Tag Archives: Andrew Fuller

128—May 07 – This Day in Baptist History Past


Andrew Fuller

Small-Town Preacher with a Worldwide Vision

Gloomy and fatalistic high Calvinism held sway in the pulpits of England when Andrew Fuller was born in Wicken, Cambridgeshire, England, Feb. 6, l754. When about fourteen years of age he first became interested in religious exercises. This question arose in his mind, what is faith? He could not answer it, but he satisfied himself that it did not require an immediate response, and that he would learn in the future what it was. Nevertheless he was not as indifferent about his soul as in former times, and occasionally he was very unhappy. Once, with some boys in a blacksmith’s shop, while they were singing foolish songs, the words addressed to Elijah seemed to pierce his soul, — What doest thou here, Elijah? And he arose and left his companions. It was then in 1769, Andrew Fuller became a genuine believer in Christ. He was baptized and joined the church in Soham where his family attended. Fuller never received formal theological training, but his extraordinary gifting was apparent as he began preaching in the church at age 17.  He soon became pastor of a little Baptist church at Soham where he served until 1782. He then became the pastor of a vigorous church in Kettering, Northhamptonshire and remained there until his death.
Andrew Fuller’s deep concern for evangelism and world missions led to the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society on October 2, 1792. Fuller and a small assembly of pastors, including William Carey and John Thomas who later went to India joined together to form the society.
To recognize his contributions in theology, Princeton University awarded him a D.D. in 1798 and Yale did the same in 1805.  He declined both. Andrew Fuller contracted tuberculosis and passed away at age 61 on May 7, 1815.

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 186 – 187
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275 – Oct. 02 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

They “Held the Rope”

 

1792 – Is a day that should live forever in the hearts of Bible believing Baptists, for it was on that day that the first modern-day mission agency was founded. William Carey, Andrew Fuller, and a small group of Baptist pastors from the Northhamptonshire Baptist Association in Great Britain formed the Baptist Missionary Society, or the B.M.S. for short. Dr. John Collett Ryland, Jr. was to become the driving force behind the eventual success of the B.M.S. He was the son of Rev. John C. Ryland, Sr. and was born in 1753 in Warwick and educated in his father’s school. He served for fifteen years as his fathers assistant at the College Lane Church, Northhampton, before succeeding him as pastor of that Baptist congregation in 1786. It was while assistant to his father that he baptized William Carey in the River Nen on Oct. 5, 1783. His diary entry said, “I baptized a poor journeyman cobbler.” In 1792 he became pastor of Broadmead Baptist in Bristol and principal of Bristol Baptist College where many men were trained for the ministry and missions. He followed Fuller as the Secretary of the B.M.S. and traveled extensively and preached nearly 9,000 sermons, much of it for the cause of missions. Twenty-six of his students went on to the mission field. Carey had challenged Ryland, Sutcliff, Fuller, and Pearce to “hold the rope” while he went into the mine of India. They didn’t disappoint him. Dr. Ryland died in 1825 at 72 years of age. [Norman S. Moon, Education for Ministry-Bristol Baptist College 1679-1979 (Rushden, Norrthhamptonshire: Stanley L. Hunt, Ltd. 1979), p. 113. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. 539-40.]
Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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127—May 07 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

Small-Town Preacher with a Worldwide Vision

 

Gloomy and fatalistic high Calvinism held sway in the pulpits of England when Andrew Fuller was born in Wicken, Cambridgeshire, England, Feb. 6, l754. When about fourteen years of age he first became the subject of religious exercises. This question arose in his mind, What is faith? He could not answer it, but he satisfied himself that it did not require an immediate response, and that he would learn in the future what it was. Nevertheless he was not as indifferent about his soul as in former times, and occasionally he was very unhappy. Once, with some boys in a blacksmith’s shop, while they were singing foolish songs, the words addressed to Elijah seemed to pierce his soul, — What doest thou here, Elijah? And he arose and left his companions. It was then in 1769, Andrew Fuller became a genuine believer in Christ. He was baptized and joined the church in Soham where his family attended. Fuller never received formal theological training, but his extraordinary gifting was apparent as he began preaching in the church at age 17.  He soon became pastor of a little Baptist church at Soham where he served until 1782. He then became the pastor of a vigorous church in Kettering, Northhamptonshire and remained there until his death.

 

Andrew Fuller’s deep concern for evangelism and world missions led to the formation of the Baptist Missionary Society on October 2, 1792. Fuller and a small assembly of pastors, including William Carey and John Thomas who later went to India joined together to form the society.

 

To recognize his contributions in theology, Princeton University awarded him a D.D. in 1798 and Yale did the same in 1805.  He declined both. Andrew Fuller contracted tuberculosis and passed away at age 61 on May 7, 1815.

 

Dr. Dale R. Hart: Adapted from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. I: Cummins Thompson /, pp. 186 – 187

 

 

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21 – Jan. 21 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


They had no other ambition but the glory of God.
 On Jan. 21, 1788, one of the most, humble, yet historically significant events took place in the study of the College Lane Baptist Church in Northamptonshire, England that this old world ever know.  Four Baptist ministers met together for a day of prayer and fasting.  Neither of these four men knew that each, in years to come, would be memorialized in the history of the Christian world as well as the Baptists.  They simply met as four friends who shared a longing for greater personal godliness, holiness in their churches, and the evangelism of the world.  They had no other ambition but the glory of God.  They were none other than John Ryland, Jr. John Sutcliff, Andrew Fuller, and William Carey.  In that room were the founders of the modern missionary movement.  Ryland recorded the holy event.  “… read the Epistles to Timothy and Titus; Abraham Booth’s charge to Thomas Hopkins; Richard Blackerby’s Life, in John Gillies; and John Rogers of Dedham’s sixty memorials for a Godly life: and each prayed twice.  Carey [prayed], with singular enlargement and pungency.  Our chief design was to implore a revival of godlinesss in our souls, in our churches, and in the churches at large.”  God surpassed their expectation when He used them to start a missionary movement that continues to this very day.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 43-44.

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15 – Jan. 15 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“Baptists would have become a perfect dunghill in society.”
 On Jan. 15, 1833, the copy of the New Hampshire Confession of Faith was presented to the Board and approved with slight modifications.  In June of 1830, “the Baptist Convention of New Hampshire appointed a committee to prepare and present at the next annual sessions ‘such a Declaration of Faith and Practice, together with a Covenant, as may be thought agreeable and consistent with the views of all our churches in this state.”  Calvinistic Baptists in the NH area had been considerably modified after 1870.  They had followed after the Particular Baptists who believed that God would save the “elect” only.  Andrew Fuller and Thomas Collier, though Particular Baptists had given rebirth to the missionary movement that had sent William Carey and others, etc.  Fuller said: “had matters gone on but a few years the Baptists would have become a perfect dunghill in society.”  On the Freeness of Salvation, the confession states: “We believe that the blessings of salvation are made free to all by the gospel; that it is the duty of all to accept them by a cordial, penitent, and obedient faith; and nothing prevents the salvation of the greatest sinner on earth except his own inherent depravity and voluntary refusal to submit to the Lord Jesus Christ, which refusal will subject him to an aggravated condemnation.” Adding a premillennial clause, fundamental Baptist groups throughout America soon adopted the Confession.  In 1925 the Southern Baptist Convention adopted this Confession with slight modifications.  It is reflective of the theological position of the majority of Bible-believing Baptists in America today.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 30-32.

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04 – Jan. 04 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


His brilliance was revealed early
 William Staughton was born in Coventry, England, on Jan. 4, 1770.  His brilliance was revealed early when at the age of twelve he published poems in Goldsmith’s Animated Nature. He was saved early in life, and baptized by Rev. Samuel Pearce of Birmingham. In 1792 he graduated from Bristol Baptist College, and while a student attended the organizational meeting of the first modern-day missionary agency in the world.  Though still a youth, he sat in the company of men like William Carey and Andrew fuller.  He pastored briefly in Northampton, and then sailed to America in 1793.  Richard Furman requested that he serve as pastor of the Baptist church in Georgetown, S.C., where he remained briefly.  Ordained on June 17, 1797, he served two churches in New Jersey.  He assisted in founding a seminary and continued his studies.  From 1805 to 1823, he served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia and later the Sanson St. Baptist Church of that city.  During that period he also served as the principle of a Baptist Theological institution.  He also served as corresponding secretary of the American Baptist Board of foreign Missions.  In 1823 he was appointed the first President as first president of Columbian College in Washington in Washington, D.C.  He sent his library ahead in anticipation of the move but he never made it.  He became ill and passed into the presence of the Lord on Dec. 12, 1829.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins /, pp. 7-8.

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