the decision making processes. Adam and Eve decided to transgress the commands of the Creator thus adding sin inexorably to the makeup of the species.
Paul argues in I Corinthians chapter fifteen, that as the decision of Adam brought condemnation, the decision and perfect work of Jesus brings light and life; albeit not to the sum of the species, but by every individual who is exercised thereby. The greatest wonder of it all is its possibility. It took the death and subsequent resurrection of Jesus to do it. But death is the direct result of sin, and Jesus had no sin—no not one. How then could the sinless become sin for us and pay the penalty for sin that we could not? Again, it is the decision making process, and specifically of One Who is qualified to make the decision with the wherewithal to pay the uttermost.
Thus are we blessed with the substantiatment of eternal things. That substantiation creates the intangible reality of hope in the human heart. Hope is the earnest, intense expectation of knowing and experiencing the physical realities so intangibly planted. It is by faith that we understand creation, Heb. 11:3. So, the essence of faith: without it, it is impossible to please God for he who comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of all those who diligently seek Him. Heb. 11:6. Truly, a faithless life is a life that would be better served had it never existed.

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Daniel Webster born JANUARY 18, 1782


The Moral Liberal

Defending the Judeo-Christian Heritage, limited government, and the American Constitution

Daniel Webster born JANUARY 18, 1782

Daniel Webster 2American Minute with Bill Federer

One of the five greatest Senators in U.S. history, the State of New Hampshire placed his statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

His career spanned almost four decades, serving as Secretary of State for Presidents William Harrison, John Tyler and Millard Fillmore.

His name was Daniel Webster, born JANUARY 18, 1782.

From a New Hampshire farm, he attended Dartmouth College and became the highest paid attorney of his day.

He fought the slave trade and negotiated the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, which set the nation’s Northeast boundary.

When South Carolina threatened nullification, Daniel Webster stated:

“Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!”

When asked what the most profound thought was that ever passed through his mind, Daniel Webster responded:

“My accountability to God.”

At the age of 20, Daniel Webster served as the headmaster of Fryeburg Academy in Fryeburg, Maine, where he delivered a Fourth of July Oration in 1802:

“If an angel should be winged from Heaven, on an errand of mercy to our country, the first accents that would glow on his lips would be,

‘Beware! Be cautious! You have everything to lose; nothing to gain…’”

Daniel Webster continued:

“We live under the only government that ever existed which was framed by the unrestrained and deliberate consultations of the people.

Miracles do not cluster. That which has happened but once in six thousand years cannot be expected to happen often.

Such a government, once gone, might leave a void, to be filled, for ages, with revolution and tumult, riot and despotism.”

At the age of 70, just eight months before his death, Daniel Webster addressed the New York Historical Society, February 23, 1852:

“If we, and our posterity, shall be true to the Christian religion, if we and they shall live always in the fear of God, and shall respect his commandments, if we, and they, shall maintain just, moral sentiments, and such conscientious convictions of duty as shall control the heart and life, we may have the highest hopes of the future fortunes of our country…

It will have no Decline and Fall. It will go on prospering and to prosper.

But, if we and our posterity reject religious instruction and authority, violate the rules of eternal justice, trifle with the injunctions of morality, and recklessly destroy the political constitution, which holds us together, no man can tell, how sudden a catastrophe may overwhelm us, that shall bury all our glory in profound obscurity.

Should that catastrophe happen, let it have no history! Let the horrible narrative never be written!…”

Daniel Webster continued:

“We may trust, that Heaven will not forsake us, nor permit us to forsake ourselves.

We must strengthen ourselves, and gird up our loins with new resolution; we must counsel each other; and, determined to sustain each other in the support of the Constitution, prepare to meet manfully… whatever of difficulty, or of danger…or of sacrifice, the Providence of God may call upon us to meet.

Are we of this generation so derelict, have we so little of the blood of our revolutionary fathers coursing through our veins, that we cannot preserve, what they achieved?

The world will cry out ‘shame’ upon us, if we show ourselves unworthy, to be the descendants of those great and illustrious men, who fought for their liberty, and secured it to their posterity, by the Constitution of the United States…

We have a great and wise Constitution. We have grown, flourished, and prospered under it, with a degree of rapidity, unequaled in the history of the world.

Founded on the basis of equal civil rights, its provisions secure perfect equality and freedom; those who live under it are equal, and enjoy the same privileges…”

Daniel Webster added:

“The Constitution has enemies, secret and professed… They have hot heads and cold hearts. They are rash, reckless, and fierce for change, and with no affection for the existing institutions of their country…

Other enemies there are, more cool, and with more calculation. These have a deeper and more fixed and dangerous purpose…

There are those in the country, who profess, in their own words, even to hate the Constitution…

Friends of the Constitution must rally and unite…act, with immovable firmness, like a band of brothers, with moderation and conciliation… looking only to the great object set before them, the preservation of the Constitution, bequeathed to them by their ancestors.

They must gird up their loins for the work. It is a duty which they owe to these ancestors, and to the generations which are to succeed them…”

Daniel Webster concluded:

“Gentlemen, I give my confidence, my countenance, my heart and hand, my entire co-operation to all good men…who are willing to stand by the Constitution…

I hardly know…the manner of our political death… We shall die no lingering death…

An earthquake would shake the foundations of the globe, pull down the pillars of heaven, and bury us at once in endless darkness.

Such may be the fate of this country and its institutions. May I never live, to see that day!

May I not survive to hear any apocalyptic angel, crying through the heavens, with such a voice as announced the fall of Babylon,

‘Ἔπεσεν, ἔπεσεν, Αμερικη ἡ μεγάλη, καὶ ἐγένετο κατοικητήριον δαιμονίων, καὶ φυλακὴ παντὸς πνεύματος ἀκαθάρτου.’ (Greek: ‘Is fallen, is fallen, America the Great has become a habitation of demons and a hold for every unclean spirit.’)


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal Contributing Editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Freedom of Religion and the Indiana Law


Freedom of Religion and the Indiana Law: On the verge of Government Run Faith

by Bro. Jeff Haney

“Then Peter and the other apostles answered and said, We ought to obey God rather than men.”  Acts 5:29

Biblically speaking, there are two times, and only two times when it is necessary for the children of God to disregard, disobey, and defy the laws of the land and simply refuse to obey their government:  1.) When the government by law forbids someone from obeying God – Daniel’s praying against the law that forbade it; 2.) When the government by forces someone to disobey God – Hananiah, Azariah, and Meshael, (Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego) being forced to bow to a false god.  Only when circumstance fit within the framework of those scriptural principles can a child of God rightly and flatly refuse to obey the laws of the government ruling over them.

I have never seen a time in our nation when either one of those scenarios were the case.  To my limited knowledge there has never been a time, when I, anyone I know, or anyone I have heard of, was forced into disobeying the God of the Bible.  Conversely, to my limited knowledge there has never been a time when I, anyone I know, or anyone I have heard of was forbidden from obeying God.  Within the scope of my vision frontwards, backwards and all around I have never seen either of those cases play out in our society . . . until now.

Though not here yet, we are standing on the cliff of Government Run Faith.  Of course we have seen government run health-care on the front porch of the evening news for a while now.  Government regulations grip every industry from education and finance to bean sprouts, pot holes, and outhouses.  If what is happening over the law being passed in Indiana is any indication of the direction and mood of those wanting the government to regulate body fat, and hairstyles, the next big thing is government approved belief.

The central issue in those shouting the accusations of discrimination is the fact that they cannot and will not stand for someone believing a particular behavior is wrong.  As one commentator said, “No one would dare expect a black baker to prepare cupcakes for a KKK rally.”  Why then on earth would someone expect a Bible believing Christian to endorse a gay marriage?

Regardless of how loud it gets said, how long they say it, or how many people chime in, in agreement, the scenario they present of a Christian florist refusing flowers for a gay couple is not now, nor has it ever been, nor will it ever be discrimination.  It is discernment, conviction, and belief based on the Word of God not to aid and abet a sin that has always been, and always will be a sin.  It is not bigotry, it is not hatred, it is not intolerance.  We do not provide alcohol to alcoholics, we do not carry people with gambling problems to casinos, we do not drive get away cars for bank-robbers.

Acting upon homosexual attraction is not acceptable to the God of creation. It is not okay, it is not to be embraced, applauded, aided or abetted.  From what God has said to man, it is morally illegal, it is spiritually illegal, it is eternally illegal, it is outright bona fide, sin.  Period.  That is the end of the subject for Christians, and it will never, ever, ever, change.  As I have said before, if God said something different, then every Bible believing Christian in the world would say something different.  We do not take our cues from “how we are born” we take our cues from “What God has said.”

If those who’s tolerance is a one-way street would speak in plain honest language, what they would says is, “You are not allowed to believe what you believe, and you are not allowed to behave according to that belief.  You cannot believe the Bible, you cannot obey the Bible, and you cannot proclaim what you say the Bible says.”  Of course that’s my words in their mouths, but that is what I’m hearing from those who have more heat than light.

According to the direction of the mood of this country, the heart of their heat, and their hate is aimed at regulating what Americans are allowed to believe. It is not socially acceptable to “believe gay marriage is wrong.”  If that course of thinking continues to be fertilized and fed, it will not be long before it is not legally acceptable to continue to “behave” with the conviction that gay marriage is wrong.  Changes are definitely coming, and they are the kind that are not worth making

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James Wilson, founding father, died August 21, 1798


jameswilsonAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

He was one of six founding fathers to sign both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

President Washington appointed him to the Supreme Court.

Born in Scotland, he was a delegate to the Constitutional Convention, speaking 168 times.

His name was James Wilson and he died AUGUST 21, 1798.

The first law professor of the University of Pennsylvania, James Wilson wrote in his Lectures on Law, 1789-91, that all law comes from God, being divided into four categories:

“law eternal,” “law celestial,” “laws of nature,”

and:

“Law…communicated to us by reason and conscience…has been called natural; as promulgated by the Holy Scriptures, it has been called revealed…

But it should always be remembered, that this law, natural or revealed…flows from the same divine source; it is the law of God.”

“Human law must rest its authority, ultimately, upon the authority of that law, which is divine.”

James Wilson continued:

“Far from being rivals or enemies, religion and law are twin sisters, friends, and mutual assistants. Indeed, these two sciences run into each other.”

James Wilson stated:

“The first and governing maxim in the interpretation of a statute is to discover the meaning of those who made it.”

James Wilson remarked at Pennsylvania’s ratifying convention, November 26, 1787:

“Governments, in general, have been the result of force, of fraud, and accident.

After a period of 6,000 years has elapsed since the creation, the United States exhibit to the world the first instance, as far as we can learn, of a nation…assembling voluntarily…and deciding calmly concerning that system of government under which they would wish that they and their posterity should live.”

In expounding on the “Will of God,” James Wilson described it as the:

“…efficient cause of moral obligation – of the eminent distinction between right and wrong…(and therefore the) supreme law…

(It is revealed) by our conscience, by our reason, and by the Holy Scriptures.”

The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania records in Updegraph v. Commonwealth, 1824:

“The late Judge James Wilson, of the Supreme Court of the United States, Professor of Law in the College in Philadelphia…

for our present form of government we are greatly indebted to his exertions…

In his Course of Lectures (3d Vol. of his Works, 122), he states that…

‘Christianity is part of the common-law.’”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Francis Asbury, born August 20, 1745


Agree or disagree with this denomination, great benefit in freedom of religion was attained with this Methodist and the Baptist.

Francis AsburyAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

300,000 miles on horseback, from the Atlantic to the Appalachians, from Maine to the Gulf of Mexico, for 45 years, he spread the Gospel.

This was Francis Asbury, Methodist Circuit riding preacher who was born AUGUST 20, 1745.

When the Revolution began, he was the only Methodist minister to remain in America, refusing to return with other Anglican ministers to England, stating:

“I can by no means agree to leave such a field for gathering souls to Christ as we have in America.”

Preaching over 16,000 sermons, Asbury’s leadership resulted in the Methodist Church in America growing from 1,200 people to 214,000 with 700 ordained minsters.

In 1785, Asbury broke the Methodist movement away from the Episcopal Church, forming its own denomination.

This had tremendous political impact, as Episcopal members of Virginia’s Assembly now no longer had a majority.

When a vote was taken the next year, the Episcopal Church lost its position as Virginia’s established State Church, thereby allowing other denominations to be treated equally.

Francis Asbury befriended Richard Bassett, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, who converted to being a Methodist, freed his slaves, paid them as hired labor and rode joyfully with them to revival meetings.

Methodist Bishops Francis Asbury and Thomas Coke met with newly elected President George Washington in New York, delivering the message, May 19, 1789:

“We…express to you…our sincere congratulations, on your appointment to the presidentship of these States.

We…place as full a confidence in your wisdom and integrity, for the preservation of those civil and religious liberties which have been transmitted to us by the Providence of GOD…

Dependence on the Great Governor of the Universe which you have repeatedly expressed, acknowledging Him the source of every blessing, and particularly of the most excellent Constitution of these States, which is at present the admiration of the world…”

Bishop Asbury continued:

“We enjoy a holy expectation that you will always prove a faithful and impartial patron of genuine, vital religion – the grand end of our creation and present probationary existence…

We promise you our fervent prayers to the Throne of Grace, that GOD Almighty may endue you with all the graces and gifts of his Holy Spirit, that may enable you to fill up your important station to His glory.”

On May 29, 1789, President Washington wrote a reply:

“To the Bishops of the Methodist-Episcopal Church…

I return to you…my thanks for the demonstrations of affection and the expressions of joy…on my late appointment.

It shall still be my endeavor…to contribute…towards the preservation of the civil and religious liberties of the American people…

I hope, by the assistance of Divine Providence, not altogether to disappoint the confidence which you have been pleased to repose in me…in acknowledgments of homage to the Great Governor of the Universe…”

Washington continued:

“I trust the people of every denomination…will have every occasion to be convinced that I shall always strive to prove a faithful and impartial patron of genuine, vital religion…

I take in the kindest part the promise you make of presenting your prayers at the Throne of Grace for me, and that I likewise implore the Divine benediction on yourselves and your religious community.”

In 1799, Francis Asbury ordained the first African-American Methodist minister, Richard Allen, and dedicated the first African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Unveiling the Equestrian Statue of Francis Asbury in Washington, D.C., 1924, President Calvin Coolidge stated:

“Francis Asbury, the first American Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church…made a tremendous contribution…”

Coolidge continued:

“Our government rests upon religion. It is from that source that we derive our reverence for truth and justice, for equality and liberty, and for the rights of mankind. Unless the people believe in these principles they cannot believe in our government…

Calling the people to righteousness (was) a direct preparation for self-government. It was for a continuation of this work that Francis Asbury was raised up.”

Coolidge added:

“The government of a country never gets ahead of the religion of a country. There is no way by which we can substitute the authority of law for the virtue of man…

Real reforms which society in these days is seeking will come as a result of our religious convictions, or they will not come at all. Peace, justice, humanity, charity – these cannot be legislated into being. They are the result of a Divine Grace…”

Coolidge continued about Francis Asbury:

“Frontier mothers must have brought their children to him to receive his blessings! It is more than probable that Nancy Hanks, the mother of Lincoln, had heard him in her youth.

Adams and Jefferson must have known him, and Jackson must have seen in him a flaming spirit as unconquerable as his own…He is entitled to rank as one of the builders of our nation.

On the foundation of a religious civilization which he sought to build, our country has enjoyed greater blessing of liberty and prosperity than was ever before the lot of man.

These cannot continue if we neglect the work which he did.”

Coolidge concluded:

“We cannot depend on the government to do the work of religion. I do not see how anyone could recount the story of this early Bishop without feeling a renewed faith in our own country.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Contend for the Faith  


 

Jude 3, 4

“Beloved, when I gave all diligence to write unto you of the common salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and exhort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints,” Jude 3.

Jude begins this letter with the statement that he desired to write a letter concerning salvation, but something compelled him to send a warning first. Jude had to first warn the believers about the danger of false teachers among them. The salvation of the believers was not at risk, but the salvation of others was. There was also danger of the church being led astray. So, Jude instructed the believers to contend for the faith.

To contend simply means, “to compete and fight for something.” Jude was urging the people to put up a challenge to those who would seek to lead them away from God’s truths. He said that God has given this “faith” or truth once for all time. We have been given God’s Word. God has revealed to us His will and His truths. Now that we have the Scripture completed, there is no need of any additions or new revelations.

Even in our current day false teachers are trying to bring a new twist to biblical truths. There are those that seek to change the eternal truths to fit into today’s secular culture. Do not be fooled! Contend for the faith! Just as counterfeit “men of god” were creeping in and presenting false teaching in Jude’s day, they are still active in our day. Be ready to contend!

 

 

JUST A THOUGHT

What are some ways you are contending for the faith on a daily basis?

Nathan Rogers

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Napoleon, born August 15, 1769


Napoleon_in_His_StudyAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

After the French Revolution, a slave revolt resulted in France’s loss of Haiti (Saint-Domingue), one of the world’s main producers of sugar.

Desiring to replace it with another tropical colony in order to compete with Britain’s India, the French General Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Egypt in 1798.

Napoleon defeated the Egyptian Mamluk slave cavalry in just a few weeks.

Napoleon then attempted to introduce democracy, equality and liberty but found there were no words in the Arabic language to convey such concepts, as they had been ruled for centuries by the sword.

Napoleon uncovered the Pyramid treasures, the Rosetta Stone and conquered into Palestine.

After losing the Battle of the Nile to Britain, he eventually had to return to France.

Napoleon, born AUGUST 15, 1769, then conquered across Europe – from Italy, Austria, Poland, and German States, to Holland, Denmark and Norway.

His military ‘envelopment’ tactic and use of mobile artillery resulted in him being considered one of the greatest military commanders of all time.

He spread the metric system and a civil-legal system – the Napoleonic Code – which emancipated Catholics in Protestant countries and Protestants in Catholic countries, as well as Jews across Europe.

Fearing Haiti’s slave rebellion would spread to the French Louisiana Territory, and badly needing money for his Army, Napoleon sold a million square miles of land to the United States in 1803 – the “Louisiana Purchase.”

Napoleon’s draining war in Spain inadvertently resulted in the Mexican War of Independence.

The loss of French troops retreating from Russia and his defeat at Leipzig led to Napoleon’s abdication and exile on the Island of Elba in 1813.

After a year, he escaped and again took control of France for 100 dates, but lost the Battle of Waterloo to Britain, June 18, 1815.

During the 17 years of Napoleonic Wars, an estimated 6 million Europeans died.

In October 1815, Napoleon was banished to the South Atlantic Island of Saint Helena, where he died in 1821 at the age of 52.

Reflecting on his life, Napoleon dictated his “Mémoires” to General de Montholon, Baron Gourgaud and General Bertrand.

His conversations were recorded by Emmanuel de Las Cases in Memorial de Sainte Hélène (published 1823).

Napoleon had complained to Montholon of not having a chaplain, resulting in Pope Pius VII petitioning England to allow Abbé Vignali to be sent.

Napoleon read out loud the Old Testament, the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles.

Affirming his belief in God, Napoleon told Montholon:

“I know men; and I tell you that Jesus Christ is not a man.

Superficial minds see a resemblance between Christ and the founders of empires, and the gods of other religions. That resemblance does not exist.

There is between Christianity and whatever other religions the distance of infinity…

His religion is a revelation from an intelligence which certainly is not that of man.

The religion of Christ is a mystery which subsists by its own force, and proceeds from a mind which is not a human mind.

We find in it a marked individuality, which originated a train of words and actions unknown before…”

Order American Minute-Notable Events of American Significance Remembered on the Date they Occurred

Napoleon continued:

“Jesus is not a philosopher, for His proofs are miracles, and from the first His disciples adored Him.

Alexander, Caesar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon what foundation did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force!

But Jesus Christ founded His upon love; and at this hour millions of men would die for Him.”

Napoleon had stated:

“The Bible is no mere book, but a Living Creature, with a power that conquers all that oppose it.”

Napoleon once told a Milan parish priest in 1797:

“Society without religion is like a ship without a compass.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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H.G. Wells Science Fiction entertained and inspired


H G Wells 1st Men on the Moon book coverAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

“New Jersey is being invaded by Martians!” exclaimed actor Orson Welles.

He was reading the script of a 1938 radio drama based on the novel War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells, who died AUGUST 13, 1946.

Herbert George Wells was from an impoverished lower middle class family.

He failed as a draper and chemist assistant before going into literature.

H.G. Wells wrote many best-selling science fiction novels:

The Time Machine, 1895;

The Island of Doctor Moreau, 1896;

The Invisible Man, 1897;

The War of the Worlds, 1898;

and

The First Men in the Moon, 1901, which inspired a boy named Robert Goddard to become the father of modern rocketry.

President Ronald Reagan referred to H.G. Wells in an address at the National Space Club, March 29, 1985:

“Dr. Goddard once wrote a letter to H.G. Wells…

‘There can be no thoughts of finishing, for aiming at the stars…is a problem to occupy generations…there is always the thrill of just beginning.’”

Reagan added:

“Personally, I like space. The higher you go, the smaller the Federal Government looks.”

In Outlines of History, (NY: MacMillian Co., 1920), H.G. Wells commented of the U.S. Constitution:

“Its spirit is indubitably Christian.”

H.G. Wells wrote in The Pocket History of the World (August, 1941):

“Ideas of human solidarity, thanks to Christianity, were far more widely diffused in the newer European world, political power was not so concentrated,

and the man of energy anxious to get rich turned his mind, therefore, very willingly from the ideas of the slave and of gang labour to the idea of mechanical power and the machine.”

Though admittedly not a follower of traditional religion, H.G. Wells wrote regarding education:

“Education is the preparation of the individual for the community, and his religious training is the core of that preparation.”

H.G. Wells wrote in Outlines of History (NY: MacMillian Co., 1920, Vol. 2, p. 13):

“Because Mohammed too founded a great religion, there are those who write of this evidently lustful and rather shifty leader as though he were a man to put beside Jesus of Nazareth or Gautama or Mani.

But it is surely manifest that he was a being of commoner clay; he was vain, egotistical, tyrannous, and a self-deceiver; and it would throw all our history out of proportion if, out of an insincere deference to the possible Moslem reader, we were to present him in any other light.”

Though initially against a Jewish homeland, after the Nazi holocaust atrocities H.G. Wells changed to supporting the Jews, even initiating correspondence with chemist Chaim Weizmann, the future first President of the State of Israel. (David Lodge, The Man of Parts, Harvill Secker, 2011, p. 403):

“My own…tactlessness, aroused the resentment of Jews who are essentially at one with me in their desire for a sane equalitarian world order. For centuries the Jewish community, whatever its Old Testament tradition, has been the least aggressive of all nationally conscious communities. Mea Culpa.”

In The Secret Places of the Heart, 1922, H.G. Wells reflected:

“Sir Richmond and Miss Grammont went out into the moonlit gloaming…crossed the bridge…and followed the road beside the river towards the old Abbey Church, that Lantern of the West…

Said Sir Richmond…’It’s only through love that God can reach over from one human being to another. All real love is a divine thing.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Ulysses S. Grant – Soldier, President, man of faith


ulysses-grant-pictureAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

Ulysses S. Grant was commissioned JULY 25, 1866, as General of the Army, the first ever to hold that rank and wear the four silver star insignia.

Popularity from Civil War victories resulted in him being chosen as Republican candidate for President in 1868.

Earlier, while farming in Missouri, Grant inherited a slave from his wife’s father, a 35-year-old man named William Jones. Though they were in a dire financial situation, Grant freed his slave in 1859 rather than sell him for badly needed money.

Grant signed the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, limiting Democrat vigilante and lynching activity of freed slaves in the South.

Elected the 18th President, Grant supported ratification of the 15th Amendment guaranteeing freed slaves the right to vote.

Grant stated in his Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1873:

“Under Providence I have been called a second time to act as Executive over this great nation…

The effects of the late civil strife have been to free the slave and make him a citizen. Yet he is not possessed of the civil rights which citizenship should carry with it. This is wrong, and should be corrected. To this correction I stand committed.”

Grant worked to stabilize the country’s currency by having it backed by gold, as during the Civil War the Federal Government printed an excess of paper money with no backing except ‘faith’ in the Federal Government.

In his First Inaugural Address, March 4, 1869, President Ulysses S. Grant stated:

“Every dollar of Government indebtedness should be paid in gold…

It looks as though Providence had bestowed upon us a strong box in the precious metals locked up in the sterile mountains of the far West, and which we are now forging the key to unlock, to meet the very contingency that is now upon us.”

Of his Indian policy, Grant stated in his First Annual Message, December 6, 1869:

“The Society of Friends…succeeded in living in peace with the Indians in the early settlement of Pennsylvania…

These considerations induced me to give the management of a few reservations of Indians to them.”

President Grant stated in his 2nd Annual Message, December 5, 1870:

“Religious denominations as had established missionaries among the Indians…are expected to watch over them and aid them…to Christianize and civilize the Indians, and to train him in the arts of peace.”

President Grant wrote to Congress, January 1, 1871:

“Indians of the country should be encouraged…to adopt our form of government, and it is highly desirable that they become self-sustaining, self-relying, Christianized, and civilized.”

President Grant stated in his 3rd Annual Message, December 4, 1871:

“I recommend liberal appropriations to carry out the Indian peace policy, not only because it is humane and Christianlike…but because it is right.”

Grant, being the youngest President to that date, 46 years old, had a military training of trusting subordinates, leaving him ill-prepared for dealing with political intrigues, hidden motives and greed of Washington politicians.

As a result, a number of those in his Administration were involved in granting government favors and monopolies in exchange for bribes and insider deals.

Called the “Gilded Age” by Mark Twain, a friend of Grant’s, America saw:

-Immigrants arriving in record numbers;

-Railroads crossing the nation;

-Industry and manufacturing expanded;

-Iron, steel production rising dramatically;

-Western resources of lumber, gold and silver; and the

-Oil industry replacing the use of whale blubber oil, saving the whale.

Industrialists, called “Robber Barons,” amassed great wealth by providing more goods to people at cheaper prices, raising the country’s standard of living:

John Jacob Astor (real estate, fur);
Andrew Carnegie (steel);
James Fisk (finance);
Henry Flagler (railroads, oil);
Jay Gould (railroads);
Edward Harriman (railroads);
Andrew Mellon (finance, oil);
J.P. Morgan (finance, industrial);
John D. Rockefeller (oil);
Charles M. Schwab (steel); and
Cornelius Vanderbilt (water transport, railroads).

Ulysses S. Grant did not personally profit from being in office and even went bankrupt as a result of naively trusting investors.

Struggling financially, and suffering from throat cancer in his later years from cigar smoking, Grant was encouraged by Mark Twain to write his Memoirs of the Civil War in order to provide an income for his wife after his death.

Encouraged by the outpouring of support from people across the country, Ulysses S. Grant, who was a Methodist, wrote in 1884:

“I believe in the Holy Scriptures, and whoso lives by them will be benefited thereby. Men may differ as to the interpretation, which is human, but the Scriptures are man’s best guide…

I did not go riding yesterday, although invited and permitted by my physicians, because it was the Lord’s day, and because I felt that if a relapse should set in, the people who are praying for me would feel that I was not helping their faith by riding out on Sunday….

Yes, I know, and I feel very grateful to the Christian people of the land for their prayers in my behalf. There is no sect or religion, as shown in the Old or New Testament, to which this does not apply.”

Just days after delivering his final manuscript to the printer, Ulysses S. Grant died, July 23, 1885.

Nine years earlier, President Grant wrote to the Editor of the Sunday School Times in Philadelphia, June 6, 1876:

“Your favor of yesterday asking a message from me to the children and the youth of the United States, to accompany your Centennial number, is this morning received.

My advice to Sunday schools, no matter what their denomination, is: Hold fast to the Bible as the sheet anchor of your liberties; write its precepts in your hearts, and practice them in your lives.

To the influence of this Book are we indebted for all the progress made in true civilization, and to this must we look as our guide in the future.

‘Righteousness exalteth a nation; but sin is a reproach to any people.’ Yours respectfully, U.S. Grant.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Run With Patience  


 

Hebrews 12:1, 2

Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus,” Hebrews 12:1, 2.

 

The context of Hebrews 12 is chapter 11. Here God listed many saints and how their faith produced works that give witness to us that God rewards faithfulness. There is also a lesson that our faithfulness inspires all those who are presently holding to our shirttails.

Abraham was faithful and patient, enduring hardships for Christ’s sake. Therefore, Isaac endured, looking for God’s city. Isaac was faithful; therefore, Jacob was faithful when he finally matured.

All these men were wealthy and could have built their own city. But, God had promised Abraham a city. Therefore, because Abraham believed God’s promise, Isaac and Jacob endured patiently, living in temporary tents.

Jacob both feet in the grave, never having seen the promise come to pass. But, he knew eventually it would become a reality because their father and their grandfather both lived their whole lives looking for that city.

Jesus has promised to come and take His children to the same city Abraham, Isaac and Jacob looked for.

 

 

JUST SAYING

Endure patiently for the sake of all those to whom your life is a witness.

Robert Brock

 

 

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