Tag Archives: American Baptist Home Mission Society

268 – Sept. 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

They loved the Navajos

 Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Gorman were approved on Sept. 25, 1852, by the American Baptist Home Mission Society, to serve among the Navajos in New Mexico. That field had recently been opened by H.W. Read of Connecticut. Two additional couples had also recently gone to that field of service, including James Milton Shaw and his wife from New York. A letter from Bro. Gorman dated in 1876 relates many of the trying experiences from the time that they arrived in Laguna in 1852. They had a nine month delayed entrance into “the Pueblo” as promised by Capt. Henry L. Dodge. The priests (Catholic) had done everything possible to “rout” them from the village including suing them at law in Taos, which they won at great cost of time and money. At times they had a hard time finding enough to eat and were out of funds most of the time. Thankfully when Capt. Dodge did come he persuaded the Indians to allow them to teach their children and to preach Christ to them. He was able to preach every Sabbath except when on mission tours and finally in 1858 he was able to build a little chapel. The first Indian convert in N.M. was Jose Senon who carried on the work when the missionaries had to leave when the area was occupied by the Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Gorman died at 92 after he also pastored successful churches in Ohio and Wisconsin. [Lewis A. Myers, A History of N.M. Baptists (Baptist Convention of New Mexico, 1995), pp. 59-60.

Dr. Greg J. Dixon: From: This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson,   pp. 525-27.

 

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313 – Nov. 09 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

We need submission to His commission

 

1844 – Dr. Jonathan Going went home to be with the Lord. Dr. Going, along with Rev. John Mason Peck founded the American Baptist Home Mission Society in 1832, whose goal was to promote the preaching of the gospel in North America. Going served as the corresponding secretary of the mission from 1832 to 1837. In 1838 he assumed the position of President of Granville College in Ohio. Jonathan was born to Jonathan and Sarah Going of Reading, Vermont, on March 7, 1786. He entered Brown University in 1805. As a student there he fell under deep conviction over his sins and received the Lord Jesus Christ as his Savior and was licensed to preach by the First Baptist Church of Providence, Rhode Island, while Stephen Gano was the pastor. This was during the time that the missionary fires were first beginning to burn hot in America. William Carey had gone to India in 1793. The Judsons and Luther Rice along with other Congregational missionaries had left our shores in 1812. The Judsons and Rice were converted to Baptist views on the ship as they sailed for Burma, and then Rice returned to create the first Baptist mission agency in 1814. Going had returned to Vermont to pastor and then to Worcester, Mass. where he had great success before his health broke. He took a leave of absence and with Peck went on a buggy trip through Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri before returning with the burning desire to evangelize the west. Someone has said concerning the Lord’s command that “There is no such thing as foreign missions or home missions. The real concern is submission to His Great Commission. [William Cathcart, The Baptist Encyclopedia (Philadelphia: Louis H. Everts, 1881), 1:457. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 612-13.]   Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

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268 – Sept. 25 – This Day in Baptist History Past


 

They reached the Navajo

 

1852, Rev. and Mrs. Samuel Gorman were approved by the American Baptist Home Mission Society to serve among the Navajos in New Mexico. That field had recently been opened by H.W. Read of Connecticut. Two additional couples had also recently gone to that field of service, including James Milton Shaw and his wife from New York. A letter from Bro. Gorman dated in 1876 relates many of the trying experiences from the time that they arrived in Laguna in 1852. They had a nine month delayed entrance into “the Pueblo” as promised by Capt. Henry L. Dodge. The priests (Catholic) had done everything possible to “rout” them from the village including suing them at law in Taos, which they won at great cost of time and money. At times they had a hard time finding enough to eat and out of funds most of the time. Thankfully when Capt. Dodge did come he persuaded the Indians to allow them to teach their children and to preach Christ to them. He was able to preach every Sabbath except when on mission tours and finally in 1858 he was able to build a little chapel. The first Indian convert in N.M. was Jose Senon who carried on the work when the missionaries had to leave when the area was occupied by the Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Gorman died at 92 after he pastored successful churches in Ohio and Wisconsin. [Lewis A. Myers, A History of N.M. Baptists (Baptist Convention of New Mexico, 1995), pp. 59-60. This Day in Baptist History II: Cummins and Thompson, BJU Press: Greenville, S.C. 2000 A.D. pp. 525-27.] Prepared by Dr. Greg J. Dixon

 

 

 

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14 – Jan. 14 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


“The Bible is the only rule of faith and practice.”
 
On Jan. 14, 1864, the US War Dept. notified its military personnel: “You are hereby directed to place at the disposal of the American Baptist Home Mission Society all houses of worship belonging to Baptist churches in the South, in which a loyal minister does not now officiate.”  The Mission Board appointed J.W. Parker of Boston to oversee the work.  Soon he reported that about half of the Baptist meeting houses in the South had been abandoned, but in essence the War Dept. gave the Society to seize almost any Baptist building where a “a loyal minister “ was to be found.  Following the Civil war, the devastation was so great, that as civilians fled before advancing Union armies, they left everything behind – including scores of abandoned Baptist buildings.  Law and order was practically non-existent and anarchy and confusion reigned in some sections.  The American Baptist Home Mission Board noted that in almost every town there could be found a deserted Baptist meeting house that had been stripped of all that was movable and the buildings had been converted into hospitals, stables and storehouses.”  No doubt their intentions were noble, but this action violated the time honored position of Baptists that “The Bible is the only rule of faith and practice.”  Not only faith (belief or doctrine) but also practice (actions) must be insisted upon.  First, the existence of a Home Mission Board is extra-Biblical to begin with, and then for them to seize Baptist buildings in the South is nigh unto criminal, for whatever noble purpose.  And then to use the very War Department that caused the carnage in the first place is an act that should make Judas blush.  But Denominations always think they know best what is good for local churches and their people.
Dr. Greg J. Dixon from: This Day in Baptist History Vol. IIII: Cummins, pp. 28-30.

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