Tag Archives: baptist missionaries

127– May 06 – This Day in Baptist History Past


A Preacher, a Missionary and a Soldier
Philadelphia saved from the plague

One cannot peruse the minutes of the Philadelphia Baptist Association from 1707 to 1807 without often seeing the name David Jones. He was born May 12, 1736, and he experienced salvation and was baptized May 6, 1758, when he was just turning twenty-two years of age.
We gather from the records of an October meeting in 1772 that the early Baptist missionaries were thrust out by the Holy Spirit and provided for by the local churches according to the New Testament pattern at Antioch.
David Jones wrote several circular letters to the churches making up the Philadelphia Association.  These letters revealed the prevailing spiritual condition and welfare of the churches and country. Days of fasting and prayer were often requested. Jones in writing the letter in 1798 mentioned,
We have been once more prevented assembling in the City of Philadelphia by a dreadful visitation from God.           Whatever may be the natural cause of this complaint, no doubt SIN is the procuring cause; nor can we reasonably     expect a removal of the calamity without a suitable reformation among the inhabitants, for which we ought fervently to pray to God; and who knoweth but He may in His great mercy, graciously answer our supplications.
The minutes of 1800 record that the association met in Philadelphia. The eleventh entry states, “Conscious that the interposing Providence of God hath preserved the City of Philadelphia, during the present season, from the malignant fever, and caused the earth to bring forth her fruits more abundantly than for some years past, the Association set apart, and recommend, Thursday the 13th of November next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving by all the churches in our connection.”

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 184-185
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354 – Dec. 20 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Eleven Baptists martyred for Christ

1943 – Eleven Baptist missionaries suffered martyrdom at the hands of the Japanese on the Island of Panay in the Philippines during World War II. As the Japanese troops approached, all Americans fled to the mountains. Businessmen, miners, their families, and the missionaries fled as best they could. The eleven included – Dr. and Mrs. Frederick W. (Ruth) Meyer, Miss Jennie Adams, James Howard and Charma Covell, Erle F. and Louise Rounds and son Earl Douglas Rounds, Francis H. and Gertrude Rose, Miss Signe Erickson and Miss Dorothy Dowell. The group was initially successful in their effort, and a letter from Mr. Covell arrived at the mission board office in March 1944 having come through a circuitous route. The letter had been written on May 16, 1943, and was addressed from “Hopevale,” the name they had given their hideaway. The Provost Marshal General’s office in Washington gave a brief report on the Covell’s death on March 20, 1944, however final confirmation was received from Mr. Engracio C. Alora, the General Secretary of the Convention of Philippine Baptist Churches, in a letter dated April 11, 1945, in which it was officially stated that all eleven missionaries had been slaughtered on December 20, 1943, though captured on the 19th. The local Baptist pastor had gotten to the camp as soon as it was safe, and had interred the bodies. The missionaries were told that they were under the death warrant. They asked if they might first have time to pray, and an hour was spent before the throne of grace. They then stood and declared that they were ready, and the shade drops on this awful crime.
[This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 694-96. Jesse R. Wilson, Through Shining Archay(Valley Forge, Pa.: Board of International Ministers of the American Baptist Churches, 1949), p.5.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

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319 – Nov. 15 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Baptists in Brazil persecuted but prevail

 

1889 – The Republic of Brazil was proclaimed and they adopted a constitution patterned after that of the U.S., and freedom of religion was included. However, in 1930 the nation fell under a dictatorship that lasted through the Second World War. Following the war, political pressures both in Brazil and around the world forced the leaders to adopt a democratic form of government, and a national election was held on Dec. 2, 1945. Several attempts to establish Protestantism had been made as early as the days of John Calvin. Under great pressure these were expelled in 1567. In time gospel preachers came with the Dutch colonists, and in 1810 German Lutherans were permitted to propagate their faith. There was an effort to reestablish the Roman Catholic Church as the state religion in 1925, but public opinion opposed such a move. In 1850 the Southern Baptists transferred Rev. T.J. Bowen from Yoruba, Africa to Brazil but their health demanded retirement from missionary service. Finally on Oct. 12, 1871, the Foreign Mission Board of Richmond sent missionaries to assist and on Jan. 13, 1881, Rev. and Mrs. W.B. Bagby sailed from Baltimore, and forty-eight days later anchored in the Bay of Rio as the first Baptist missionaries to that field. On March 4, 1882, Rev. and Mrs. Z.C. Taylor, the second couple, were sent. They experienced great blessings one of which was to meet a converted priest. Persecution came mainly from the Catholic Church. There were many arrests, throwing of stones, two criminal mobs shooting at each other while the preachers escaped, and many other escapades but the work still grew. [A.R Crabtree, Baptists in Brazil (Rio de Janeiro: Baptist Publishing House, 1953), pp. 79-80. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 624-26.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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289 – Oct. 16 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Wm. Ward

 

Other missionaries followed him

 

1798 – William Ward was appointed to serve as a printer, along with William Carey in India. Dr. Carey had translated the Bible into many languages in the area, and now was interested in a Javanese New Testament when he invited Gottlob Bruckner, a German, to come to India. Rev. Bruckner, with his two sons, made the journey in 1828. Little did he know that he would return to his wife three years later with only one son, having buried the other with a tropical fever. When the task was completed the missionary and his son boarded the ship with 2,000 Javanese Testaments, twenty thousand tracts, and a set of type faces with Javanese letters. Their ship was almost sunk in a typhoon, then arriving home soldiers seized all but a few of the Testaments, but he would not quit. Gottlob was born in 1783 on a farm in Germany. At age 20 he went to Berlin to seek his fortune and heard a gospel preacher and was saved. Through incredible trials he finally reached Semarang, Java in 1814 and became the pastor of a Dutch church and married his wife. While there Rev. and Mrs. Thomas Trowt, Baptist missionaries from England arrived, and they became great friends. It was Trowt that convinced Bruckner of believer’s baptism and when he immersed him the church folks turned him out of his pulpit. It was only six months later that Trowt died of a tropical fever. Bruckner died in 1857 and saw few direct results from his preaching, but other Christian missionaries followed him, and today there are more professing believers in Java than any place on earth where Islam is the strong majority religion. [S. Pearce Carey, William Carey (London: Hodder and Stoughton Limited, 1924), pp. 177, 410. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 566-68.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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215 – August 03 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

First Missionaries from North Carolina

 

1846 – Matthew and Eliza Yates were appointed as missionaries to China by the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention.  They were the first missionaries to go to the foreign field from North Carolina.  Yates died on March 17, 1888 and was buried in China after a blessed and fruitful ministry.  (Walter Sinclair Stewart, Early Baptist Missionaries and Pioneers – Philadelphia: Judson Press, 1926. 2:176)

 

Prepared by Dr. Greg Dixon

 

 

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126 – May 06 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

A Preacher, a Missionary and a Soldier

 

Philadelphia saved from the plague

 

One cannot peruse the minutes of the Philadelphia Baptist Association from 1707 to 1807 without often seeing the name David Jones. He was born May 12, 1736, and he experienced salvation and was baptized May 6, 1758, when he was just turning twenty-two years of age. We gather from the records of an October meeting in 1772 that the early Baptist missionaries were thrust out by the Holy Spirit and provided for by the local churches according to the New Testament pattern at Antioch.  David Jones wrote several circular letters to the churches making up the Philadelphia Association.  These letters revealed the prevailing spiritual condition and welfare of the churches and country. Days of fasting and prayer were often requested. Jones in writing the letter in 1798 mentioned, ”We have been once more prevented assembling in the City of Philadelphia by a dreadful visitation from God.   Whatever may be the natural cause of this complaint, no doubt SIN is the procuring cause; nor can we reasonably expect a removal of the calamity without a suitable reformation among the inhabitants, for which we ought fervently to pray to God; and who knoweth but He may in His great mercy, graciously answer our supplications.”     The minutes of 1800 record that the association met in Philadelphia. The eleventh entry states, “Conscious that the intereposing Providence of God hath preserved the City of Philadelphia, during the present season, from the malignant fever, and caused the earth to bring forth her fruits more abundantly than for some years past, the Association set apart, and recommend, Thursday the 13th of November next, to be observed as a day of thanksgiving by all the churches in our connection.”

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 184-185

 

 

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