Tag Archives: death

MARCH 21 – Which Way


MARCH 21 – Which Way

Proverbs 14:12  There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death. 

We are all traveling a journey of a lifetime. Where we end up depends on the choices we make. The journey between the beginning and the ending is determined by what guides us. There are only two paths to living and two endings that will take place. There is the path of the world which many take because it fits the desire of the natural carnal nature. We also have available the path that God has laid down for us, a spiritual relationship with the Son and a spirit led path. It is important to choose a path wisely.

It is the way in which man is born. Job knowing God made this statement, “Job_5:7  Yet man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward.” This is a description of the natural man without God. Isaiah had some astute words to impart about the life of man in his natural or carnal condition. “Isa_50:11  Behold, all ye that kindle a fire, that compass yourselves about with sparks: walk in the light of your fire, and in the sparks that ye have kindled. This shall ye have of mine hand; ye shall lie down in sorrow.” What we have at birth is a sin nature that needs to be cleansed.

They see many walking in this way. Man’s propensity is to follow the crowd and be accepted as one of the crowd. Even in rebellion against the crowd, the rebel joins another crowd, not for the better and sometimes for the worse. They will put their interests in what the others find interesting. They will join the fads that others begin. If they find a need for spirituality, they will join with whoever meets their desires that allow them to be what they want to be.

It is an easy way to walk in. They will be encouraged and congratulated when they look like everyone else. They will find that the world’s philosophy will reward them even when they are in the midst of struggles and disappointment. When families are falling apart, people are struggling with addictions, they are told it is not their fault. They swing around the truth that every person is responsible for their own actions.

It is a way which is profitable to self. There are times when some find this wicked type of life to be profitable. This profitability could be financial or a position of power. It can be profitable until death rings life’s doorbell. This time of facing death is a very disconcerting time for the carnal natural man. There is fear and uncertainty involved in dying with no hope.

How shall we know this way of death? It is the way of sin. It is the course of this world. It is the way of indifference to the things of eternity. It is the easy path of the world in ignoring God and His Son Jesus Christ. The offer for forgiveness stands and is ignored. It is a free gift and is spurned. Those that have received Jesus as Savior have a brighter future at death than the natural carnal man.

What is your relationship with the Lord? Are you still a natural man or have you been cleansed by the blood?

Leave a comment

Filed under Devotional, Uncategorized

MARCH 8 – I will wait till my change comes


MARCH 8 – I will wait till my change comes

Job 14:14  If a man die, shall he live again? all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come. 

What blessed event Job is talking about. He had great joy with family and friends till tragedy struck. Now we find a life full of sorrow and sadness. Friends came but at this point, they were very condemning and not much comfort. He had lost riches and a comfortable life. He had lost his children and even his wife said to curse God and die. Now his friends are telling him how great a sinner he is. This is a miserable life.

I remember when I brought my father home to spend his last days with me and my wife. He was on dialysis three days a week. This would wear him out. There were times after dialysis I would tell dad, I need to stop at this house and spend a few minutes talking to these people. His mild dementia might prevent him from remembering my name, yet he realized this was God’s work. His reply was always, you go ahead, I will wait right here for you. There were two prayers he prayed. “Lord take me home.” He knew this old world was not his home.” The second prayer was, “Lord if you are going to leave me here, give me my health so I can serve you.” He never prayed restore my health so I can enjoy the pleasures of this world. The time he was on this earth, he called it “tenting and tabernacling.” In other words, he considered his time here as being temporary.

Job knew that time on this earth is only for an appointed time. God had set a time for man. Job knew where he was going at death. He knew there would be a change. Some of you were something on your wrist that counts your steps. Job said that God numbers his steps. That is a recognition that God knew him intimately and knew every sin. We must realize that God has an intimate knowledge of us. He knows our thinking and our motives. He knows that one day we will stand before Him. We will be judged. May we stand before him having served Him faithfully and served Him his way.

Serving God in spirit and in truth is our work on earth.

Leave a comment

Filed under Devotional, Uncategorized

THE RESOLVES OF JANUARY


THE RESOLVES OF JANUARY

William Andrew Dillard
Parson to Person

Here it is! It is not known just what it may bring, but 12 months of time is laid out before terrestrial creatures. They will be filled with something, and there lies within a large majority of folks a deep desire to fill it with things that are choice, more important, noble, lofty goals for the betterment of self and of others. The question is: “do you own this allotment of time, or does it own you? Nothing short of death will stop its progress for each of us. So, how wise it is to own it instead of it owning us.
Resolutions frivolously made are easily discarded and much of the time they are made with a sense of humor, devoid of any intentions to see them become reality. A favorite newspaper cartoon strip is titled “The Born Loser.” I usually read it first for the humor it provides. One January cartoon depicts the born loser’s wealthy boss stating a resolve to give up his pink caviar imported from the Caspian Sea. He then asks the born loser what he resolves to give up for the year. He replies in jest that he is giving up the very same thing!”
The problem with New Year resolutions is that they are made by so many who lack the resolve to carry them out, even if they are fairly simple, doable ones.
In contrast, there are resolutions of spiritual resolve that are carried out with great precision because they do not depend on human abilities or the novelty of a New Year. Rather, they are brought to fruition through the power of Almighty God to Whom is looked for heavenly power and strength. These in stark contrast to human will, are made through the convicting power of the Holy Spirit, and empowered by the same.
Therefore, just what is the deep desire of your heart that you really want to see happen in yourself and/or in the life of others in 2018? Find a secret place and talk it over with the Heavenly Father Who can do exceeding abundantly above all that we think or ask. Surely, this is what the songwriter had in mind as the words of the beloved hymn were written:
“I am resolved, no longer to linger, charmed by the world’s delights. Things that are higher, things that are nobler, these have allured my sight. I will hasten, hasten to Him, hasten so glad and free, Jesus, Jesus, greatest highest, I will come to thee!”
Coming before the Lord in a repentant attitude will yield a level of awareness, understanding, and peace of life that no fleshly resolution could ever bring. It brings one to the fountain of life and power whereby spiritual maturity, and increased hope may flourish: even to God’s garden of tenderly cultivated, nourished, and fruit-bearing saints in His church, the pillar and ground of the truth!
It is the pastor’s desire to be a better pastor, teacher of God’s things. His desire also includes the joy and peace of all whom he knows by the maturity and happiness gushing forth from the Holy Word of God. So may it be!

Leave a comment

Filed under Commentary, Uncategorized

HEBREW HONEYCOMB


HEBREW HONEYCOMB

William Andrew Dillard
“DYING, THOU SHALT SURELY DIE”
The phrase, “Dying. thou shalt surely die” is a literal translation of the Hebrew words revealing the penalty for eating of the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil. The serpent capitalized on the words, assuring Mother Eve that she would not immediately fall down dead from eating of the forbidden fruit. Additionally, there was good food to be had and knowledge to be gained. Of course, he purposely did not reveal that unlike God, she would not be able to always choose the good and shun the evil. What subtlety in his lies!
So, with sin now incorporated into the basic makeup of the species, it is appointed unto men once to die. Hebrews 9:27. Is there anyone who could successfully argue against this consistent process? Every hospital testifies that men get sick and die. Every cemetery shouts that it is appointed unto men once to die. Every undertaking establishment says that it is appointed unto men once to die. Old age, and the loss of mental acumen bears witness that it is appointed unto men once to die, so death reigns on planet Earth without respect of persons. The Bible is plain in declaring that the last enemy of mankind to be destroyed will be death. 1 Cor. 15:26.
But GOOD NEWS! For those who trust in the Lord Jesus Christ as their personal Savior, death has indeed been destroyed as the enemy. Jesus soundly defeated it on the cross long, long ago. He not only defeated it, He made it to lay down at our feet and patiently wait for the nod of God to become our transport from the terrestrial to the celestial.
Consequently, there is no fear of the grim reaper in the eternally young heart of the redeemed. Neither is it waited upon with dread. Conversely, the Father of Spirits is fellowshipped in increasing intensity in the full realization that should the Lord Jesus not appear bodily in His glorious second coming, the hideous monster of death will become a limousine to carry us over into the higher dimension in style to the shout of throngs of awaiting saints constituting the grandest welcoming committee imaginable, and in their midst is the blessed Son of God by whose Word, Work, and Authority we enter that heavenly home.
But until then, sin continues to raise its ugly head and we do what we would not. Thus does the reality of its penalty exercise itself in all of us: “Dying, thou shalt surely die.”

Leave a comment

Filed under Commentary, Uncategorized

‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’


American Minute with Bill Federer

There were ten major persecutions of Christians in the first three centuries, and Emperor Diocletian’s was the worst.

When Diocletian had lost battles in Persia, his generals told him it was because they had neglected the Roman gods.

Diocletian ordered all military personnel to worship the Roman gods, thus forcing Christians either into the closet or out of the army.

After purging Christians from the military, Diocletian surrounded himself with public opponents of Christianity.

He revoked the tolerance issued a previous Emperor Gallienus in 260 AD, and then used the military to force all of Rome to worship pagan gods.

In 303 AD, Diocletian consulted the Oracle Temple of Apollo at Didyma, which told him to initiate a great empire-wide persecution of the Christian church.

What followed was an intolerant, hateful and severe persecution of Christians.

Diocletian had his military go systematically province by province arresting church leaders, burning scriptures, destroying churches, cutting out tongues, boiling Christians alive and decapitating them.

From Europe to North Africa, thousands were martyred.

The faithful cried out in fervent prayer.

Then Diocletian was struck with a painful intestinal disease and resigned on MAY 1, 305 AD.

Emperor Gelarius continued the persecution, but he too was struck with the intestinal disease and died.

Commenting on Roman persecutions was Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan, who was the Democrat Party’s candidate for President in 1896, 1900, and 1908.

He stated in his speech, “The Prince of Peace,” (New York Times, September 7, 1913):

I can imagine that the early Christians who were carried into the Coliseum to make a spectacle for those more savage than the beasts, were entreated by their doubting companions not to endanger their lives.

But, kneeling in the center of the arena, they prayed and sang until they were devoured…”

William Jennings Bryan continued:

How helpless they seemed, and, measured by every human rule, how hopeless was their cause!

And yet within a few decades the power which they invoked proved mightier than the legions of the Emperor, and the faith in which they died was triumphant o’er all the land….

They were greater conquerors in their death than they could have been had they purchased life.”

President Ronald Reagan commented on the Roman Coliseum at the National Prayer Breakfast, February 2, 1984:

This power of prayer can be illustrated by the story that goes back to the fourth century – the monk [Telemachus] living in a little remote village, spending most of his time in prayer…

One day he thought he heard the voice of God telling him to go to Rome…

Weeks and weeks later, he arrived…at a time of a festival in Rome…

He followed a crowd into the Coliseum, and then, there in the midst of this great crowd, he saw the gladiators come forth, stand before the Emperor, and say, ‘We who are about to die salute you.’

And he realized they were going to fight to the death for the entertainment of the crowds.

He cried out, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’

And his voice was lost in the tumult there in the great Colosseum…”

Reagan continued:

And as the games began, he made his way down through the crowd and climbed over the wall and dropped to the floor of the arena.

Suddenly the crowds saw this scrawny little figure making his way out to the gladiators and saying, over and over again, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’

And they thought it was part of the entertainment, and at first they were amused.

But then, when they realized it wasn’t, they grew belligerent and angry…”

Reagan added:

And as he was pleading with the gladiators, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’ one of them plunged his sword into his body.

And as he fell to the sand of the arena in death, his last words were, ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’

And suddenly, a strange thing happened.

The gladiators stood looking at this tiny form lying in the sand. A silence fell over the Colosseum. And then, someplace up in the upper tiers, an individual made his way to an exit and left, and the others began to follow.

And in the dead silence, everyone left the Colosseum. That was the last battle to the death between gladiators in the Roman Colosseum.

Never again did anyone kill or did men kill each other for the entertainment of the crowd…”

Reagan ended:

One tiny voice that could hardly be heard above the tumult. ‘In the Name of Christ, stop!’

It is something we could be saying to each other throughout the world today.”

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Church History, Uncategorized

Valley Forge was a trial of Faith


Valley Forge was a trial of Faith

Washington-Praying-at-Valley-ForgeAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

After the American victory at Saratoga, British General Howe struck back by driving the patriots out of Philadelphia.

On DECEMBER 19, 1777, over 11,000 American soldiers set up camp at Valley Forge, just 25 miles outside Philadelphia.

Meanwhile, another 11,000 Americans were dying on British starving ships.

Yale President Ezra Stiles recounted May 8, 1783:

“‘O that my head were waters, and my eyes a fountain of tears,’ that I might weep the thousands of our brethren that have perished in prison ships–

in one of which, the Jersey, then lying at New York, perished above eleven thousand the last three years–while others have been barbarously exiled to the East Indies for life.”

Soldiers at Valley Forge were from every State in the new union, some as young as 12 and others as old as 60.

Though most were of European descent, some were African American and American Indian.

Among them were Marquis de Lafayette and the future Chief Justice John Marshall.

Lacking food and supplies, soldiers died at the rate of twelve per day.

Over 2,500 froze to death in bitter cold, or perished from hunger, typhoid, jaundice, dysentery, and pneumonia.

In addition, hundreds of horses perished in the freezing weather.

A Committee from Congress reported on the soldiers:

“Feet and legs froze till they became black, and it was often necessary to amputate them.”

Of the wives and children who followed the army, mending clothes, doing laundry and scavenging for food, an estimated 500 died.

Two days before Christmas, George Washington wrote:

“We have this day no less than 2,873 men in camp unfit for duty because they are barefooted and otherwise naked.”

Washington wrote “…that unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place… this Army must inevitably… starve, dissolve, or disperse, in order to obtain subsistence in the best manner they can.”

Hessian Major Carl Leopold Baurmeister noted the only thing that kept the American army from disintegrating was their “spirit of liberty.”

A farmer reportedly observed General Washington kneeling in prayer in the snow.

On December 24, 1983, President Ronald Reagan stated in a Radio Address:

“The image of George Washington kneeling in prayer in the snow is one of the most famous in American history.”

On April 21, 1778, Washington wrote to Lt. Col. John Banister:

“No history…can furnish an instance of an army’s suffering such uncommon hardships as ours has done, and bearing them with the same patience and fortitude –

To see men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes, by which their marches might be traced by the blood from their feet, and almost as often without provisions…

marching through frost and snow, and at Christmas taking up their winter quarters within a day’s march of the enemy, without a house or hut to cover them…

and submitting to it without a murmur, is a mark of patience and obedience which in my opinion can scarce be paralleled.”

Despite these conditions, soldiers prepared to fight.

A Christmas carol that lifted spirits at this time was “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen,” first published in 1760 on a broadsheet in London as a “New Christmas carol.” It was called “the most common and generally popular of all carol tunes”:

“God rest ye merry, gentlemen,
Let nothing you dismay.
For Jesus Christ our Savior,
Was born on Christmas Day;
To save us all from Satan’s power,
When we were gone astray. (Chorus)

O tidings of comfort and joy,
Comfort and joy,
O tidings of comfort and joy.”

In February, 1778, there arrived in the camp a Prussian drill master, Baron Friedrich von Steuben, who had been a member of the elite General Staff of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia.

Baron von Steuben, who was sent with the recommendation of Ben Franklin, drilled the soldiers daily, transforming the American volunteers into an army.

Lutheran Pastor Henry Muhlenberg, whose sons Peter and Frederick served in the First U.S. Congress, wrote in The Notebook of a Colonial Clergyman:

“I heard a fine example today, namely, that His Excellency General Washington rode around among his army yesterday and admonished each and every one to fear God, to put away the wickedness… and to practice the Christian virtues…

God has… marvelously, preserved him from harm in the midst of countless perils, ambuscades, fatigues.”

Washington successfully kept the army intact through the devastating winter, and gave the order at Valley Forge, April 12, 1778:

“The Honorable Congress having thought proper to recommend to the United States of America to set apart Wednesday, the 22nd inst., to be observed as a day of Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer,

that at one time, and with one voice, the righteous dispensations of Providence may be acknowledged, and His goodness and mercy towards our arms supplicated and implored:

The General directs that the day shall be most religiously observed in the Army; that no work shall be done thereon, and that the several chaplains do prepare discourses.”

On May 2, 1778, Washington ordered:

“The Commander-in-Chief directs that Divine service be performed every Sunday…To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal Contributing Editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

Leave a comment

Filed under Commentary, Uncategorized

Daniel Boone died September 26, 1820


Daniel Boone died September 26, 1820

Daniel BooneAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

Daniel Boone served with George Washington in 1755 during the French and Indian War, under British General Edward Braddock.

In 1765, Daniel Boone explored Florida.

He once exclaimed:

“I can’t say I was ever lost, but I was bewildered once for three days.”

In 1767, Daniel Boone, whose Quaker family had pioneered North Carolina’s Yadkin River Valley, began to explore Kentucky.

In 1769, Boone traveled through the Cumberland Gap in the mountains and spent two years hunting and trapping in eastern Kentucky with his friend, John Stewart. Indians captured and separated them, and, unfortunately, Boone eventually found John Stewart’s body shot dead.

In 1773, Daniel Boone and Captain William Russell were ordered by Virginia’s Governor, Lord Dunmore, to settle an area called Castle Woods.

Boone’s 17-year-old son, James, and Captain Russell’s 17-year-old son, Henry, were bringing supplies to Castle Woods when they were ambushed by Indians and brutally massacred. Lord Dunmore wrote:

“In the past year, 1773, the Indians killed…a very promising young man…in one of the back countries…Captain William Russell…was the first that discovered the dismal spectacle of the dead body of his son, mangled in horrible manner.”

Captain William Russell left Daniel Boone in charge of Moore’s Fort in lower Castle Woods from 1773-1775.

When the Revolution began, Lord Dunmore fled and Patrick Henry was elected the first American Governor of Virginia. A fort named him, Fort Patrick Henry, was where Daniel Boone set off from in 1775 to survey Kentucky for the Pennsylvania Company.

Daniel Boone erected a fort on the Kentucky River, which he named Boonesboro.

On July 14, 1776, Boone’s daughter Jemima and her teenage friends, Fanny and Betsy Callaway, decided to leave the confines of Boonesboro and were captured by Shawnee Indians.

Boone and his men caught up with them two days later, ambushed the Indians while they were stopped for a meal, and rescued the girls. James Fenimore Cooper drew from this incident in writing his classic book, The Last of the Mohicans (1826).

On April 24, 1777, Shawnee Indians were recruited by the British Governor of Canada to attack Boonesboro. Led by Chief Blackfish, the attack was repelled, though Daniel Boone was shot in the leg.

As Shawnees destroyed cattle and crops, food supplies running low and settlers needed salt to preserve meat.

In January 1778, having recovered from his wound, Boone led a party to get salt from Licking River. They were captured by Chief Blackfish’s warriors, some taken to Chilicothe, and others to near Detroit.

Boone and his men were made to run the gauntlet, as the Indian custom was to adopt prisoners into their tribe to replace fallen warriors. Boone was given the name, Sheltowee (Big Turtle).

On June 16, 1778, Boone learned that Chief Blackfish planned to attack Boonesboro. Boone escaped and raced 160 miles in five days, on horseback, then on foot, to warn the settlement.

Beginning September 7, 1778, Boone successfully repelled the ten-day siege by Chief Blackfish’s warriors.

In the autumn of 1779, Boone led another party of immigrants to Boonesboro, among whom, according to tradition, was the family of Abraham Lincoln’s grandfather.

Daniel Boone joined General George Rogers Clark’s invasion of Ohio, fighting the Battle of Piqua on August 7, 1780.

In October, 1780, Daniel Boone was hunting with his brother, Edward, when Shawnee Indians attacked. They cut off Edward’s head and took it back as a trophy.

Boone was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel in the Fayette County militia, November 1780.

In April 1781, Boone was elected as to Virginia’s General Assembly, and as he traveled to Richmond to take his seat, British dragoons under Colonel Banastre Tarleton captured him near Charlottesville.

The British released Boone on parole, and not long after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown in October 1781.

Boone returned to Kentucky, and though Cornwallis had surrendered, some British continued to fight.

One of the last battles of the Revolution took place, August 19, 1782. In the Battle of Blue Licks, fighting hand-to-hand against 50 British Loyalists and 300 Indians, Daniel Boone’s son Israel was shot in the neck and killed.

In November 1782, Daniel Boone was a part of the last major campaign of the war with Clark’s expedition into Ohio.

In 1782, Boone was elected sheriff of Fayette County. He bought land in Kentucky but lost it due to poorly prepared titles.

Boone left Kentucky in 1799 and bought land in the Spanish Territory of Missouri, west of the Mississippi River.

When Spain transferred this land to France, and France sold it to the United States as the Louisiana Purchase, 1803, Boone lost his title to this land too.

A special act of Congress gave him back his land just six years before his death.

When the War of 1812 started, Daniel Boone volunteered for duty but was turned down due to his age of 78.

Daniel Boone was known to have a habit of taking the Bible with him on hunting expeditions, often reading it to others around the campfire.

Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca had all of their ten children baptized.

Daniel Boone died SEPTEMBER 26, 1820, and was buried in the Old Bryan Farm graveyard. His remains were moved to Kentucky’s Frankfort Cemetery, though some claim the wrong bones were moved. Hazel Atterbury Spraker wrote in The Boone Family (1982, page 578):

“Daniel was buried near the body of his wife, in a cemetery established in 1803 by David Bryan, upon the bank of a small stream called Teuque Creek about one and one-half miles southeast of the present site of the town of Marthasville in Warren County, Missouri, it being at that time the only Protestant cemetery North of the Missouri River.”

In The Works of Theodore Roosevelt, Vol. IX-The Winning of the West-An account of the exploration and settlement of our country from the Alleghanies to the Pacific (NY: Charles Scribner’s Sons, National Edition, 1926, p. 43), Theodore Roosevelt wrote:

“Boone…occupied quite a prominent position, and served as a Representative in the Virginia legislature, while his fame as a hunter and explorer was now spread abroad in the United States, and even Europe.

To travelers and newcomers generally, he was always pointed out as the first discoverer of Kentucky; and, being modest, self-contained, and self-reliant, he always impressed them favorably…

Boone’s creed in matters of morality and religion was as simple and straightforward as his own character.

Late in life he wrote to one of his kinsfolk (sister-in-law, Sarah Boone, October 17, 1816):

‘The religion I have is to love and fear God, believe in Jesus Christ, do all the good to my neighbor, and myself that I can, do as little harm as I can help, and trust on God’s mercy for the rest.’

The old pioneer always kept the respect of red men and white, of friend and foe, for he acted according to his belief.”

A direct descendent of Daniel Boone is the award-winning actor and singer, Pat Boone.


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

Leave a comment

Filed under History

247 – Sept. 04 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Bunyan, John

He preached to as many as 3,000 in London

“Wednesday Sept. 04, 1688 …was kept in prayer and humiliation for this Heavy Stroak upon us, ye Death of deare Brother Bunyan. Apoynted also that Wednesday next be kept in praire and humiliation on the same Account.” John Bunyan, their most loved pastor had died on Friday, Aug. 31 while on a preaching trip to London, England. The news had not reached his congregation in Bedford until they had gathered to worship the following Sunday. Bunyan often preached to as many as 3,000 in London after spending nearly 13 years in Bedford jail for refusing a license to preach the gospel. There he had writtenPilgrim’s Progress and other great works. In 1672 the Act of Pardon had set him free. He was born to a tinker (a repairer of pots and pans). He married in 1647 and was saved and baptized into the membership of Bedford church in 1655. His wife died the same year and he remarried in 1659. He had a precious blind daughter who visited him while in jail. He died as he was born, in poverty. His death came when he was exposed to a heavy rain which brought on a high fever, and in ten days the great preacher was with the Lord. [John Brown, John Bunyan His Life Times and Work (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., 1888), pp. 390-91.  Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp.  483-85.

The post 247 – Sept. 04 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

Parson to Person THE CALENDAR ENDS HERE


Author: Andrew Dillard

THE CALENDAR ENDS HERE

One of the universal requisites by which life among men is constantly reckoned is the passage of time. Aside from the devices that measure it in seconds, minutes, hours, there is the calendar that measures days, weeks, months, and years. The existence of men, and other life forms, is thus measured in concert with calendar changes. Fortunes are spent in vain attempts to reverse the years, but all that is achieved is a fleeting façade. Then on an uncircled date, the calendar stops, and the measurement of life is chiseled in stone from birth to death. Some of those dates indicate a lengthy life; others extremely short, but for each one, his/her calendar stopped on a specific date.
Preserved history is strewn with instances of calendar stoppage as windows of wisdom for all succeeding generations. The whole world was given 120 years in Noah’s day. The calendar would not yield another day beyond that. Destruction was indelibly marked. The calendar stopped there. The calendar stopped for all the Hebrew men above 20 years of age, as well as their great leader, Moses before they reached the destination and reason for leaving Egypt. They would not enter the Promised Land due to faithless action. Their calendar stopped there.
Forty days were determined on Nineveh, that great city of the Medo-persian Empire, as Jonah faithfully proclaimed. Their calendar would not admit day 41. But the God of the calendar was entreated by them in repentance, and their judgment was averted. Do you understand this?
Luke 12:20 tells us of a rich man who was, in the final analysis, a fool. He worked hard. He laid up much. He pulled down his barns and built bigger ones until at last he concluded that he had enough laid up for many years, so it was time to eat, drink, and be merry. But it was not to be. His calendar stopped on the very night of his retirement, leaving his wealth to others.
The date is not marked in red or circled on the calendar, but the swift, unalterable passage of time is consistently pressing every living thing forward to it. It is the date the calendar stops and time is no more. It is eternity where clocks and calendars are not, and the state of life is forever fixed. Soon, men will say in remembrance of you, his/her calendar stopped here. Are you ready for that? Believe me, Jesus is the only acceptable preparation for the permanent stoppage of your calendar. Repentance from sin, and placing faith in Jesus are the wisest things any person will do in the days of his calendar

1 Comment

Filed under Inspirational

The Better Departure  


 

Philippians 1:23

“For I am in a stait betwixt two, having a desire to depart, and to be with Christ; which is far better,” Philippians 1:23.

 

Paul was torn between two desires. Philippians 1:21 tells us what these two desires were. Paul struggled between the desire to live for Christ and to depart to eternity.

In my life I also struggle with the idea of death versus life, but not in the same manner Paul did. My fleshly struggle is the desire to live, to keep on enjoying the earthly things. I often fear death. It is not because I want to stay here for God’s glory, I desire to stay here for my glory! Then, I look into God’s Word and search my heart.

When I understand that this life is not about me, it helps me to put life and death into its proper perspective. I can then see that I am called to live for the glory of God!

I pray that I, like Paul, will be driven to bring God maximum glory with my life on earth. I also anticipate the day that I will finally experience the great things He has laid up for me in eternity!

 

JUST A THOUGHT

Are you looking forward to the better departure?

Nathan Rogers

1 Comment

Filed under Inspirational