Tag Archives: christianity

Great Pillars of American Liberty


Not long ago, I watched a noted atheist – an ACLU member – venomously attacked American Christians for daring to stand up for what they called the right of their children to have access to the truth in the classroom about America’s unique founding, a founding centered not just on the triumph of reason, as some wrongfully claim, but on the triumph of reason coupled with faith, particularly the Christian faith.

Coming to this atheists’ defense, one of the interviewers cited as “proof” that America was not founded by Christians – nor upon the principles of Christianity – the 1796 Treaty of Tripoli, which declared in Article XI, “the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion.” Here we have it, he declared, legal proof under the supremacy clause that this must be and still is the case – but more than that, with key founder President John Adams’ signature on it, a personal, in-your-face testimony against Christians and their incessant claims about God’s hand in founding this nation.

Now hold on there…

Notwithstanding that such a claim contradicts everything in John Adams’ writings to the contrary (we’ll get to that in a minute) – and the rest of the key founders as well – and notwithstanding the contradictory testimony of two centuries before the American founding and the nearly two centuries’ old testimony after the American founding, both of which embracing America’s Christian tradition in Congress, in the courts, in presidential speeches, in private and public classrooms, and in state and local governments, without question—notwithstanding that little sidestep—here’s yet another: The U.S. does not have and has not had the original copy of this treaty for at least two centuries (it was and is lost); while the two originals that do exist (in Italian and Arabic) have no such phrase nor any such clause in the treaty, period.

So what do we have then? A ‘certified copy’ written by a man, Joel Barlow, who brought to publication Thomas Paine’s diatribe against Christianity, “The Age of Reason,” and whose motives might be described as suspect.

The Avalon Project at Yale University, without assigning any motives to Mr. Barlow, notes of the blatant discrepancy:

As even a casual examination of the annotated translation of 1930 shows, the Barlow translation is at best a poor attempt at a paraphrase or summary of the sense of the Arabic; and even as such its defects throughout are obvious and glaring. Most extraordinary (and wholly unexplained) is the fact that Article 11 of the Barlow translation, with its famous phrase, “the government of the United States of America is not in any sense founded on the Christian Religion,” does not exist at all. There is no Article 11. The Arabic text which is between Articles 10 and 12 is in form a letter, crude and flamboyant and withal quite unimportant. . How that script came to be written and to be regarded, as in the Barlow translation, as Article 11 of the treaty as there written, is a mystery and seemingly must remain so. Nothing in the diplomatic correspondence of the time throws any light whatever on the point (1)

These Yale researchers note next:

[E]vidence of the erroneous character of the Barlow translation has been in the archives of the Department of State since perhaps 1800 or thereabouts; for in the handwriting of James Leander Cathcart [the American Consul to Tripoli, at the time] is the statement . that the Barlow translation is “extremely erroneous.” (2)

A “poor attempt at a paraphrase,” “defects throughout,” “obvious and glaring,” “extremely erroneous,” a “famous phrase [that] does not exist at all”; of these I have little doubt. But returning to Mr. Barlow’s motives in penning such a copy upon provisions that did not exist: his connection to the doctrines of the fallen angel Thomas Paine, and his own descent from his former involvement in the ministry into what was then dubbed “liberal Christianity” looms large, and helps unravel “the mystery.” So do a couple of other possible character flaws. A little over a decade after the signing of the Treaty of Tripoli, in an April 24, 1812 letter from James Madison to Thomas Jefferson, we read of Madison’s concerns about Barlow’s fidelity to representing America in yet another land, France:

A letter from Barlow to Granger fills us with serious apprehensions that he is burning his fingers with matters which will work great embarrassment and mischief here, and which his instructions could not have suggested. (3)

Madison was concerned about the man’s fidelity to his American commission and common sense. John Adams had similar concerns. After denouncing the recent works of Tom Paine as “the Ravings and Rantings of Bedlam,” in a July 15, 1813 letter to Jefferson, Adams moved to the subject of Tom Paine’s publisher, Joel Barlow, who was “about to record Tom Paine as the great author of the American Revolution!”—to which Adams retorted, “If he was; I desire that my name may be blotted out forever, from its records.” (4) For Barlow to even consider repeating this outrageous fallacy for the reading of future generations demonstrated his willingness to be the pawn of a man who had turned not only on his faith, but on all of Christianity (including on America’s Founders, many of whom he came to despise, and who would revoke his citizenship over his newfound “Enemy of the Faith” status), and if not that or that alone, then Barlow’s tendency toward delusion or rank dishonesty and fraud – and to what end?, to what end?

Finally, the original Treaty of Tripoli of 1805 that IS in our possession and IS signed by a Founding President has no such Barlow inspired, anti-Christian clause. (5)

The bottom line: If this is the best Founding Era ‘proof’ these historical revisionists can come up with against Christianity (and John Adams) it is pathetic. – An original treaty signed by Adams that is not the original, and in fact is not signed by Adams (on the copy he cites), and is at odds with both of the originals that we do have, and was declared by the then American Consul to Tripoli, Leander Cathcart, to be an “extremely erroneous” copy, one at odds with the follow-on treaty that was signed but a few years later (yet another proof against this lie), and all of this based on a copy written by a man whose motives and judgment were highly suspect. Pathetic indeed.

Equally pathetic is any attempt to attach the noble name of John Adams to a denunciation of America’s godly beginnings.

A small sample of the real John Adams reveals just how deep the fraud of this revisionist account. When Adam’s was asked by an educational group of youth to identify America’s founding pillars, here is what he answered in a document that CAN be authenticated:

Science [the science of government] and Morals are the great Pillars on which this Country has been raised to its present population, opulence and prosperity, and these alone, can advance, support and preserve it.

He then added:

Without wishing to damp the ardor of curiosity, or influence the freedom of inquiry, I will hazard a prediction, that after the most industrious and impartial researches, the longest liver of you all will find no Principles, Institutions, or Systems of Education, more fit, IN GENERAL to be transmitted to your posterity, than those you have received from your Ancestors. (6)

Years later in a letter to Jefferson, Mr. Adams further elaborated on what he meant that day:

Could my Answer be understood, by any candid reader or hearer, to recommend, to all others[:] The general principles, on which the Fathers achieved Independence were the only principles in which that beautiful assembly . could unite. And what were these general principles? I answer, the general Principles of Christianity, in which all these Sects were United: And the general principles of English and American liberty which had united all parties in America, in majorities sufficient to assert and maintain her Independence. Now I will avow, that I then believed, and now believe, that those general Principles of Christianity, are as eternal and immutable, as the Existence and Attributes of God; and that those Principles of Liberty, are as unalterable as human Nature and our terrestrial, mundane System. I could therefore safely say, consistently with all my then and present information, that I believed they would never make discoveries in contradiction to these General Principles.” (7)

This is typical John Adams, the same man who laid it on the line quite clearly that “Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people,” that it was “wholly inadequate to the government of any other.” (8)

And again from Adams:

Statesmen may plan and speculate for liberty, but it is religion and morality alone, which can establish the principles upon which freedom can securely stand. (9)

And again:

The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity, and humanity.(10)

And, once more, even eleven years before Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence declares John Adams:

[our rights preceded government], rights that cannot be repealed or restrained by human laws – Rights derived from the great Legislator of the Universe. (11)

Well, these are the roots, the Great Pillars that past and future generations of youth ought to frequently refer back to as learning and science move forward, these “eternal and immutable” principles that lay at the foundation of everything good, lest in the name of progress we pass down to posterity nothing more than a high-brow, high-tech house of cards.

But here’s one more vital point: Adams would have nothing to do with the lie that passes around the university and public school system today as so-called solid granite truth, that America’s roots go deep into another soil, that of the amoral, libertine, European ‘Enlightenment, they tell us.  Here is what Adam’s said of that ‘illustrious’ founding group:

[They appear] to me like young scholars from a college of sailors flushed with recent pay or prize money, mounted on wild horses, lashing and spearing, till they would kill the horses and break their own necks. (12)

He wasn’t kidding. And the French Revolution, the Napoleonic Wars, two world wars, the invention and perpetuation of mass murdering, liberty destroying communism and fascism, and now the socialist, world government promoting, secularist European Union on that continent referred to by Adams, proved him prophetic. License is not liberty. The European Enlightenment with all of its anti-God, anti-private property, anti-limited government rhetoric is not the legacy this country’s ancestors passed down to our children. Yet it is to these latter so-called fellow ‘founders’, these atheists who spawned the greatest bloodletting tyranny in history, are they who the ACLU and the revisionist ‘scholars’ young and old (yes, they who have hijacked America’s educational system, and rewritten America’s story to fit their Godless, socialist paradigm) and the very goons they would have you and your kids look back to – look back like Lot’s wife to the polluted, prideful, despotic people and political philosophies our progenitors barely escaped, back to the land where the battle cry ‘Liberty! Equality! Fraternity!” hid a more absolute, more thorough ‘Tyranny!’ Robbery! and Mass Murder!

Adams had it right. One pillar of salt is enough. We don’t need 300 million more. Not on our watch.

Steve Farrell is the Founder and Editor-In-Chief of The Moral Liberal, one of the original pundits at NewsMax.com (1999-2007), and the author of the highly praised inspirational novel Dark Rose


1. Miller, Hunter. “The Avalon Project at Yale Law School: The Barbary Treaties: Tripoli 1796. Found online at: http://www.yale.edu/

2. Ibid.

3. Madison, James. “Writings of James Madison, Volume 2, 1794-1815,” p. 533.

4. Cappon, Lester J. “The Adams-Jefferson Letters: The Complete Correspondence between Thomas Jefferson & Abigail and John Adams,” University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill and London, 1959, renewed 1987, p. 358.

5. “Treaty of Peace and Amity, Signed at Tripoli June 4, 1805, online at http://www.yale.edu/

6. Cappon, Lester J. Quoted from Adams’ answer to “the Address of the Young Men of the City of Philadelphia, the District of South Wark, and the Northern Liberties,” p. 339.

7. Ibid., pgs. 339-340.

8. Adams, John; Adams, Charles Francis, ed.. “The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States, Volume IX,” Boston: Little Brown, 1854, p. 229.

9. Ibid. p. 401

10. Adams, John; Butterfield, L.H.. “Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, Volume III” Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1961, p. 234, from diary entry for June 21, 1776.

11. Adams, John; Taylor. Robert J., editor. “Papers of John Adams, Volume 1,” Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1977- p. 109, as quoted in Grant, James. “John Adams: Party of One,” Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2005, p. 62.

12. Cannon, Lester. J. Pgs. 357-358.

Author’s Additional note:

There were other factors at play that may have influenced Joel Barlow to insert such ideas in his “extremely erroneous” copy of the original. Read this insightful article by David Barton at http://wallbuilders.com/resources/search/detail.php?ResourceID=5

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Theodore Roosevelt born October 27, 1858

Theodore Roosevelt born October 27, 1858

theodore-rooseveltAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

Theodore Roosevelt was born OCTOBER 27, 1858.

His wife and mother died on Valentine’s Day, 1884.

Depressed, he left to ranch in the Dakotas.

Returning to New York, he entered politics and rose to Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

He resigned during the Spanish-American War, organized the first Volunteer Cavalry, “the Rough Riders,” and captured Cuba’s San Juan Hill.

Elected Vice-President under William McKinley, he became America’s youngest President in 1901.

In 1909, Roosevelt warned:

“The thought of modern industry in the hands of Christian charity is a dream worth dreaming.

The thought of industry in the hands of paganism is a nightmare beyond imagining.

The choice between the two is upon us.”

In his book Fear God and Take Your Part, 1916, Theodore Roosevelt wrote:

“Christianity is not the creed of Asia and Africa at this moment solely because the seventh century Christians of Asia and Africa
had trained themselves not to fight, whereas the Moslems were trained to fight.

Christianity was saved in Europe solely because the peoples of Europe fought.

If the peoples of Europe in the 7th and 8th centuries, and on up to and including the 17th century, had not possessed a military equality with, and gradually a growing superiority over the Mohammedans who invaded Europe, Europe would at this moment be Mohammedan and the Christian religion would be exterminated.”

Theodore Roosevelt continued:

“Wherever the Mohammedans have had complete sway, wherever the Christians have been unable to resist them by the sword, Christianity has ultimately disappeared.

From the hammer of Charles Martel to the sword of Jan Sobieski, Christianity owed its safety in Europe to the fact that it was able to show that it could and would fight as well as the Mohammedan aggressor.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Cornwallis surrendered October 19, 1781

Cornwallis surrendered October 19, 1781

Battle of Cowpens paintingAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

British Colonel Tarleton was known as ‘the bloody butcher’ for letting his dragoons bayonet and hack hundreds of surrendering American soldiers at Buford’s Massacre, May 29, 1780.

In January of 1781, Colonel Tarleton with 1,200 dragoons were pursuing American troops, but General Daniel Morgan led them into a trap at the Battle of Cowpens, killing 100 British and capturing 800.

When British General Cornwallis heard the news, he was leaning on his sword, and leaned so forcibly that it snapped in two.

Cornwallis gave chase, even abandoning his slow supply wagons along the way, but was unable to catch the Americans, now led by General Nathaniel Greene.

Providential flash floods and rising rivers allowed the Americans to escape.

Without supplies, Cornwallis was ordered to move his 8,000 troops to a defensive position where the York River entered Chesapeake Bay.

By this time, Ben Franklin and Marquis de Lafayette had succeeded in their efforts to persuade French King Louis XVI to send ships and troops the help the Americans.

French Admiral de Grasse left off fighting the British in the West Indies and sailed 24 ships to the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, where, in the Battle of the Capes, he drove off 19 British ships which were sent to evacuate Cornwallis’ men.

De Grasse’s 3,000 French troops and General Rochambeau’s 6,000 French troops hurriedly joined General Lafayette’s division as they marched to help General Washington trap Cornwallis against the sea.

They joined the troops of Generals Benjamin Lincoln, Baron von Steuben, Modrecai Gist, Henry Knox and John Peter Muhlenberg.

Altogether, 17,000 French and American troops surrounded Cornwallis and, on OCTOBER 19, 1781, he surrendered.

Yale President Ezra Stiles wrote, May 8, 1783:

“Who but God could have ordained the critical arrival of the Gallic (French) fleet, so as to… assist… in the siege… of Yorktown?…

Should we not… ascribe to a Supreme energy… the wise… generalship displayed by General Greene… leaving the… roving Cornwallis to pursue his helter-skelter ill fated march into Virginia…

It is God who had raised up for us a…powerful ally… a chosen army and a naval force: who sent us a Rochambeau… to fight side by side with a Washington… in the… Battle of Yorktown.”

General Washington wrote:

“To diffuse the general Joy through every breast the General orders… Divine Service to be performed tomorrow in the several Brigades…

The Commander-in-Chief earnestly recommends troops not on duty should universally attend with that gratitude of heart which the recognition of such astonishing Interposition of Providence demands.”

The next year, October 11, 1782, the Congress of the Confederation passed:

“It being the indispensable duty of all nations…to offer up their supplications to Almighty God…the United States in Congress assembled…

do hereby recommend it to the inhabitants of these States in general, to observe…the last Thursday, in the 28th day of November next, as a Day of Solemn Thanksgiving to God for all his mercies.”

On September 3, 1783, the Revolutionary War officially ended with the Treaty of Paris, signed by Ben Franklin, John Adams, John Jay and David Hartley:

“In the name of the Most Holy and Undivided Trinity.

It having pleased the Divine Providence to dispose the hearts of the most serene and most potent Prince George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain…and of the United States of America, to forget all past misunderstandings and differences…

Done at Paris, this third day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three.”

With the war over, Massachusetts Governor John Hancock proclaimed November 8, 1783:

“The Citizens of these United States have every Reason for Praise and Gratitude to the God of their salvation…

I do…appoint…the 11th day of December next (the day recommended by the Congress to all the States) to be religiously observed as a Day of Thanksgiving and Prayer,

That all the people may then assemble to celebrate…that he hath been pleased to continue to us the Light of the Blessed Gospel…

That we also offer up fervent supplications… to cause pure Religion and Virtue to flourish…and to fill the world with his glory.”

Ronald Reagan, in proclaiming a Day of Prayer, stated January 27, 1983:

“In 1775, the Continental Congress proclaimed the first National Day of Prayer…

In 1783, the Treaty of Paris officially ended the long, weary Revolutionary War during which a National Day of Prayer had been proclaimed every spring for eight years.”

The Journal of the U.S. House of Representatives recorded that on March 27, 1854, the 33rd Congress voted unanimously to print Rep. James Meacham’s report, which stated:

“Down to the Revolution, every colony did sustain religion in some form. It was deemed peculiarly proper that the religion of liberty should be upheld by a free people…

Had the people, during the Revolution, had a suspicion of any attempt to war against Christianity, that Revolution would have been strangled in its cradle.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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The Mayflower set sail September 16, 1620

The Mayflower set sail September 16, 1620

Pilgrims departing on Mayflower at Leyden

American Minute with Bill Federer

SEPTEMBER 16, 1620, according to the Gregorian Calendar, 102 passengers set sail on the Pilgrims’ ship, Mayflower.

Their 66-day journey of 2,750 miles encountered storms so rough the beam supporting the main mast cracked and was propped back in place with “a great iron screw.”

One youth, John Howland, was swept overboard by a freezing wave and rescued. His descendants include Ralph Waldo Emerson, Humphrey Bogart, Franklin D. Roosevelt and George W. Bush.

During the Pilgrims’ voyage, a man died and a mother gave birth.

Intending to land in Virginia, they were blown off-course.

Of their landing in Massachusetts, Governor William Bradford wrote:

“Being thus arrived in a good harbor, and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven who had brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all the perils and miseries thereof, again to set their feet on the firm and stable earth, their proper element.”

Though half died that first bitter winter, Governor William Bradford wrote:

“Last and not least, they cherished a great hope and inward zeal of laying good foundations…for the propagation and advance of the gospel of the kingdom of Christ in the remote parts of the world.”

At the Bicentennial Celebration of the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock, Secretary of State Daniel Webster stated December 22, 1820:

“There is a…sort of genius of the place, which…awes us. We feel that we are on the spot where the first scene of our history was laid; where the hearths and altars of New England were first placed; where Christianity, and civilization…made their first lodgement, in a vast extent of country…

‘If God prosper us,’ might have been the… language of our fathers, when they landed upon this Rock, ‘…we shall here begin a work which shall last for ages… We shall fill this region of the great continent…with civilization and Christianity…”

Daniel Webster continued:

“The morning that beamed…saw the Pilgrims already at home…a government and a country were to commence, with the very first foundations laid under the divine light of the Christian religion…

Our ancestors established their system of government on morality and religious sentiment…Whatever makes men good Christians, makes them good citizens.

Our fathers came here to enjoy their religion free and unmolested; and, at the end of two centuries, there is nothing upon which we can pronounce more confidently…than of the inestimable importance of that religion to man…”

Daniel Webster warned:

“We are bound…to convince the world that order and law, religion and morality, the rights of conscience, the rights of persons, and the rights of property, may all be preserved and secured, in the most perfect manner, by a government entirely and purely elective.

If we fail in this, our disaster will be signal, and will furnish an argument…in support of those opinions which maintain that government can rest safely on nothing but power and coercion…”

Continuing his 1820 speech, Daniel Webster added a rebuke:

“The African slave-trader is a pirate and a felon; and in the sight of Heaven, an offender far beyond the ordinary depth of human guilt…

If there be…any participation in this traffic, let us pledge ourselves here, upon the rock of Plymouth, to extirpate and destroy it…

I invoke the ministers of our religion, that they proclaim its denunciation of these crimes, and add its solemn sanctions to the authority of human laws.

If the pulpit be silent whenever or wherever there may be a sinner bloody with this guilt within the hearing of its voice, the pulpit is false to its trust…”

Daniel Webster reflected further:

“Whoever shall hereafter write this part of our history…will be able to record no…lawless and despotic acts, or any successful usurpation.

His page will contain no exhibition of…civil authority habitually trampled down by military power, or of a community crushed by the burden of taxation…

He will speak…of that happy condition, in which the restraint and coercion of government are almost invisible and imperceptible…”

Daniel Webster stated further:

“Finally, let us not forget the religious character of our origin.

Our fathers were brought hither by their high veneration for the Christian religion.

They journeyed by its light, and labored in its hope.

They sought to incorporate its principles with the elements of their society, and to diffuse its influence through all their institutions, civil, political, or literary.

Let us cherish these sentiments, and extend this influence still more widely; in the full conviction, that that is the happiest society which partakes in the highest degree of the mild and peaceful spirit of Christianity…”

Daniel Webster concluded:

“Advance, then, ye future generations!

We would hail you, as you rise in your long succession, to fill the places which we now fill…

We welcome you to the blessings of good government and religious

We welcome you to…the happiness of kindred, and parents, and children.

We welcome you to the immeasurable blessings of rational existence, the immortal hope of Christianity, and the light of everlasting truth!”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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President Calvin Coolidge’s concern for youth

President Calvin Coolidge’s concern for youth

Calvin CoolidgeAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

On SEPTEMBER 21, 1924, America’s 30th President, Calvin Coolidge, addressed the Holy Name Society in Washington, D.C., saying:

“The worst evil that could be inflicted upon the youth of the land would be to leave them without restraint and completely at the mercy of their own uncontrolled inclinations.

Under such conditions education would be impossible, and all orderly development intellectually or morally would be hopeless.”

Calvin Coolidge continued:

“The Declaration of Independence…claims…the ultimate source of authority by stating…they were… ‘appealing to the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of’ their ‘intentions.’…

The foundations of our independence and our Government rests upon basic religious convictions.

Back of the authority of our laws is the authority of the Supreme Judge of the World, to whom we still appeal.”

President Calvin Coolidge concluded:

“It seems to me perfectly plain that the authority of law, the right to equality, liberty and property, under American institutions, have for their foundation reverence for God.

If we could imagine that to be swept away, these institutions of our American government could not long survive.”

Chief Justice of New York’s Supreme Court, James Kent, compiled Commentaries on American Law, 1826-30, and wrote in the case People v. Ruggles, 1811:

“Christianity was parcel of the law, and to cast contumelious reproaches upon it, tended to weaken the foundation of moral obligation, and the efficacy of oaths…

Whatever strikes at the root of Christianity tends manifestly to the dissolution of civil government…”

Chief Justice Kent continued:

“The authorities show that blasphemy against God and…profane ridicule of Christ or the Holy Scriptures…are offenses punishable at common law, whether uttered by words or writings…because it tends to corrupt the morals of the people, and to destroy good order…

The people of this State, in common with the people of this country, profess the general doctrines of Christianity, as the rule of their faith and practice;

and to scandalize the author of these doctrines is not only…impious, but…is a gross violation of decency and good order…”

Chief Justice Kent concluded:

“Nothing could be more injurious to the tender morals of the young, than to declare such profanity lawful…

The free, equal, and undisturbed enjoyment of religious opinion, whatever it may be, and free and decent discussions on any religious subject, is granted and secured; but to revile…the religion professed by almost the whole community, is an abuse of that right.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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Muslims have been killing Christians for a very long time


Syria mapAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

Did you know Assyria was the world’s first empire.

It is mentioned by name in the Book of Genesis, chapter 1, verse 14:

“And the name of the third river is Hiddekel (Tigris): that is it which goeth toward the east of Assyria.”

Around the year 2371 BC, as related by Peter BetBasoo, the Assyrian Empire under Sargon of Akkad absorbed the original Sumerian civilization of the Mesopotamian Valley.

The oldest piece of literature on Earth is in the original Assyrian language of Akkadian – the Epic of Gilgamesh, written around 2500 BC.

The ancient Assyrian city of Nineveh, near present-day Mosul, became a major religious/cultural center around 1800 BC, contemporary to the time of Abraham.

In 760 BC, the Old Testament prophet Jonah preached in Nineveh and it repented.

Jonah’s tomb existed there until it was destroyed by fundamentalist Muslims of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) on July 24, 2014.

In 727-721 BC, King Shalmaneser V ruled the Neo-Assyrian Empire and carried Israel’s ten northern tribes into captivity.

King Sennacherib, 705-681 BC, made Nineveh one of the most magnificent capitals in the world.

The word “Arab” is actually the Assyrian word “westerner,” first used by King Sennacherib in telling his conquest of the “ma’rabayeh”–westerners.

Assyrians and Babylonians laid down the fundamental basis of mathematics, the Pythagorean Theorem, the concept of zero and designed parabolic domes and arches.

Sometime in the 8th century BC, Arameans immigrated into Mesopotamia and their Aramaic language became the lingua franca for the entire region, replacing the languages of the Akkadians/Assyro-Babylonian peoples.

Aramaic was spoken through the time of Christ, and was still in use by Christians in the small Syrian village of Ma’loula till it was overrun by fundamentalist Muslim rebels in September of 2013.

Beginning in 538 BC, for the next seven centuries Assyria was ruled by other empires:

Persian Achaemenid;
Macedonian (Alexander the Great);
Parthian Arascid;
Roman; and

Greeks first began using the shortened name “Syria” to refer to western Assyria.

With the arrival of Christianity, Saint Thomas, Saint Bartholemew and Saint Thaddeus founded the Assyrian Christian Church in 33 AD.

A dialect of the Aramaic language called ‘Syriac’ became the new lingua franca of that part of the world.

The Apostle Paul evangelized in Syria, beginning in the city of Damascus.

The very word “Christian” was first used for followers of Jesus Christ in Antioch, Syria. (Acts 11:23-26)

By the year 265 AD, Syria was one of the first nations to be completely Christian.

In the 4th, 5th and 6th centuries, Christian Assyrians began a systematic translation of Greek works in religion, science, philosophy (Socrates, Plato and Aristotle) and medicine (Galen) into Syriac.

After the invasion of Arab Muslims in the 7th century, Syrian scholars translated Greek works into Arabic.

The book, How Greek Science Passed to the Arabs, documented the work of 22 scholars, 20 of which were Christian Assyrians, with only 1 Persian and 1 Arab.

These translations were later taken by Moors into Spain, where Europeans translated them into Latin, laying the groundwork for the Renaissance.

One of the greatest Christian Assyrian achievements of the Fourth Century was the founding of the first university in the world, the School of Nisibis. It had three departments, theology, philosophy and medicine, and became a center of intellectual development in the Middle East and the model for the first Italian university.

In the 5th century, nine Christian Syrian Monks translated Greek, Hebrew, and Syriac works into the Ethiopian language of Ge’ez. They organized Christian monastic orders and schools, some of which are still in existence.

Saint John of Damascus in Syria, the Patriarch of Jerusalem, was one of the greatest scholars in the 8th century.

Assyrian Christians pioneered hospitals, with the Bakhteesho family having nine generations of physicians and founding the great medical school at Gundeshapur in present-day Iran.

The Assyrian Christian physician, Hunayn ibn-Ishaq, wrote a textbook on ophthalmology in 950 AD which remained the authoritative source until 1800 AD.

Assyrian Christian philosopher Job of Edessa developed a physical theory of the universe rivaling Aristotle’s.

The literary output of the Assyrians and Jews was vast. After Latin and Greek, the third largest corpus of Christian writing was in the Assyrian “Syriac” language.

Assyrian missionaries brought Nestorian “Syriac” Christianity into Mesopotamia, then into the Persian Sassanid Empire (including parts of modern-day Iran and Iraq), as well as into India, Central Asia, the Uyghurs, the Tang Dynasty of China, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines.

As Arab Muslims swept through the Middle East beginning in 630 AD, Chaldean and Babylonian astronomers were forcibly Islamized till they eventually disappeared.

As Muslims conquered trade routes to the east, they co-opted advances made by other civilizations and claimed them as their own.

The hundreds of years of rich Assyrian civilization was expropriated into the Arab culture.

As the heavy burdens of the “dhimmi” status and intermittent persecutions caused the Assyrian Christian community to decline, the so-called Golden Age of Islam correspondingly declined.

Then Turkish Muslims invaded.

Gregory Bar-Hebraeus (1226-1286), a Syrian Orthodox Church leader, wrote how Turkish Muslim tolerance toward Christians turned to hate:

“And having seen very much modesty and other habits of this kind among Christian people, certainly the Mongols loved them greatly at the beginning of their kingdom, a time ago somewhat short. But their love hath turned to such intense hatred that they cannot even see them with their eyes approvingly.”

In 1268, Mamluk Sultan Baibars conquered Antioch, Syria, and slaughtered all the Christian and Jewish men and sold the women into slavery, smashed church crosses, burned Bibles, desecrated graves, and dragged every priest, deacon, and monk to the altar and slit their throats.

He destroyed the Church of St. Paul and the Cathedral of St. Peter.

In response to cries for help, King Louis IX of France set sail from Aigues-Mortes in 1270 leading the 8th Crusade to come to the aid of Christian states in Syria. King Louis IX was diverted to Tunis where he was defeated and died of dysentery.

In 1271, Edward I, the future King of England, undertook a 9th Crusade to help in Syria.

Tripoli (in present-day Lebanon) fell to Mamluk Sultan Qalawun in 1289, and Acre fell in 1291 to Mamluk Sultan as-Ashraf Khalil in a bloody siege, ending the last traces of Christian rule in Syria.

As Marco Polo traveled east in 1271 AD, he noted Assyrian Christian missionaries had converted tens of thousands in Indian and China to Syrian “Nestorian” Christianity.

Even the influential mother of Kublai Khan, Sorghaghtani Beki, was a Nestorian Christian.

The first Mongolian system of writing used the Assyrian “Syriac” alphabet, with the name “Tora Bora” being an Assyrian phrase meaning “arid mountain.”

Nestorian Christianity declined in China when the Ming Dynasty forced out Mongolian and other foreign influences.

Nestorian Christianity was eradicated from Persia and Central Asia by the Muslim crusader Tamerlane, who massacred an estimated 17 million.

In 1399, Tamerlane invaded Syria, sacked Aleppo and captured Damascus, massacring the inhabitants and erecting towers made out of skulls.

Northern Iraq had remained Assyrian Christian until Tamerlane systematically decimated the population.

When Turks began imposing the Turkish language throughout the Ottoman Empire, Syrian Christian scholars were responsible for preserving the Arabic language.

For centuries, Syria was under Ottoman Muslim rule.

In 1867, Mark Twain visited Syria, writing in his book Innocents Abroad:

“Then we called at…the mausoleum of the five thousand Christians who were massacred in Damascus in 1861 by the Turks.

They say those narrow streets ran blood for several days, and that men, women and children were butchered indiscriminately and left to rot by hundreds all through the Christian quarter; they say, further, that the stench was dreadful.

All the Christians who could get away fled from the city, and the Mohammedans would not defile their hands by burying the ‘infidel dogs.’

The thirst for blood extended to the high lands of Hermon and Anti-Lebanon, and in a short time 25,000 more Christians were massacred and their possessions laid waste…

How they hate a Christian in Damascus! — and pretty much all over Turkeydom as well.”

In 1908, a Turkish Spring began.

The brief euphoria when the Ottoman tyrant Sultan Abd-ul-Hamid was forced from power quickly turned to horror.

Three Pashas, known as “The Young Turks” promoted the idea of “Ottomanization” — creating a homogeneous Turkey of one race, one language, and one religion – Islam.

Fundamentalist Turkish Muslims systematically expelled or exterminated hundreds of thousands of non-Muslims.

While the world focused on Germany, France and England during World War I, Turkish Muslims massacred ethnic minorities.

Over 1.5 million Armenian men, women and children were killed, 750,000 Syrians, and 1 million Greeks, Albanians, Serbs, and Bulgarians.

Historian Arnold Toynbee wrote:

“Turkish rule…is now, oppressing or massacring, slaughtering or driving from their homes, the Christian population of Greek or Bulgarian stock…

Armenia and Cilicia, and Syria, where within the last two years it has been destroying its Christian subjects…

The Young Turkish gang who gained power when they had deposed Abd-ul-Hamid, have surpassed even that monster of cruelty in their slaughter.”

After World War I, the Ottoman Empire fell.

Britain took Iraq as a protectorate, allowing them independence 1932, but one of Iraq’s first governmental acts was to massacre 3,000 Assyrians in the village of Simmele.

France took Lebanon and Syria as protectorates, allowing them independence in 1943 and 1946, respectively.

Though a republic, Syria soon suffered upheaval, coup d’etat, socialism, riots, civil disorder and the “Arab Spring” led by the Muslim Brotherhood whose goal is to re-establish the caliphate – a totalitarian Islamic State.

Since the invasion of Islam in 630 AD, the Assyrian Church of the East, the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Syriac Catholic Church, the Maronite Church, and the Chaldean Catholic Church, quietly suffered 33 major genocides, averaging one every 40 years.

As reported by CNSnews.com, the Patriarch of Antioch, Gregory III, who oversees the 1.6 million members of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan, Israel, Palestinian territories and Sudan, stated:

“Who created this hell in which our people have been living for months?… Every day, Islamic extremists from all over the world are pouring into Syria with the sole intent to kill and not one country has done anything to stop them…”

Gregory III concluded:

“For the last two and a half years, Eastern and Western countries have not stopped sending weapons, money, military experts, secret service agents and Salafist fundamentalist armed gangs of thugs and criminals, who have fallen on Syria like a destructive new flood.”

Between 2011-2014, the U.S. pulled troops out of Iraq and Afghanistan which created a power vacuum.

The U.S. then released, in exchange for Army defector Sgt. Bowe Berghdahl, five senior Afghan Taliban commanders.

These Muslim leaders, according to a 2008 Pentagon dossier, are capable not only of leading attacks in the Middle East but also in America: Mullah Mohammad Fazl, Mullah Norullah Noori, Abdul Haq Wasiq, Khairullah Khairkhwa and Mohammed Nabi Omari.

After the U.S. supplied arms to fundamentalist Muslim fighters to overthrow Gaddafi in Lybia, the U.S. supplied and trained Muslim fighters to overthrow Assad in Syria. These fighters, referred to as ISIS, killed, raped, and beheaded tens of thousands in Syria and Iraq.

They gave Christian and Yazidis minorities the choice: convert to Islam, be killed, pay the exorbitant jizyah tax, or flee, as hundreds of thousands did.

They destroyed Christian churches in Syria and Iraq, such as the ancient 1,800 year old church in Mosul.

Patriarch Louis Sako stated:

“For the first time in the history of Iraq, Mosul is now empty of Christians.”

Since 2012, nearly a quarter of million have been killed by ISIS as they have overrun Syria and Iraq.

German journalist Manuel Ochsenreiter was asked by RT.com on August 21, 2014, about the United States supporting ISIS through its allies:

“In order to fight against the Islamic State in a successful way the West needs to sanction and punish all those powers that are supporting the Islamic State, namely Turkey and the Gulf states (Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar) Ochsenreiter believes.

‘We have to see the Islamic State terrorists as a Western-created monster. The Islamic State would not exist without the fierce Western help and also the support by the Arabic Gulf States, as well as the support from Turkey…

Nobody was talking about helping Christians in the region.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.

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286 – Oct. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past



May our souls…thirst for such seasons of refreshing

October 13, 1778 – Elder Abel Morgan delivered the opening message to the Philadelphia Association at Hopewell, New Jersey from Mt 22:4: Again, he sent forth other servants, saying, Tell them which are bidden, Behold, I have prepared my dinner: my oxen and my fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come unto the marriage. His sermon reflected the spirit of urgency that the entire association felt.

The young nation was engaged in war with a formidable enemy, and things did not look good at all for the Continental Army. Their minutes record their concern: “The Association, deeply impressed with a sense of the calamities of the times, the prevalence of vice and profanity, and the declension of vital piety: Resolved, To recommend to the churches to observe four days, the ensuing year, of humiliation, fasting and prayer, and abstinence from labor and recreation; viz, the second Thursday in November, February, May and August; and they entreat the same day religiously observed in a solemn and devout manner.”

Current Christianity equates the matter of fasting to monastic living or to an act of religiosity. However, our forefathers experienced revival, and the nation enjoyed any number of spiritual awakenings. May our souls hunger and thirst for such seasons of refreshing: and may our spiritual leadership call the people apart and sanctify definite days of humiliation (repentance), fasting, and prayer. Our changeless God has promised to answer such intensity of heart. “Wilt thou not revive us again: that thy people may rejoice in thee? Ps. 85:6.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 424-25.

The post 286 – Oct. 13 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

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A “Talk” to the Cherokee Nation August 29, 1796

George Washington and IndiansAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

In 1754, Colonel George Washington built Fort Necessity on Great Meadows, after a successful attack on the French in May.

While encamped at Great Meadows, he received a letter from his brother Lawrence’s father-in-law, Mr. William Fairfax:

“I will not doubt your having public prayers in the camp, especially when the Indian families are your guests, that they, seeing your plain manner of worship, may have their curiosity excited to be informed why we do not use the ceremonies of the French,

which being well explained to their understandings, will more and more dispose them to receive our baptism, and unite in strict bonds of cordial friendship.”

On May 12, 1779, General George Washington was visited at his Middle Brook military encampment by the Chiefs of the Delaware Indian tribe.

They had brought three youths to be trained in the American schools. Washington assured them:

“Brothers: I am glad you have brought three of the Children of your principal Chiefs to be educated with us. I am sure Congress will open the Arms of love to them, and will look upon them as their own Children, and will have them educated accordingly.

This is a great mark of your confidence and of your desire to preserve the friendship between the Two Nations to the end of time, and to become One people with your Brethren of the United States….”

Washington continued:

“You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ. These will make you a greater and happier people than you are.

Congress will do everything they can to assist you in this wise intention; and to tie the knot of friendship and union so fast, that nothing shall ever be able to loose it…

And I pray God He may make your Nation wise and strong.”

After George Washington retired from being General of the Continental Army, he wrote from Mount Vernon to the President of the Continental Congress, February 8, 1785:

“Toward the latter part of the year 1783, I was honored with a letter from the Countess of Huntington, briefly reciting her benevolent intention of spreading Christianity among the Tribes of Indians inhabiting our Western Territory;

and expressing a desire of my advice and assistance to carry this charitable design into execution.

I wrote her Ladyship…that I would give every aid in my power, consistent with the ease and tranquility, to which I meant to devote the remainder of my life, to carry her plan into effect…

Her Ladyship has spoken so feelingly and sensibly, on the religious and benevolent purposes of the plan, that no language of which I am possessed, can add aught to enforce her observations.”

President Washington addressed Congress, November 6, 1792:

“Laws will expire during the present session. Among these, that which regulates trade…with the Indian tribes…

Your common deliberations…will, I trust, be productive…to our constituents…by conciliating more and more their ultimate suffrage…and confirm their attachment to that Constitution…upon which, under Divine Providence, materially depend…their happiness.”

On AUGUST 29, 1796, from the city of Philadelphia, President George Washington dictated a “Talk” to the Cherokee Nation:

“Beloved Cherokees: The wise men of the United States meet once a year, to consider what will be for the good of all their people…

I have thought that a meeting of your wise men once or twice a year would be alike useful to you…

I now send my best wishes to the Cherokees, and pray the Great Spirit to preserve them.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s books here.


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Alexis de Tocqueville on America

Alexis de Tocqueville

American Minute with Bill Federer

Alexis de Tocqueville was born JULY 29, 1805.

A French social scientist, he traveled the United States in 1831, and wrote a two-part work, Democracy in America (1835, 1840), which has been described as:

“the most comprehensive and penetrating analysis of the relationship between character and society in America that has ever been written.”

In it, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Upon my arrival in the United States the religious aspect of the country was the first thing that struck my attention; and the longer I stayed there, the more I perceived the great political consequences resulting from this new state of things, to which I was unaccustomed.

In France I had almost always seen the spirit of religion and the spirit of freedom marching in opposite directions. But in America I found they were intimately united and that they reigned in common over the same country…”

De Tocqueville continued:

“They brought with them…a form of Christianity, which I cannot better describe, than by styling it a democratic and republican religion…

From the earliest settlement of the emigrants, politics and religion contracted an alliance which has never been dissolved.”

De Tocqueville wrote:

“Religion in America…must be regarded as the foremost of the political institutions of that country; for if it does not impart a taste for freedom, it facilitates the use of it…This opinion is not peculiar to a class of citizens or a party, but it belongs to the whole nation.”

De Tocqueville observed:

“The sects that exist in the United States are innumerable. They all differ in respect to the worship which is due to the Creator; but they all agree in respect to the duties which are due from man to man. Each sect adores the Deity in its own peculiar manner, but all sects preach the same moral law in the name of God…

Moreover, all the sects of the United States are comprised within the great unity of Christianity, and Christian morality is everywhere the same.”

De Tocqueville added:

“In the United States the sovereign authority is religious…There is no country in the whole world where the Christian religion retains a greater influence than in America…

America is still the place where the Christian religion has kept the greatest real power over men’s souls; and nothing better demonstrates how useful and natural it is to man, since the country where it now has the widest sway is both the most enlightened and the freest.”

De Tocqueville continued:

“In the United States the influence of religion is not confined to the manners, but it extends to the intelligence of the people…Christianity, therefore reigns without obstacle, by universal consent…”

De Tocqueville continued:

“The Americans combine the notions of Christianity and of liberty so intimately in their minds, that it is impossible to make them conceive the one without the other; and with them this conviction does not spring from that barren traditionary faith which seems to vegetate in the soul rather than to live.”

In Book Two of Democracy in America, de Tocqueville wrote:

“Christianity has therefore retained a strong hold on the public mind in America…In the United States…Christianity itself is a fact so irresistibly established, that no one undertakes either to attack or to defend it.”

In August of 1831, while traveling through Chester County, New York, Alexis de Tocqueville observed a court case:

“While I was in America, a witness, who happened to be called at the assizes of the county of Chester, declared that he did not believe in the existence of God or in the immortality of the soul. The judge refused to admit his evidence, on the ground that the witness had destroyed beforehand all confidence of the court in what he was about to say. The newspapers related the fact without any further comment.

The New York Spectator of August 23d, 1831, relates the fact in the following terms:

‘The court of common pleas of Chester county (New York), a few days since rejected a witness who declared his disbelief in the existence of God.

The presiding judge remarked, that he had not before been aware that there was a man living who did not believe in the existence of God; that this belief constituted the sanction of all testimony in a court of justice: and that he knew of no case in a Christian country, where a witness had been permitted to testify without such belief.’”

In Democracy in American, Vol. II, (1840), Book 1, Chapter V), Alexis de Tocqueville wrote:

“Mohammed brought down from heaven and put into the Koran not religious doctrines only, but political maxims, criminal and civil laws, and scientific theories.

The Gospels, on the other hand, deal only with the general relations between man and God and between man and man. Beyond that, they teach nothing and do not oblidge people to believe anything.

That alone, among a thousand reasons, is enough to show that Islam will not be able to hold its power long in an age of enlightenment and democracy, while Christianity is destined to reign in such age, as in all others.”

Alexis de Tocqueville wrote to Arthur de Gobineau, October 22, 1843 (Tocqueville Reader, p. 229):

“I studied the Koran a great deal. I came away from that study with the conviction there have been few religions in the world as deadly to men as that of Mohammed.

So far as I can see, it is the principle cause of the decadence so visible today in the Muslim world and, though less absurd than the polytheism of old, its social and political tendencies are in my opinion to be feared, and I therefore regard it as a form of decadence rather than a form of progress in relation to paganism itself.”

Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal contributing editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Persecution Is Normal

Persecution Is Normal

2 Timothy 3:12

“Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution,” 2 Timothy 3:12.


A promise that Christians can count on is this, “Live godly . . . suffer persecution” (verse 12). This promise makes one wonder, where’s the incentive to be good? The Christian, working hard to be good, changes Christianity into just another religion. On the other hand, if we are surrendering our body to God as a tool with which He can do good works, then, it is Christ’s righteousness, God working out through us. That makes Christianity a lifestyle which Satan and his advocates disdain (Matt. 5: 10-12).

People living godly are lights that expose those who are walking in darkness and causes them great discomfort. “Ye are all the children of light, and the children of the day: we are not of the night, nor of darkness” (1 Thess. 5:5). Normal means “a common event that usually occurs.” Persecution is normal for the Christian. Peter taught that, if we do well and are persecuted for it, great is our reward.

I once heard David Ring, an evangelist who has muscular sclerosis. It was difficult to understand his speech as he told of the many accomplishments with which God had blessed him. Someone told him he was not normal. He replied, “Normal! What’s normal! I’ve got muscular sclerosis, and I did all these wonderful things. What’s your problem!” Christianity is like a hard working Helen Keller amidst a group of judgmental finger-pointers.




I’ve got muscular sclerosis! What’s your problem? I’m a Christian doing the best I can, and God has blessed me. What’s your problem?—David Ring

Robert Brock

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