46 – Feb. 15 – THIS DAY IN BAPTIST HISTORY PAST


A House For A Church

From nearly the beginning of the Massachusetts Colony until 1769, the Baptists had been persecuted in various ways in the city of Boston and, indeed, throughout the entire colony.  An infant church was first organized in Charlestown near Cambridge.  Thomas Gould became its pastor. He and his members paid dearly. They lost the right to vote, were fined and imprisoned, and were threatened with banishment. Gould was brought before both the secular courts and the church courts and charged with Anabaptism.  This Baptist church came into existence under the influence of Henry Dunster, the first president of Harvard College, who had adopted baptistic principles.  The church moved from Charlestown to Noddle’s Island and then dared to enter Boston sometime after Gould’s death in 1675.  John Russell became the new pastor.  Philip Squire and Ellis Callender built a small meetinghouse.  This building was so plain that it did not attract the attention of the Boston authorities until it was completed and the church began to use it for worship on February 15, 1679.  On March 8, 1680, the marshal was ordered to nail the doors, which he did, posting the following notice on the door: “All persons are to take notice that, by order of the Court, the doors of this house are shut up, and that they are inhibited to hold any meetings therein, or to open the doors thereof, without license from authority, till the Court take further order, as they will answer the contrary to their peril.”   In May, they came to the property to find the doors open! They went in boldly and held their services in their own building. For nearly 70 years this was the only Baptist church in Boston.

Dr. Dale R. Hart, adapted from:  This Day in Baptist History  III (David L. Cummins) pp. 93-94

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