Tag Archives: Brazil

107– April 17 – This Day in Baptist History


German U-Boat Sinks the Zam Zam – 144 missionaries on board
Florence Almen had gone from America in 1936 and had served for a term in French Equatorial Africa. After returning to her homeland for a year of furlough. Florence said her farewells to family and friends and boarded the Zam Zam on March 21, 1941, for her return to her labors.  The ship carried 201 passengers, including 144 missionaries.   They made their way to Baltimore and picked up additional crew and then continued on to Brazil. Leaving Brazil for Cape Town on April 9, they traveled without lights and maintained radio silence, for the German U-boats were very active. All seemed to go well until April 17, just two days from the arrival in Cape Town. A terrible vibration rocked the ship, and the screaming crash of shells awakened passengers and crew. The old ship was under attack.
They found that their lifeboat had been hit, but they finally discovered another.  As the lifeboat pulled away from the listing Zam, they found that it, too, had been riddled with gun fire and was filling with water. Florence Almen did not know how to swim, but heroically to lighten the load, she jumped overboard. As she did so, she cried out to the Lord, “I’ll be seeing your face today, Lord Jesus.” She further testified, “I wasn’t alone. God was there. Underneath were the everlasting arms. I felt His Presence—really real.” In a short time, they heard a motor and discovered that the German captain of the raider (the Tamesis) had sent a launch to pick up those in the water.
Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 156-157
The post 107– April 17 – This Day in Baptist History appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

319 – Nov. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Baptists in Brazil persecuted but prevail

 

1889 – The Republic of Brazil was proclaimed and they adopted a constitution patterned after that of the U.S., and freedom of religion was included. However, in 1930 the nation fell under a dictatorship that lasted through the Second World War. Following the war, political pressures both in Brazil and around the world forced the leaders to adopt a democratic form of government, and a national election was held on Dec. 2, 1945. Several attempts to establish Protestantism had been made as early as the days of John Calvin. Under great pressure these were expelled in 1567. In time gospel preachers came with the Dutch colonists, and in 1810 German Lutherans were permitted to propagate their faith. There was an effort to reestablish the Roman Catholic Church as the state religion in 1925, but public opinion opposed such a move. In 1850 the Southern Baptists transferred Rev. T.J. Bowen from Yoruba, Africa to Brazil but their health demanded retirement from missionary service. Finally on Oct. 12, 1871, the Foreign Mission Board of Richmond sent missionaries to assist and on Jan. 13, 1881, Rev. and Mrs. W.B. Bagby sailed from Baltimore, and forty-eight days later anchored in the Bay of Rio as the first Baptist missionaries to that field. On March 4, 1882, Rev. and Mrs. Z.C. Taylor, the second couple, were sent. They experienced great blessings one of which was to meet a converted priest. Persecution came mainly from the Catholic Church. There were many arrests, throwing of stones, two criminal mobs shooting at each other while the preachers escaped, and many other escapades but the work still grew. [A.R Crabtree, Baptists in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro: Baptist Publishing House, 1953), pp. 79-80. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 624-26.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

The post 319 – Nov. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History

309 – Nov. 05 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Five of their children went as missionaries

 

1855 – William Bagby was born and later was saved under the preaching of Rufus C. Burleson, during the time that the pioneer preacher was President of Waco University in Texas. While there, William studied theology under Dr. B. H. Carroll, and graduated in 1875, and four years later was ordained into the gospel ministry. The following year he married Anne Ellen Luther, whose father was the president of Baylor College, and also the same year, applied for missionary service in Brazil. They sailed for the field from Baltimore in 1881 and never returned to their native land. William had served the Lord for fifty-eight years when he was called home from Porto Alegre in 1939, and Mrs. Bagby had served sixty-one years when she died in Recife in 1942. The Bagby’s had nine children. Four died, but the five remaining followed them in missionary service, four in Brazil and one in Argentina. The First Baptist Church for Brazilians was organized in 1882 in Salvador, in the state of Bahia. One of the first members was an ex-priest who had come to faith in Christ while reading his Catholic Bible, but until the Baptists came could find no one to immerse him. He taught them the language and they taught him the Word. He did much of the preaching in the Salvador church. Religious freedom was unknown at that time in Brazil and the early pioneer missionaries suffered all kinds of persecution and opposition. Some were imprisoned, others were subjected to bodily injury. This persisted until Nov. 15, 1889 when the country became a Republic and the Roman Catholic Church was disestablishment and Religious freedom was proclaimed. [Frank K. Means, Advance: A History of Southern Baptist Foreign Missions (Nashville: Broadman Press, 1970), pp.242-43. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 604-05.]  Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

The post 309 – Nov. 05 – This Day in Baptist History Past appeared first on The Trumpet Online.

 

 

 

1 Comment

Filed under Church History