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David’s Charge to His Son, Solomon


David’s Charge to His Son, Solomon

I Kings 2:1-12

Key Verse: “Be thou strong therefore, and shew thyself a man; and keep the charge of the LORD Thy God,” I Kings 2:2, 3.

David was a man after God’s own heart. Very simply that did not mean that David was without sin. It meant that when he did sin, he turned to God for forgiveness. He knew that forgiveness began with God. David was a sinner and committed some heinous sins. He confessed those sins to God and received forgiveness.

Now comes the time that all men experience. Death. He wants to leave some advice to Solomon who will follow David as King of Israel. “Be thou strong.” A simple piece of advice. Strength is what is needed to live life to its fullest before a righteous God. There are many trials and tribulations in this life. Strong living does not mean that we will not mourn events, be broken hearted, or suffer grief and indecision in this life. It means we will lay all our cares upon the LORD and depend upon Him to restore us to the Joy of serving God and living a life of honor.

Notice the part of the passage that says, “and shew thy-self a man:”. David knows that the man was given responsibility to guide the household in a Godly manner. He wanted Solomon to take his place before God and fulfill his duties to his family and nation in an appropriate manner. That means to lead the nation in a Godly manner and to take the lead in the family in worship in the house of God and in family devotion. I am always happy to the man take the lead in service and worship in the church. He then is shewing himself a man.

Keep the charge of the LORD thy God.” The LORD has given us many instructions for life, living, and serving Him. To the lost, its repent and believe on my Son for everlasting life. For those that are save and heaven bound it is live a life that is an imitation of Jesus Christ while he walked this earth. We have some excellent pointers from the sermon on the Mount in Matthew chapter 5, 6, 7. Matthew 5:1-12 gives us how our relationship with God and our relationship with man should be. The rest is directions for our life and how we should live. This was given to the church. A charge to be faithful and tell others about a Saviour is a charge that each of us should keep.

Thought – “A wise man will hear and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain unto wise counsels” (Proverbs 1:5).

James Candler

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Wile E. Coyote Parenting


Great thoughts on raising children.

The Daddy Blitz

Wile E. Coyote is one of my favorite characters from Looney Tunes. Why? Because I can identify with him. When I parent, I am Wile E. Coyote.

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The Evidence of True Wisdom


Jas 3:13 Who is a wise man and endued with knowledge among you? let him shew out of a good conversation his works with meekness of wisdom.

14 But if ye have bitter envying and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth.

15 This wisdom descendeth not from above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish.

16 For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work.

17 But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.

18 And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace of them that make peace.

Key Verse: James 3:17 – “But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.

In these verses, James, guided by the Holy Spirit, gave us two contrasting types of wisdom. One is with bitterness, envy, dissension and selfishness. The other is pure, peaceable, gentle, approachable, merciful, fruitful, practices equality and is genuine. Is there any doubt where each one originated?

Earthy, sensual wisdom prompts us to feel superior, falsely important and causes us to think we are always right. People with this type of wisdom are difficult to live and work with. Nothing ever pleases them no will they sacrifice for others. Their wisdom is devilish.

On the other hand, wisdom from above will point away from self. Godly wisdom will cause our actions to be mindful of Christ, his love and sacrifice for us as well as others. Nothing, not even our feelings, will be more important than giving God the glory and telling the good news. It will blind our eyes to nationality, wealth or age and cause our Christian walk to be fruitful and genuine. Unbelievers will see Christian living as peaceable, gentle and merciful.

Thoughts: Live for Christ – practice godly wisdom.

Live for self – practice devilish wisdom.

Beverly Barnett

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GOD GIVE WISDOM TO THOSE WHO ASK


Jas 1:5 If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.
6 But let him ask in faith, nothing wavering. For he that wavereth is like a wave of the sea driven with the wind and tossed.
7 For let not that man think that he shall receive any thing of the Lord.

Notice how this admonition comes right after the thoughts in the previous verses about temptations and patience? These are real trials in our everyday walk in the faith once delivered unto the saints. James is giving us some practical insight about our testimony to others when pressed beyond measure.

We should see that wisdom is required to live this life as a life a victory in overcoming the many different temptations in this world. When we overcome the temptation with wisdom, we honor God and bring glory to His Son. This wisdom brings the patience to get through this life overcoming the temptations and thereby having the joy of overcoming. We could say that wisdom brings joy to the christian life by overcoming the temptations that so easily beset us.

Christians should live with joy as a constant companion. We experience death of loved ones, heartache of sick children, sorrow of a loved one that strays; but with the wisdom of God we have that precious joy the each trial and temptation in life we have gone through and overcome and been the christian example that brings glory to God and the best example to the world of our sustaining faith.

Pray to God and ask for that wisdom of His that is so uncommon today. God’s wisdom is above the wisdom of this world. This wisdom is not in every garden.

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THE SOURCE OF TRUE WISDOM


For the Lord giveth wisdom: out of his mouth cometh knowledge and understanding,” Proverbs 2:6

Our society hungers for knowledge. We go to great lengths to obtain it, but somehow we miss getting wisdom because true wisdom comes from God. He generously gives wisdom to those who seek it (like a child looking for a hidden gift).

God, who made Heaven and earth, created the stars, perfectly positioned the sun and the moon in the expansive heavens, took “the dust to the ground” (Gen. 2:7) and formed the first man, filled his lungs with the breath of life and made him a living soul, then anesthetized him without drugs, removed a rib without leaving a scar, formed woman so perfect that Adam called her the “mother of all living,” offered us common, ordinary , fallible people His wisdom.

However, some shun God’s wisdom for the knowledge of a college professor, who has a finite mind and a possible IQ of one hundred fifty and who might not be sure there is a God. Whoever possesses godly wisdom will reverently and worshipfully love and respect God.

Reflection: I totally agree with having a college education when possible, but I would rather take advice from a graduate of high school whose wisdom is from God than from a graduate of Harvard whose only wisdom is from books.

Beverly Barnett

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ANOTHER FOREMAN’S FABLE


ANOTHER FOREMAN’S FABLE

Parson to Person

William Andrew Dillard

The appearances and effects of sin in human life are myriad. In fact, Every bad thing in the universe of mankind is attributable directly or indirectly to sin. This is apparent in domestic disputes and their ultimate fruitions. Such is also the cause of unkind words and deeds directed toward brethren of the same faith and practice. (Biting and devouring is how the Bible puts it.)

Addressing this issue in another of his classes: Ministerial Practicalities, Dr. L. D. Foreman, former President of Missionary Baptist Seminary in Little Rock, Arkansas shared yet another of his well thought out and grounded fables for his students to seriously consider. He said, “Students, all of you have witnessed a big dog trotting down the street. The dog has a destination in mind and continues steadily toward it. However, as he progresses down the street, every little dog on the block will come out to bark at him. Now if the big dog is distracted enough to stop and bark back at every little dog that barks at him, he will never reach his destination. Consequently, he ignores the little dogs and their barking, and continues his journey.”

Foreman went on to make practical application which by this time had become obvious. Any devoted follower of Jesus will not be treated better that was Jesus in His ministry. He will be controversial on the basis of Bible convictions, and he will attract the attention of a number of “little dogs” who come out to bark. Like the literal big dog, the minister must know who he is, what he is about, and where he is going. With those things settled in place, it is very unwise to stop and bark back at those who cast objections, however frivolous those objections may be. The object is not to debate one another, but to serve the Master by carrying out his holy Will for your life.

Of course, it remains that there are those whose thrill of life, and apparent calling (not of God) is to object to everything, however holy, that may rub against their self-imposed comfort zone. Because this is true, one must determine early on to be on a mission, or to bark at everyone else who is.

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Top 20 Values to Teach Children


Excellent guide

The Daddy Blitz

Below is a list of values that my wife and I are constantly trying to instill in our children. This is not an exclusive list, and many overlap, but these are the top items on my parenting agenda (my wife may have others) as we shepherd our children.

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JESUS BRING WISDOM


KEY VERSE: “But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: that, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord,” I Corinthians 1:30, 31.

Two little boys debated whose father was smarter. Jon said his father was smarter because he discovered a medicine that stopped hair from falling out. Brad said his father was smarter because he discovered a medicine that caused hair to grow back. Both fathers were bald. This is about the amount of our earthly wisdom.

Jesus gives us heavenly wisdom that does not end when we die. God’s wisdom is Christ and Christ in us. We are given wisdom through Christ Jesus as the Holy Spirit tutors us in the love story of God. This story is so simple it confuses a genius but gives wisdom to an illiterate because he accepts it by faith. That message is this–God so loved the sinner that He sent His sinless Son to die in the sinner’s place.

REFLECTION: In Christ, one has His wisdom, righteousness, sanctification and redemption; so if one is outside Christ, what does that make him?

Beverly Barnett

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Science points to a Divine Creator


Science points to a Divine Creator

Creation of Adam by MichelangeloAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

“O, Almighty God, I am thinking Thy thoughts after Thee!” wrote astronomer Johannes Kepler, 1619, The Harmonies of the World.

Johannes Kepler was born DECEMBER 27, 1571.

An attack of smallpox when he was four years old left Johannes Kepler with crippled hands and poor eyesight.

Overcoming those handicaps, Kepler took up the study of science.

The person most responsible for advancing the scientific method was Sir Francis Bacon (1561-1626).

Sir Francis Bacon, who helped found the Royal Society of London, wrote:

“There are two books laid before us to study, to prevent our falling into error; first, the volume of Scriptures, which reveal the will of God; then the volume of the Creatures, which express His power.”

In his work, Essays: Of Goodness, Sir Francis Bacon wrote:

“There never was found, in any age of the world, either philosophy, or sect, or religion, or law, or discipline, which did so highly exalt the good of the community, and increase private and particular good as the holy Christian faith. Hence, it clearly appears that it was one and the same God that gave the Christian law to men, who gave the laws of nature to the creatures.”

In his treatise titled, Of Atheism, Sir Francis Bacon declared:

“A little philosophy inclineth man’s mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men’s minds about to religion.”

A contemporary of Johannes Kepler was Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), who made the first practical use of the telescope.

Galileo Galilei stated:

“I am inclined to think that the authority of Holy Scripture is intended to convince men of those truths which are necessary for their salvation, which, being far above man’s understanding, can not be made credible by any learning, or any other means than revelation by the Holy Spirit.”

Galileo’s work gave credence to the heliocentric theory of Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543), where the sun is the center of the solar system instead of the earth, as Ptolemy’s geocentric theory had previously taught.

Copernicus’ heliocentric theory was advanced by Johannes Kepler, who at age 23 had become a professor of astronomy.

Johannes Kepler discovered the laws governing planetary motion and pioneered the discipline of celestial mechanics, known as Kepler’s Laws, which aided Newton in his formulation of the theory of gravitation.

Kepler’s publishing of the ephemeris tables, necessary for plotting star movement, contributed to the theory of calculus.

In book five of The Harmonies of the World (1619), Kepler wrote:

“The die is cast; the book is written, to be read either now or by posterity, I care not which.

It may be well to wait a century for a reader, as God has waited six thousand years for an observer.”

In comparing celestial orbits of the planets with polyphonic harmonies in music, Kepler wrote in The Harmonies of the Worlds (1619):

“Holy Father, keep us safe in the concord of our love for one another, that we may be one just as Thou art with Thy Son, Our Lord, and with the Holy Ghost,

and just as through the sweetest bonds of harmonies Thou hast made all Thy works one,

and that from the bringing of Thy people into concord, the body of Thy Church may be built up in the Earth, as Thou didst erect the heavens themselves out of harmonies.”

In the conclusion of his treatise, The Harmonies of the Worlds (1619), Johannes Kepler wrote:

“I thank Thee, my Creator and Lord, that Thou hast given me this joy in Thy creation, this delight in the works of Thy hands;

I have shown the excellency of Thy works unto man, so far as my finite mind was able to comprehend Thine infinity; if I have said aught of Thy glory, graciously forgive it.”

Two centuries later, Yale professor Benjamin Silliman, who in 1818 founded the American Journal of Science and Arts, stated:

“The relation of geology, as well as astronomy, to the Bible, when both are well understood, is that of perfect harmony…

The Word and the works of God cannot conflict, and the more they are studied the more perfect will their harmony appear.”

Best-selling author Eric Metaxas wrote in the The Wall Street Journal article “Science Increasingly Makes the Case for God” (Dec. 25, 2014):

“In 1966…astronomer Carl Sagan announced that there were two important criteria for a planet to support life: The right kind of star, and a planet the right distance from that star.

Given the roughly octillion-1 followed by 24 zeros-planets in the universe, there should have been about septillion-1 followed by 21 zeros-planets capable of supporting life…

But as years passed, the silence from the rest of the universe was deafening… As of 2014, researches have discovered precisely bubkis-ZERO followed by nothing…”

Eric Metaxas continued:

“What happened? As our knowledge of the universe increased, it became clear that there were far more factors necessary for life than Sagan supposed.

His two parameters grew to 10 and then 20 and then 50, and so the number of potentially life-supporting planets decreased accordingly…

Peter Schenkel wrote in a 2006 piece for Skeptical Inquirer magazine:

‘In light of new findings…we should quietly admit that the early estimates…may no longer be tenable.’

As factors continued to be discovered, the number of possible planets hit zero… In other words, the odds turned against any planet in the universe supporting life, including this one…”

Eric Metaxas stated further:

“Today there are more than 200 known parameters necessary for a planet to support life-every single one of which must be perfectly met, or the whole thing falls apart.

Without a massive planet like Jupiter nearby, whose gravity will draw away asteroids, a thousand times as many would hit Earth’s surface.

The odds against life in the universe are simply astonishing.  Yet here we are, not only existing, but talking about existing.

What can account for it?… At what point is it fair to admit that science suggests that we cannot be the result of random forces?…”

Eric Metaxas ended:

“Theoretical physicist Paul Davies has said that “the appearance of design is overwhelming”…

Oxford professor Dr. John Lennox has said

‘the more we get to know about our universe, the more the hypothesis that there is a Creator…gains in credibility as the best explanation of why we are here.’”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal Contributing Editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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Valley Forge was a trial of Faith


Valley Forge was a trial of Faith

Washington-Praying-at-Valley-ForgeAmerican Minute with Bill Federer

After the American victory at Saratoga, British General Howe struck back by driving the patriots out of Philadelphia.

On DECEMBER 19, 1777, over 11,000 American soldiers set up camp at Valley Forge, just 25 miles outside Philadelphia.

Meanwhile, another 11,000 Americans were dying on British starving ships.

Yale President Ezra Stiles recounted May 8, 1783:

“‘O that my head were waters, and my eyes a fountain of tears,’ that I might weep the thousands of our brethren that have perished in prison ships–

in one of which, the Jersey, then lying at New York, perished above eleven thousand the last three years–while others have been barbarously exiled to the East Indies for life.”

Soldiers at Valley Forge were from every State in the new union, some as young as 12 and others as old as 60.

Though most were of European descent, some were African American and American Indian.

Among them were Marquis de Lafayette and the future Chief Justice John Marshall.

Lacking food and supplies, soldiers died at the rate of twelve per day.

Over 2,500 froze to death in bitter cold, or perished from hunger, typhoid, jaundice, dysentery, and pneumonia.

In addition, hundreds of horses perished in the freezing weather.

A Committee from Congress reported on the soldiers:

“Feet and legs froze till they became black, and it was often necessary to amputate them.”

Of the wives and children who followed the army, mending clothes, doing laundry and scavenging for food, an estimated 500 died.

Two days before Christmas, George Washington wrote:

“We have this day no less than 2,873 men in camp unfit for duty because they are barefooted and otherwise naked.”

Washington wrote “…that unless some great and capital change suddenly takes place… this Army must inevitably… starve, dissolve, or disperse, in order to obtain subsistence in the best manner they can.”

Hessian Major Carl Leopold Baurmeister noted the only thing that kept the American army from disintegrating was their “spirit of liberty.”

A farmer reportedly observed General Washington kneeling in prayer in the snow.

On December 24, 1983, President Ronald Reagan stated in a Radio Address:

“The image of George Washington kneeling in prayer in the snow is one of the most famous in American history.”

On April 21, 1778, Washington wrote to Lt. Col. John Banister:

“No history…can furnish an instance of an army’s suffering such uncommon hardships as ours has done, and bearing them with the same patience and fortitude –

To see men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes, by which their marches might be traced by the blood from their feet, and almost as often without provisions…

marching through frost and snow, and at Christmas taking up their winter quarters within a day’s march of the enemy, without a house or hut to cover them…

and submitting to it without a murmur, is a mark of patience and obedience which in my opinion can scarce be paralleled.”

Despite these conditions, soldiers prepared to fight.

A Christmas carol that lifted spirits at this time was “God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen,” first published in 1760 on a broadsheet in London as a “New Christmas carol.” It was called “the most common and generally popular of all carol tunes”:

“God rest ye merry, gentlemen,
Let nothing you dismay.
For Jesus Christ our Savior,
Was born on Christmas Day;
To save us all from Satan’s power,
When we were gone astray. (Chorus)

O tidings of comfort and joy,
Comfort and joy,
O tidings of comfort and joy.”

In February, 1778, there arrived in the camp a Prussian drill master, Baron Friedrich von Steuben, who had been a member of the elite General Staff of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia.

Baron von Steuben, who was sent with the recommendation of Ben Franklin, drilled the soldiers daily, transforming the American volunteers into an army.

Lutheran Pastor Henry Muhlenberg, whose sons Peter and Frederick served in the First U.S. Congress, wrote in The Notebook of a Colonial Clergyman:

“I heard a fine example today, namely, that His Excellency General Washington rode around among his army yesterday and admonished each and every one to fear God, to put away the wickedness… and to practice the Christian virtues…

God has… marvelously, preserved him from harm in the midst of countless perils, ambuscades, fatigues.”

Washington successfully kept the army intact through the devastating winter, and gave the order at Valley Forge, April 12, 1778:

“The Honorable Congress having thought proper to recommend to the United States of America to set apart Wednesday, the 22nd inst., to be observed as a day of Fasting, Humiliation and Prayer,

that at one time, and with one voice, the righteous dispensations of Providence may be acknowledged, and His goodness and mercy towards our arms supplicated and implored:

The General directs that the day shall be most religiously observed in the Army; that no work shall be done thereon, and that the several chaplains do prepare discourses.”

On May 2, 1778, Washington ordered:

“The Commander-in-Chief directs that Divine service be performed every Sunday…To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.”


Bill FedererThe Moral Liberal Contributing Editor, William J. Federer, is the bestselling author of “Backfired: A Nation Born for Religious Tolerance no Longer Tolerates Religion,” and numerous other books. A frequent radio and television guest, his daily American Minute is broadcast nationally via radio, television, and Internet. Check out all of Bill’s bookshere.

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