Tag Archives: baptised

221 – August, 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Gano and Washington

He immersed George Washington

John Gano departed this life at his home near Frankfort, Kentucky, on August 9, 1804. He had sustained injuries from a fall from his horse, but after suffering from a paralytic stroke, had recovered enough to be a part of the “Great Revival”, and preached a masterly discourse on the deity of Christ in defense of the truth against Arianism in 1803. Gano had a long and varied ministry. He had pastored churches in Philadelphia and N.Y. City, served as one of the Regents of N.Y. University, as a Revolutionary War chaplain and a wilderness preacher. Being an ardent patriot, he threw in his lot with the colonists and served as chaplain to General Clinton’s N.Y. Brigade. He was under fire at White Plains and displayed a cool and quiet courage which commanded the admiration of both men and officers at Chatterlou’s Hill when he found himself in the forefront of the fight. He served with distinction at Ft. Clinton and in the Western Campaign of 1779 against the Indians. Although there is no documented evidence, three of Gano’s children testified that at the close of the war their father had baptized George Washington in the Hudson River. Washington is quoted as saying, “I have been investigating the scripture, and I believe immersion  to be the baptism taught in the Word of God, and I demand it at your hands. I do not wish any parade made or the army called out, but simply a quiet demonstration of the ordinance.” Daniel Gano, one of Gano’s sons and a captain of the artillery, was present and said that he, with about forty officers and men, accompanied the chaplain down to the Hudson River where the Rev. John Gano baptized Washington.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 327-28.

He immersed George Washington

John Gano departed this life at his home near Frankfort, Kentucky, on August 9, 1804. He had sustained injuries from a fall from his horse, but after suffering from a paralytic stroke, had recovered enough to be a part of the “Great Revival”, and preached a masterly discourse on the deity of Christ in defense of the truth against Arianism in 1803. Gano had a long and varied ministry. He had pastored churches in Philadelphia and N.Y. City, served as one of the Regents of N.Y. University, as a Revolutionary War chaplain and a wilderness preacher. Being an ardent patriot, he threw in his lot with the colonists and served as chaplain to General Clinton’s N.Y. Brigade. He was under fire at White Plains and displayed a cool and quiet courage which commanded the admiration of both men and officers at Chatterlou’s Hill when he found himself in the forefront of the fight. He served with distinction at Ft. Clinton and in the Western Campaign of 1779 against the Indians. Although there is no documented evidence, three of Gano’s children testified that at the close of the war their father had baptized George Washington in the Hudson River. Washington is quoted as saying, “I have been investigating the scripture, and I believe immersion  to be the baptism taught in the Word of God, and I demand it at your hands. I do not wish any parade made or the army called out, but simply a quiet demonstration of the ordinance.” Daniel Gano, one of Gano’s sons and a captain of the artillery, was present and said that he, with about forty officers and men, accompanied the chaplain down to the Hudson River where the Rev. John Gano baptized Washington.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins/Thompson, pp. 327-28.

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294 – Oct. 21 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Persecution before Communism in Russia

 

 

 1870 – Vasilia Ivanhoff, was baptized in the Fiflis River, following his conversion to Christ, having been born under the government of Elizabethpol, Russia in 1848. He is one of the prime examples that persecution in Russia against the Gospel of Christ, and especially against Baptists, was in full effect even before the Communist revolution of 1917. Soon after he was saved, Vasilia was called to preach the gospel, and from that time he began to experience severe persecution. As he traveled without a passport, which was denied, he was arrested, tried and exiled. In 1895 he again was arrested and served in Siberia for four years as a beast of burden, chained to fifteen other men and made to grind corn on a treadmill. Under his ministry a Baptist church was established at Baku, his home town, which soon consisted of three hundred members. His testimony at sixty-three was that his persecution began at age twenty-two when he became a Baptist. He said, “Since that time most of my life has been spent in prison and exile.” He said that he had seen the inside of thirty-one different prisons. “…I have baptized over fifteen hundred men and women, most of them at night in some lonely place away from the eyes of the police. Often I have chopped through the ice in order to administer baptism. Once I baptized a group of eighty-six persons.”  Vasilia, and others like him, are the forebears of the unregistered Baptist church movement in Russia that survived the Communist era that still exists today. [J.N. Prestridge, Modern Baptist Heroes and Martyrs (Louisville, Ky.: World Press, 1911), pp. 23-24. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 576-77.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

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127—May 07 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Small-Town Preacher with a Worldwide Vision

 

Gloomy and fatalistic high Calvinism held sway in the pulpits of England when Andrew Fuller was born in Wicken, Cambridgeshire, England, Feb. 6, l754. When about fourteen years of age he first became the subject of religious exercises. This question arose in his mind, What is faith? He could not answer it, but he satisfied himself that it did not require an immediate response, and that he would learn in the future what it was. Nevertheless he was not as indifferent about his soul as in former times, and occasionally he was very unhappy. Once, with some boys in a blacksmith’s shop, while they were singing foolish songs, the words addressed to Elijah seemed to pierce his soul, — What doest thou here, Elijah? And he arose and left his companions. It was then in 1769, Andrew Fuller became a genuine believer in Christ. He was baptized and joined the church in Soham where his family attended. Fuller never received formal theological training, but his extraordinary gifting was apparent as he began preaching in the church at age 17.  He soon became pastor of a little Baptist church at Soham where he served until 1782. He then became the pastor of a vigorous church in Kettering, Northhamptonshire and remained there until his death.

 

Andrew Fuller’s deep concern for evangelism and world missions led to the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society on October 2, 1792. Fuller and a small assembly of pastors, including William Carey and John Thomas who later went to India joined together to form the society.

 

To recognize his contributions in theology, Princeton University awarded him a D.D. in 1798 and Yale did the same in 1805.  He declined both. Andrew Fuller contracted tuberculosis and passed away at age 61 on May 7, 1815.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 186 – 187

 

 

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88 – March 29 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


No Protection for Hypocrites

The events surrounding the ministry of Isaiah Wallace of New Brunswick, was published in the Christian Messenger on March 29, 1871.  Wallace was born in Hopewell, New Brunswick on Jan. 17, 1797, the first-born child of James and Catharine Wallace.  Early on he trusted the Lord Jesus as his savior, and was baptized by immersion.  As he reached maturity, God the Holy Spirit burdened him to preach, and he did so as the opportunity presented itself.  He served as a pastor, agent for the Baptist College at Acadia, and an evangelist.  Everywhere he ministered he experienced the hand of the Lord upon him, and the Baptist work greatly expanded throughout both Nova Scotia and New Brunswick.  How we need to pray that God will once again awaken that beautiful but spiritually destitute portion of North America.  Often in his evangelistic crusades, Bro. Wallace would preach three times a day, baptize converts, serve communion and move on to another area to do the same thing, crossing bodies of water in cold weather and often walking for many miles.  Many times multitudes were saved in his evangelistic meetings.  At another time ministering in the northern portions of New Brunswick, he was able to establish the Campbellton Baptist Church.  A lady of high social standing requested baptism.  She had belonged to another communion and her friends discouraged her on the basis that she would surely endanger her health by going into the cold water.  Her husband asked Rev. Wallace if he knew of any that he had baptized, taking cold, and Wallace, said, “No.”  He then asked him if he had ever heard of anyone taking cold and Wallace said that T.S. Harding told him that out of a 1,000 converts that only one had caught a cold and that she was a hypocrite.  The man said, “My wife is no hypocrite.”  So he allowed her to be baptized without incident.  Let us pray that Nova Scotia and New Brunswick will once again know the power of God.

 

Dr. Greg J. Dixon, adapted from: This Day in Baptist History III (David L. Cummins), pp.182-184.

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322 – Nov. 18 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“…as a young man… William became convinced of believer’s immersion…”

November 18, 1826 – William Cathcart, was born to James and Elizabeth Cathcart in Londonberry County, Ireland. He was raised in the Presbyterian Church and was converted at an early age. However, as a young man of nineteen, William became convinced of believer’s immersion and was baptized in January of 1846 by Rev. R.H. Carson of Tubbermore. As a young man William was impressed by the Lord that he was a chosen vessel to preach the gospel. He received his training at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and his theological studies in the Rawdon (Baptist) College in Yorkshire, England. Early in 1850 he was ordained as pastor in the Baptist church near Sheffield, England, and that same year married Eliza Caldwell. For 3 years he served that church as pastor. The political ideas of the day and his strong aversion to the state church sentiments influenced him to emigrate to America. The Cathcarts arrived in America on Nov. 18, 1853. The next month he accepted the call to the Third Baptist Church of Groton, CT. He served there for four years until he was called to the Second Baptist Church of Philadelphia where he remained for 27 years. Cathcart was a man of staunch convictions and treasured the Baptist distinctives. He enjoyed history and began amassing biographies of Baptist preachers and compiling data. He became one of the greatest Baptist historians of all time. His The Baptists and the American Revolution published in 1876 is now a great classic. His two volume set, The Baptist Encyclopedia, which first appeared in 1881, is no doubt his greatest literary contribution. After retirement from the pastorate, the Lord allowed many additional years of active service. He passed into the presence of the Lord on July 8, 1908 at the age of eighty-one.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins /Thompson /, pp. 480-81.

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